Biotest

The Transition: Coming Off


#1

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/5/6/564ad-stairwell.jpg

NOTE: I decided to give the Transition phase its own thread. Feel free to post Transition-related questions below.

The original Velocity Diet didn’t have much of a transition phase to ease you off the diet. With over three years of feedback and experimentation, that Transition period has been perfected. Here’s a rough draft of it below:

The Transition: Coming Off the Velocity Diet

If you’ve followed the plan correctly, the transition back to solid meals is going to be a pleasant surprise. Because of the changes in habits and food preferences, you won’t be tempted to binge on unhealthy foods as most dieters do. Instead you’ll have a newfound love of healthier fare along with a powerful sense of dietary control. You’ll also notice that you’ll get full very quickly after the V-Diet is complete.

The transition process is simple and can be individualized to fit your needs and goals. What’s more, most V-Dieters with additional body fat to lose will continue to lose it during this stage. For example, many people report dropping 20 pounds during the four-week strict phase and another 4 or 5 pounds in the two week transition period. And since dietary behaviors and taste preferences are altered during the V-Diet, maintenance or continued fat loss is relatively painless.

Here’s what to do after your 28 day V-Diet:

Step #1: One Solid Healthy Meal Per Day

For a few days after the V-Diet, every day is “solid meal day.” Have one solid, healthy meal per day. The timing of this meal is up to you, but I generally suggest breakfast or lunch.

Most people who carry around too much body fat overeat at night. They don’t just overeat, they binge. Then, with that gigantic glut of carby calories in their bellies, they go to bed – in a nutshell causing those calories to be stored as body fat instead of being used to fuel activity. On a side note, binge eating – consuming an enormous amount of calories in one sitting – is now considered to be the number one eating disorder in America.

This is why I suggest that your solid daily meal during the first step of the transition phase be breakfast or lunch. Most people don’t have the time to overeat during these times of the day. It’s after work, in the evening, when things get tricky.

I also like for the last meal of the day to be a low-carb Metabolic Drive shake. This way you can control calories in this “dangerous” time of day and prevent any possible nighttime catabolism of lean muscle tissue. (This is again due to the slow-release micellar casein content, making Metabolic Drive the ideal “nighttime shake.”) If you ever find yourself adding back too much body fat, the simple trick of making your last meal a low-carb shake will get you back on track in just a few days.

However, if you enjoy your quick and easy protein shakes for breakfast (and you’ve never had a problem with nighttime overeating) you can move the solid meal to any other time of the day. Just keep it healthy!

How long should you stay in step number one? I suggest at least two or three days, though many people extend this to a full week if they want to continue losing fat at a rapid pace.

Sample Step One Daily Menus

Breakfast Option

Meal #1: Old fashioned oatmeal with blueberries, scrambled egg whites

Meal #2: Metabolic Drive shake, 2 Flameout capsules

Meal #3: Metabolic Drive shake with milled flax seed

Meal #4: Metabolic Drive shake, 2 Flameout capsules

Meal #5: Metabolic Drive shake with natural peanut butter

Lunch Option

Meal #1: Metabolic Drive shake, 2 Flameout capsules

Meal #2: Grilled chicken over large spinach salad, olive oil based dressing

Meal #3: Metabolic Drive shake, 2 Flameout capsules

Meal #4: Metabolic Drive shake with milled flax seed

Meal #5: Metabolic Drive shake with natural peanut butter

Step #2: Two or Three Solid Meals Per Day

Remember, smaller frequent meals (eating every few hours) leads to less body fat, more muscle, and a more efficient metabolism than the typical “three squares a day.” Even after the Velocity Diet you should be aiming to eat 4-6 times per day. Many people use meal replacement shakes to accomplish this, and that’s very similar to step two of your V-Diet transition.

Simply have two or three shakes per day, then two or three healthy solid meals or snacks. One method of doing this is to have a shake to begin your day and a shake to end it. Again, this solves the nighttime overeating problem, plus it allows you to have a fast and healthy breakfast, something many busy people skip.

But once again, the timing of the solid meals isn’t crucial here. Do what best fits your schedule. Because of convenience, many people like to have their shakes for lunch and mid-afternoon snacks instead. That’s fine.

Like the first step, step two can last as long as you need it to. Most people have success when staying in step two for three or four days.

Sample Step Two Daily Menus

“Bookend” Option

Meal #1: Metabolic Drive shake

Meal #2: Turkey burger on whole grain bread, salad

Meal #3: Tuna on low-carb, whole grain wrap

Meal #4: Grilled chicken breasts, steamed vegetables

Meal #5: Metabolic Drive shake

Note: The Bookend Option is a very simple method of losing additional body fat. Since breakfast is often skipped – which leads to late-day overeating and metabolism damage via muscle loss – and too many calories are usually consumed before bed, “bookending” your day with low-carb shakes makes for a simple yet effective fat loss plan. The mid-day meals need to be healthy of course, but taking care of these two problem times of the day usually leads to no-brainer fat loss. This option is sometimes called the Velocity Diet Lite.

Mid-Day Meals Option

Meal #1: Spinach omelet made with omega-3 enriched whole eggs

Meal #2: Metabolic Drive shake

Meal #3: Metabolic Drive shake

Meal #4: Metabolic Drive shake

Meal #5: Salmon or steak with grilled zucchini and squash

Step #3: One Shake Per Day

The final step is to have one shake per day and eat healthy solid meals the rest of the time. This shake should be consumed:

– Whenever you’d otherwise skip a meal because you’re busy

– At night if you still have problems overeating at this time

– Breakfast if you’d normally skip this meal

Many people, including myself, stay in step three permanently. Simply having one healthy shake per day insures adequate protein intake and prevents any dietary lapses caused by missing meals.

How Long Does the Whole Transition Last?

Two weeks at least. Remember, you can personalize this phase of the diet by staying however long you want in each step. The transition is basically a diet unto itself, so if you have more fat to lose after the strict four-week phase, then you can continue to lose weight in the transition phase, especially in step one.

Besides protein shakes, it’s also helpful to keep taking your other supplements during this transition phase. In fact, for overall health and longevity, supplements like Functional Fatty Acids (Flameout) should be lifelong staples.


#2

One note:

A lot of people really want to stay on the diet longer than four weeks. A better idea is to do the standard four-week diet, then do a very strict two-week Transition.

A strict Transition would look like this:

28 Days V-Diet

7 Days of one HSM (Healthy Solid Meal) per day, the rest shakes

7 Days of two HSMs per day, the rest of the meals as shakes


Coming off Velocity Diet?
#3

Alright I figure I’ll throw my input on this since I’ve just finished the transition.

I extended all the tansition steps to 4 days and it seemed to work quite well. I lost a little bit more body fat, added some muscle (probably from increased carbs), but otherwise havn’t gained any scale weight to speak of.

The eating habit changes are AMAZING! I eat vegtables now and that’s just weird. I have no desire for high sugar content products either.

So my current diet now isn’t terrible but it sure as hell isn’t wonderful. I’m not gaining any fat and I’m sure I’m still losing some but its definitly at a slower pace as to be expected.

7:20AM HOT-ROX (down to two a day from four)
8:00AM Half protein Shake and Whole grain peanut butter sandwich, 3 BCAA’s and 1 Multivitamin
10:00AM Stick of Beef Jerky (number one manly food I believe)
12:30 Lunch ranges from the least terrible chinese food to turkey sandwich to Italian beef.
Occasionally I have pizza but that is the worst food I eat and I refuse to eat it for dinner anymore. 3Flameout, 2 BCAA’s

4:00 Full Metabolic Drive shake. 2Flameout Multivitamin 2 BCAA
7:00 Dinner. What ever mom makes if it isn’t unhealthy or if it is unhealthy another Metabolic Drive shake and some yogurt. 3 Flameout
10:00 Half-Full Metabolic Drive shake depending on if weight training that day.
11:00 ZMA + 3 BCAA right before I sleep

Now I don’t know what the calories are but from what I’m guessing it isn’t extraordinary. I’ve managed to learn portion control with lunch and dinner. There is no binge eating on anything anymore. My current program is the Waterbury summer project and its going great.

Chris if I could get some feedback from you on your thoughts on my current diet that would be very appreciated alone with other T-members.


#4

[quote]RageInspired wrote:
Chris if I could get some feedback from you on your thoughts on my current diet that would be very appreciated alone with other T-members. [/quote]

Instead of bread, try to get some of those low-carb, high fiber tortillas. Great for wraps. While choosing 100% whole grain bread is a step in the right direction, for someone still wanting to lose fat I’d just avoid bread altogether.

Also, try to add some vegetables, and obviously pizza should be avoided at this stage. If you must have pizza, have my low-carb “green pizza” here:

http://www.t-nation.com/article/diet_and_nutrition/good_sht&cr=


#5

Thanks Chris, I realize mine seemed to kind of go off topic but it was more about the post post V-Diet.
I’ll be looking for those tortilla’s tonight then. I think I’ll get a couple friends together to try the green pizza and see how that works out.


#6

Let me tell ya that green pizza rocks!
We actually put ours on the grill and have eaten them many, many times. Glad to read the transition. I have more fat to lose than can be lost in the 28 day period. So I need to go longer and will most likely add another week or even two if needed before I do the transition.

On day 18 now and have plenty of time and effort available to get down to my first basic goals. If not achieved, will hang in until I do. Then move thru the transitions to get down past my initial goals to where I really “should” be but haven’t been since 1991…I doubt I can undo 17 years of bad in 28 days. But I got one heckuva start!!!


#7

Hi everyone!

Going into the transition phase tomorrow, I have a question…
DO I keep the total calorie allowance per day the same or do I decrease it due to the weight loss? what about the carbs, do we keep the 100g max limit per day?

I can not seem to find the answer and believe me I read, I read :wink:


#8

[quote]shonaa wrote:
Hi everyone!

Going into the transition phase tomorrow, I have a question…
DO I keep the total calorie allowance per day the same or do I decrease it due to the weight loss? what about the carbs, do we keep the 100g max limit per day?

I can not seem to find the answer and believe me I read, I read :wink:

[/quote]

Try to keep calories about the same for now. So for example, in the first part of the Transition you’re adding one solid healthy meal per day. That meal should be around 300 calories - about the same as a shake with flax. Carbs can come up some, but keep the sources healthy - veggies, a little fruit etc.

You can play with those numbers later. We don’t want to drop them too low because that can actually stall further fat loss (if you need it.) Ideally, V-Dieters move on to simple healthy eating and don’t have to mess with calorie counting. If you’ve experienced the taste and craving changes, this is pretty easy because you naturally choose healthier foods and avoid bad ones.

And don’t panic if you gain a pound or two during the Transition. Adding back in some carbs will do that, but it’s not fat, just water/muscle glycogen. Those who still want to lose fat usually do after the V-Diet, but there is a normalization of “water weight” once you start adding back in healthy solid foods.


#9

Thank You Chris for the anwer…:slight_smile: I will do that


#10

So, during the transition phase say I am going to do the strict version. Would I keep taking my supps as I am now? (BCAAs, TRIBEX, HOT-ROX & Flameout)

I know it was said to keep taking the Flameout I’m just curious.

Thanks,

BD


#11

[quote]BackDay wrote:
So, during the transition phase say I am going to do the strict version. Would I keep taking my supps as I am now? (BCAAs, TRIBEX, HOT-ROX & Flameout)

I know it was said to keep taking the Flameout I’m just curious.

Thanks,

BD[/quote]

It’s helpful, yes, to keep the supps up during the two-week Transition. I think Flameout should be a staple, along with Superfood, for the rest of a person’s life.

If money is an issue during the Transition, you can taper down the HOT-ROX and stop the Tribex (which is just optional anyway for the V-Diet.)


#12

this is off the subject a little but has anyone who has done the V Diet felt really cold ? I feel so dam cold at times , kind of funny


#13

Because we are now in the transition phase and starting to take in a meal a day (albeit controlled and healthy), is it possible to start introducing some light cardio, jogging or even a day of sprints to help encourage fat loss? Would we still run the risk losing muscle if we have the cardio and the NEPA walk.

Thanks
BD


#14

[quote]BackDay wrote:
Because we are now in the transition phase and starting to take in a meal a day (albeit controlled and healthy), is it possible to start introducing some light cardio, jogging or even a day of sprints to help encourage fat loss? Would we still run the risk losing muscle if we have the cardio and the NEPA walk.

Thanks
BD[/quote]

Don’t overdo it, but during Transition you can replace a day of NEPA walk with 20 to 30 minutes of intervals, standard cardio etc.


#15

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
BackDay wrote:
Because we are now in the transition phase and starting to take in a meal a day (albeit controlled and healthy), is it possible to start introducing some light cardio, jogging or even a day of sprints to help encourage fat loss? Would we still run the risk losing muscle if we have the cardio and the NEPA walk.

Thanks
BD

Don’t overdo it, but during Transition you can replace a day of NEPA walk with 20 to 30 minutes of intervals, standard cardio etc. [/quote]

Good to hear. It’s been tough to stop myself from jogging on these walks…until I thought of the muscle loss and settled in for the fast walk.

Thanks again for all of your help Shugs and mark me down as another successful V-Dieter.


#16

My results from the V-Diet was 28 pounds in 28 days and about 6-7% bodyfat. No strength loss at all, just the oppisite in fact, as I used it to train for a powerlifting meet in a lower weight class. Huge success.

The transition phase was simple, my body burned carbs like a machine in the first few weeks after eating solids again, and made me look uber-huge. I’m not the type of person that is carb tolerent either. About a month after finishing the diet is when I started to notice that I couldn’t eat pancakes every morning without suffering some consequences.

6 months after the diet I feel like I can metabolize food better than before. You learn a lot about your body after 28 days with barely any solids.

Spin : 3 weeks ago I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and now have to watch everything I eat as certain foods have the potential of putting me in the ER (scary). I will start the V-Diet tomorrow to see how it affects my digestive tract and post results somewhere - probably on another V-Diet thread.


#17

Chris:

I will be doing the 2 weeks transition by going one week of 1 HSM then adding another for a few days until I hit 1 shake per by the end of the week.

I will be going to Russia(vacation) at the end of December for 14 days. I’m going to stay at a family’s house so eating choices will be tough most of the time :-(, Russians tent to use ketchup in their meats e.t.c which actually has me kind of worried because I really just don’t even crave anything un-healthy thanks to the V-Diet. Anyways my plan is to do this:

I will be finished by the 23 or so of next month with the transition. I will do something like this afterwards:

November 24-November 31

Increase calories by 250 per day

December 1-December 7

Add another 250 calories per day

by December 21 I should be at around 2300 calories and thats right before my vacation.

Should I up the calories a bit more once out of the transition phase or is the 250 calories per week approach a good one?


#18

Ronaldo7, you’re just going to have to try it and see what happens. Your plan looks good though.

Honesty, most find eating right for any goal easier after the V-Diet: carb tolerance improves, food choices are easier to make, etc. So you may be able to handle it more instinctively than you think, without all the calories counting.


#19

What is the workout program for transition phase? I just finishe the V-Diet on 10/28. I went from 237 to 219.5. I probably would have done better if I followed it 100%.


#20

[quote]d-tox wrote:
What is the workout program for transition phase? [/quote]

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_bodybuilding_velocity/the_official_vdiet_workouts