Biotest

What Happens if You 'Do Too Much'?


#1

So, I’m curious… caveat here, or point of clarification, I’m not asking this because I have a sinister plan to DO MORE, it’s mainly because I just recently turned down two requests to do other workouts (thrice weekly complexes, and this running program coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml ) and gave the reason that I was doing velocity training.

One of my friends doing the cool runnings deal said, well why not do both… run with us on your off days. I simply said I can’t because it would be too much… but what is the reasoning? Is it a thing where doing too much leads to muscle loss, or would turn my body into a craving machine where i would go off the diet to feed myself the energy I was expending? If I did more than NEPA on off days, what would happen?


#2

You’ll feel like shit and have no energy. You’re just not eating enough to support recovery from extra training. Trust me, I’ve tried it. Twice.


#3
  1. With a low-calorie diet, the risk of overtraining or burnout is higher.

  2. You want to save your energy for what actually counts: the weight training. Do too much and you’ll half-ass everything.

  3. You could lose muscle with excessive cardio, which zaps your metabolism.

  4. “More” won’t cause you to lose fat any faster, assuming you’re doing the V-Diet 100% correctly. So why do more if there are only risks and no benefits?


#4

Using the same line of thought as the OP but with no intention of running without being chased.

What would happen if I lifted my normal split and started the V-Diet?

Normally I run a 4 day split that I can do back to back if I feel good/energetic that week. But I have been throwing a rest day in between. So it looks like 4 days on 1 day off, repeat.

Is this bad to due if I drop my calories down to the 1900 in the V-diet training days?


#5

[quote]JLone wrote:
Using the same line of thought as the OP but with no intention of running without being chased.

What would happen if I lifted my normal split and started the V-Diet?

Normally I run a 4 day split that I can do back to back if I feel good/energetic that week. But I have been throwing a rest day in between. So it looks like 4 days on 1 day off, repeat.

Is this bad to due if I drop my calories down to the 1900 in the V-diet training days?[/quote]
You will die…

Nah, maybe not, but it’s hard to say. Many people do their own thing as far as the workouts go, for various reasons. But you’ll see the phrase “For best results with the V-Diet, follow the V-Diet”. Could your workout program produce good results still? Yeah maybe, but are you smarter than the creators of the V-Diet, Chris Shugart and Chad Waterbury, such that you think you can develop a workout program better suited for the V-Diet?


#6

Am I smarter?..

Mwahahahahaha… No, No I’m not.


#7

[quote]hockeydawg wrote:
are you smarter than the creators of the V-Diet, Chris Shugart and Chad Waterbury, such that you think you can develop a workout program better suited for the V-Diet? [/quote]

I don’t think that’s an accurate way to look at it at all. Chris and Chad have attempted a one size fits all regimen. There is inevitably some tweaking to take place to find out what works optimally for a given individual. The workouts and calories are exactly the same for a given weight class, and do not take into consideration the strength levels of the individual or body composition. There is nothing magic about the training program.


#8

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]hockeydawg wrote:
are you smarter than the creators of the V-Diet, Chris Shugart and Chad Waterbury, such that you think you can develop a workout program better suited for the V-Diet? [/quote]

I don’t think that’s an accurate way to look at it at all. Chris and Chad have attempted a one size fits all regimen. There is inevitably some tweaking to take place to find out what works optimally for a given individual. The workouts and calories are exactly the same for a given weight class, and do not take into consideration the strength levels of the individual or body composition. There is nothing magic about the training program. [/quote]
Why is that not accurate? Your explanation leads one to believe that it exactly what I was talking about. For the more advanced lifters and experienced guys, then yeah, they could do their own thing as they are probably more “in-tune” with what their body can do and what works best for them. For the novice, or intermediate lifter then it’s probably best to do the workout program as prescribed. Yeah, it’s not a magical training program, none of them are, ultimately you get out what you put in. But it is a very good program for the purposes of the V-Diet (in my not-so-expert opinion), especially because your food intake is the way it is.

I would say that your statement that it doesn’t “take into consideration the strength levels of the individual or body composition” isn’t really completely accurate either. There are 3 different levels, and obviously the weight used is specific to an individual’s strength. The stronger you are, the more weight you lift So short of a customized program written for each individual, it is pretty good, again for the novice or intermediate lifter.

I didn’t tell JLone not to do his own thing. It was a serious question I posed, I wasn’t trying to be a smart-ass (although I can certainly see how some might have taken it that way). I have no idea what his experience level in the weight room is. If he is an advanced lifter then maybe he should do his own program. Ultimately it’s a personal choice. I just think a lot of people dismiss the workout program because it looks deceptively simple…until you actually do it.


#9

[quote]hockeydawg wrote:

[quote]jskrabac wrote:

[quote]hockeydawg wrote:
are you smarter than the creators of the V-Diet, Chris Shugart and Chad Waterbury, such that you think you can develop a workout program better suited for the V-Diet? [/quote]

I don’t think that’s an accurate way to look at it at all. Chris and Chad have attempted a one size fits all regimen. There is inevitably some tweaking to take place to find out what works optimally for a given individual. The workouts and calories are exactly the same for a given weight class, and do not take into consideration the strength levels of the individual or body composition. There is nothing magic about the training program. [/quote]
Why is that not accurate? Your explanation leads one to believe that it exactly what I was talking about. For the more advanced lifters and experienced guys, then yeah, they could do their own thing as they are probably more “in-tune” with what their body can do and what works best for them. For the novice, or intermediate lifter then it’s probably best to do the workout program as prescribed. Yeah, it’s not a magical training program, none of them are, ultimately you get out what you put in. But it is a very good program for the purposes of the V-Diet (in my not-so-expert opinion), especially because your food intake is the way it is.

I would say that your statement that it doesn’t “take into consideration the strength levels of the individual or body composition” isn’t really completely accurate either. There are 3 different levels, and obviously the weight used is specific to an individual’s strength. The stronger you are, the more weight you lift So short of a customized program written for each individual, it is pretty good, again for the novice or intermediate lifter.

I didn’t tell JLone not to do his own thing. It was a serious question I posed, I wasn’t trying to be a smart-ass (although I can certainly see how some might have taken it that way). I have no idea what his experience level in the weight room is. If he is an advanced lifter then maybe he should do his own program. Ultimately it’s a personal choice. I just think a lot of people dismiss the workout program because it looks deceptively simple…until you actually do it. [/quote]

I agree with what you’ve said here. The only thing I took exception to was your statement that you have to think your smarter than the trainers in order to tweak the program to fit your needs. I do not think I am smarter than any of the contributing trainers on this site; however, I know my body better than any of them.