Biotest

V-Diet, Day One...and More Exercises?


#1

Hey there, T-Nation! I am glad to join the V-Diet ranks and am looking forward to an interesting 28 days.

I am 46 years old and come in at 6’1" and 205 lbs. I have been stuck at about the same body fat percentage for quite sometime now and just cannot get over that hump. I have recently added some muscle and strength gains, but still cannot get blow-up that damn “survival pouch” hanging out at my belly button!

My day 1 was pretty uneventful…although mid-morning I thought I was going to eat my desk, or at least some paper. I may adjust the timing of my shakes bc I apparently am ravenous around 1030.

I did the Advanced workout as laid out and I have a lot left in my tank at the end…plus, it really doesn’t take too long to get through it since the rest is so limited and the reps are fast. So, my first question for those in the know is whether I should add some additional weight training or HIIT workouts. I don’t want to overdo it, but I am used to spending more time and energy in the gym at least 5 days/week.

Thank you for any insights or pearls of wisdom!
Steve


#2

Did you sort this out? Having a some coffee or tea around this time would also be a solution if you didn’t want to shift around the shake schedule.

Are you also used to running on this level of carbs and calories? Because the diet is a huge factor. Feeling relatively good at the end of a training session is not the worst thing in the world. I’ve told people in the past, if you want to be sore after a workout, do 4 supersets of 50 deep bodyweight squats with 75 barefoot jumping jacks. Your legs will feel like crap after, but you won’t have made much actual progress.

As long as you’re honestly pushing yourself hard during the session and sticking to the plan, you’re on track. The suggested weight training plus the v-burn session plus the NEPA are all designed to let the nutrition handle most of the fat loss. That’s why diet is the key factor is determining fat loss and training is secondary.

You said that you’re used to spending more time in the gym and lifting 5 days a week, but don’t forget that “more” is definitely not always “better.” Especially if you’ve been using the same approach for a while, doing something significantly different in the gym is pretty much always a way to spark new progress.

Adding extra training, or doing your own plan like some people try, is basically at your own discretion. The whole V-Diet approach was designed to coordinate the training and nutrition. Any variables are treading new ground and can’t be guaranteed to bring the same results.

You could do a different weight training program as long as it’s properly programmed, but I’d steer away from adding HIIT because it’ll almost definitely impact recovery. I’d also keep the weekly V-burn as an assessment of sorts and for conditioning. Since you want to be adding or at least preserving muscle while burning fat, performance of the bodyweight circuit should still improve weekly and the V-burn can make sure you’re headed in the right direction.


#3

Thank you, very much, for the detailed response. Your point about wanting to be sore made me laugh…great point.

I have figured out the ravenous part…I am spreading my shakes out more evenly than I had been. Plus, I think I am getting used to it.

Your advice is consistent with what I have read on here from others talking about tweaking the diet or exercise program. The last work out I focused on form and speed…and noticed the difference. I appreciate the response and your perspective…I will work the program hard, as is.

Thanks again!