Biotest

Whole Wheat vs. White Bread


#1

All in all, I understand that bread should not be a part of one’s diet. However, if I decided to have a piece maybe on a “trying to keep it somewhat healthy” cheat meal, whats the better choice? White or wheat, and why?


#2

Neither. All bread is wheat.

“Wheat” bread is often just dyed brown to fool people who don’t know much about nutrition. Stick to rice-based breads if you must have bread.

Read the book “Wheat Belly” and you’ll never touch regular bread or pasta again.


#3

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Neither. All bread is wheat.

“Wheat” bread is often just dyed brown to fool people who don’t know much about nutrition. Stick to rice-based breads if you must have bread.

Read the book “Wheat Belly” and you’ll never touch regular bread or pasta again. [/quote]

Chris:

Have you read either of Gary Taubes’ books (Good Calories, Bad Calories, or Why We Get Fat)?

I am considering getting Wheat Belly, but am also considering one or both of Taubes’ books.

About a decade ago I read Natural Hormonal Enhancement early on in college. It made a very good case for what we’d now call Paleo (though IIRC it didn’t make dairy a villian).

“Good” foods aren’t cheap. My wife and I are now in a position, and have made a commitment, to change some things about our eating. We cook more. We cook together. It is fun. My goal is to get a book that can help us take some of the changes we’ve already made to the next level.

What I’m not looking for is the next Paleo book. We won’t give up dairy (we are from WI, and I love milk and cheese). We can switch to rice-based breads and cereals without problem. Although I’m a scientist (PhD hopefully coming in about a year) and do care about the research behind things, mostly I’m looking for a book that, more than anything, makes the transition of cutting out grains and sugars (mostly done already) practical.

What book would you (or anyone else) recommend of the three mentioned above?


#4

I really don’t need a book to tell me how not to eat certain foods. I just don’t eat them. But it does help to know the why’s. The how’s are just a matter of manning up and practicing G.S.D. (get sh!t done.)

Good reads: The End of Overeating, Wheat Belly, Why We Get Fat.

BTW, milk has many of the same drawbacks as wheat, such as addictive exorphins which lead to overeating, but we meant to keep baby cows on the teat. Never meant for human consumption. Unsweetened almond milk is the way to go.


#5

I just ordered Wheat Belly with 2-day shipping from Amazon. Looking forward to it. I like that it has recipes for bread alternatives in it that make it practical to make the switch, and I’ve looked up the author and he seems to be the real deal.


#6

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
I really don’t need a book to tell me how not to eat certain foods. I just don’t eat them. But it does help to know the why’s. The how’s are just a matter of manning up and practicing G.S.D. (get sh!t done.)

Good reads: The End of Overeating, Wheat Belly, Why We Get Fat.

BTW, milk has many of the same drawbacks as wheat, such as addictive exorphins which lead to overeating, but we meant to keep baby cows on the teat. Never meant for human consumption. Unsweetened almond milk is the way to go. [/quote]

I read The End of Overeating, and after reading Wheat Belly (a lot!) I went back and checked the TEO index. Nope, no longer for me. It recommends whole grains for eating. Good other info and all, but I need to reinforce the proper stuff.

Still struggle with sugar but can actually do NEPA now! Still adjusting. :slight_smile:


#7

White bread v brown bread… if its commercial breads, none of them!

If however you are making homemade bread the conventional way (yeast, salt, sugar) then white is better because the phytic acid is vastly reduced in the processing of the flour. Whole grains are full of phytic acid, as are nuts, seeds and oats.

BUT

The problem with white bread is it is devoid of nutrients because the nutritious bit of the grain has been removed so whole grain is vastly better but it has to be treated properly. If you want access to the nutrition available in whole grains look into soaking and fermentation to neutralise the phytic acid.

If you are bothered with soaking etc. then sourdough bread is the way to go if you do choose to eat bread.

Btw I am not discounting all the other antinutrients associated with wheat, rye, splet, oats, nuts ect.

Read this about Phytic Acid…
http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/living-with-phytic-acid

Or this by Mark Sisson who is a Paleo Ninja

Review of Wheat Belly
http://www.westonaprice.org/thumbs-up-reviews/wheat-belly-by-william-davis