Biotest

The Official V-Diet Workouts


#1

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/e/7/e761c-pullupBW.jpg

(I thought I’d start a new thread with this info since many people aren’t seeing the other places where it’s posted.)

The older V-articles contained no specific workout, though I usually recommended a Chad Waterbury plan. Waterbury has since written special programs for every level of V-Dieter.

Note that each level (beginner, intermediate and advanced) has two phases: one for the first 4 strict weeks, and one for the 2 Transition weeks.

[center] The V-Workouts [/center]

The V-Diet exercise plan consists of two main things: a special weight training program and NEPA-based walks. Here’s an overview of each.

1. Weight Training: If you’re not going to perform some type of resistance training when dieting, then don’t bother dieting. Weight training while losing fat is essential. Muscle is the primary determiner of your metabolic rate. Most dieters lose muscle tissue as they lose fat, leading to metabolism damage and yo-yo dieting.

What’s more, most dieters are disappointed and de-motivated at the end of their diets because they look flabby and flat. This is caused by a simple lack of muscle or loss of muscle.

The V-Diet weight training program has been specially designed by strength and conditioning specialist Chad Waterbury. You’ll perform resistance training three times per week on this plan. This will speed the fat loss process and help you retain and even build lean muscle tissue. When you finish the diet, you’ll be leaner, harder, and more defined, not flabby and weak!

2. NEPA Walks: There is no traditional cardio or aerobics on the V-Diet plan. It’s not necessary and actually counterproductive. Excess cardio during a strict diet like this can lead to muscle loss. Instead, you’ll be focusing on NEPA or Non-Exercise Physical Activity.

NEPA (sometimes called NEAT or Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis) is basically all the moving around you do outside of the gym. A person with a desk job gets very little NEPA, while a guy who works construction and walks to work gets a lot. Simple really. Yet studies show that just walking more each day leads to long term weight management and improved overall health.

On the V-Diet and during the transition phase, you’ll basically go for a walk every day and seek to increase your natural level of NEPA.

Let’s first take a look at Waterbury’s resistance training program, then delve into the details of the NEPA walks.

[center] HBT: Hard Body Training, by Chad Waterbury [/center]

There are three workout programs below designed especially for people using the Velocity Diet:

  1. The Beginner Program – Use this program if you’re new to weight training or have been out of the gym for a few years.

  2. The Intermediate Program – This program is for those with two or three years of consistent lifting experience.

  3. The Advanced Program – The advanced program is for those who’ve been training with weights consistently for at least the last three years.

Each program consists of two phases:

Phase I: This is the exercise program you’ll use during the 28-day V-Diet.

Phase II: This is the program you’ll use during the two-week transition phase of the diet.

The programs are designed for be used three times per week: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, or Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Just pick the one that best fits your experience level. (On your “off” days you will still take your NEPA walk.)

[center] The Beginner Program [/center]

PHASE I: V-Diet, 4 Weeks

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

A1 Pulldown with supinated grip (palms facing you) for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A2 Deadlift for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 Decline dumbbell bench press for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 five more times

Two sets of side plank hold for 30 seconds on each side

Note: When you see A1, A2, A3 etc. that means you perform one set of the A1 exercise, then one set of the A2 exercise after resting, and finally the A3 exercise. After a rest, you perform all three exercises again for the required number of sets.

In the Monday workout above, you do a set of pulldowns, rest 30 seconds, a set of deadlifts, rest 30 seconds, then a set of decline dumbbell bench presses. After another 30 second rest you repeat those exercises five times. At the end of the workout, you perform the side plank holds.

If you see B1, B2, B3 etc. that means you perform that circuit of exercises after you’re completely finished with the “A” movements.

Wednesday

A1 Standing alternating dumbbell shoulder press for 6 reps
Rest 35 seconds

A2 Alternating reverse lunge for 6 reps
Rest 35 seconds

A3 One-arm dumbbell row for 6 reps
Rest 35 seconds and repeat A1-A3 twice more

B1 Overhead dumbbell triceps extension for 6 reps
Rest 35 seconds

B2 Standing dumbbell hammer curl for 6 reps
Rest 35 seconds

B3 Bodyweight squat for 15 reps
Rest 35 seconds and repeat B1-B3 twice more

Two sets of plank hold for 45 seconds

Friday

A1 Dumbbell Romanian deadlift for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A2 Push-up for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 Wide-grip pulldown for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 twice more

B1 Standing dumbbell side raise for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B2 Bent over dumbbell row for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B3 Reverse crunch for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B4 Step-ups for 8 reps on each leg
Rest 60 seconds and repeat B1-B4 twice more

Phase I Progression

Each week you’re going to make the workout a little tougher by adding a circuit, resting less, or adding a rep. Here’s how to progress in the beginner program:

Monday: Add one circuit to each workout. So by week 4 you’ll perform 9 circuits of A1-A3. Increase the side plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Wednesday: Decrease each rest period by 5 seconds. So by week 4 you’ll rest only 20 seconds between each exercise. Increase the plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Friday: Add one repetition to each set. So by week 4 you’ll perform 11 reps for each exercise.

PHASE II: Transition, 2 Weeks

As you transition off the V-Diet, you’ll use this modified training program.

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

7 sets of pulldown with pronated grip (palms facing away from you) for 5 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

7 sets of dumbbell Romanian deadlift for 5 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

7 sets of dumbbell bench press for 5 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

2 sets of side plank hold for 60 seconds
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Note: These are straight sets. You’ll perform all 7 sets of pulldowns for example before moving on to the dumbbell Romanian deadlifts.

Wednesday

3 sets of reverse lunge for 8 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of one-arm dumbbell row for 8 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of narrow hand position push-up for 8 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of step-ups for 8 reps with each leg
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of dumbbell side raise for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

2 sets of plank hold for 75 seconds
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Friday

3 sets of push press for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of pulldown with palms-up grip for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of dumbbell bench press for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of reverse crunch for 12 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

3 sets of bodyweight squats for 20 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

[center] The Intermediate Program [/center]

PHASE I: V-Diet, 4 Weeks

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

A1 Wide-grip pull-up for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A2 Deadlift for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 Dip for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 six more times

2 sets of side plank hold for 45 seconds on each side

Note: When you see A1, A2, A3 etc. that means you perform one set of the A1 exercise, then one set of the A2 exercise after resting, and finally the A3 exercise. After a rest, you perform all three exercises again for the required number of sets.

In the Monday workout above, you do a set of pull-ups, rest 30 seconds, a set of deadlifts, rest 30 seconds, then a set of dips. After another 30 second rest you repeat those exercises six times. At the end of the workout, you perform the side plank holds.

If you see B1, B2, B3 etc. that means you perform that circuit of exercises after you’re completely finished with the “A” movements.

Wednesday

A1 Standing alternating dumbbell shoulder press for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds

A2 Alternating forward lunge for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds

A3 One-arm dumbbell row for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds and repeat A1-A3 three more times

B1 Overhead dumbbell triceps extension for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds

B2 Standing dumbbell hammer curl for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds

B3 Front squat for 4 reps
Rest 35 seconds and repeat B1-B3 three more times

2 sets of plank hold for 60 seconds

Friday

A1 Dumbbell Romanian deadlift for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A2 Bench press for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 Chin-up for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 three more times

B1 Standing dumbbell side raise for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B2 Bent over barbell row for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B3 Reverse crunch for 8 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B4 Reverse lunge for 8 reps on each leg
Rest 60 seconds and repeat B1-B4 three more times

Phase I Progression

Each week you’ll make the workout harder by adding a circuit, resting less, or adding a repetition. Here’s how to progress in the intermediate program:

Monday: Add one circuit to each workout. So by week 4 you’ll perform 10 circuits of A1-A3. Increase the side plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Wednesday: Decrease each rest period by 5 seconds. So by week 4 you’ll rest only 20 seconds between each exercise. Increase the plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Friday: Add one repetition to each set. So by week 4 you’ll perform 11 reps for each exercise.

PHASE II: Transition, 2 Weeks

As you transition off the V-Diet, you’ll use the training program below.

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

8 sets of medium grip pull-up for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

8 sets of sumo deadlift for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

8 sets of barbell bench press for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

2 sets of side plank hold for 75 seconds
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Note: These are straight sets. For example, you’ll perform all 8 sets of pull-ups before moving on to the sumo deadlifts.

Wednesday

4 sets of reverse lunge for 7 reps with each leg
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of bent over barbell row with palms-up grip for 7 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of feet-elevated narrow hand position push-up for 7 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of good morning for 7 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

2 sets of plank hold for 90 seconds
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Friday

3 sets of dumbbell Romanian deadlift for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of hammer curl with overhead press for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of push-up for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of reverse crunch for 12 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

2 sets of back squat for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

[center] The Advanced Program [/center]

PHASE I: V-Diet, 4 Weeks

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

A1 Wide-grip pull-up for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A2 Overhead squat for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 Dip for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 six more times

Two sets of side plank hold for 60 seconds on each side

Note: As an advanced gym goer, you probably know this, but here’s a quick review. Those A1, A2, A3 designations mean that you perform one set of the A1 exercise, then one set of the A2 exercise after resting, and finally the A3 exercise. After one more rest, you perform all three exercises again for the required number of sets.

In the Monday workout above, you do a set of pull-ups, rest 30 seconds, a set of overhead squats, rest 30 seconds, then a set of dips. After another 30 second rest you repeat those exercises six times. At the end of the workout, you perform the side plank holds.

If you see B1, B2, B3 etc. that means you perform that circuit of exercises after you’re completely finished with the “A” movements.

Wednesday

A1 Dumbbell shoulder press with forward lunge for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

Note: This is a combo lift – two exercises performed together. Press the dumbbells overhead as you lunge forward. Lower the dumbbells as you return to the start position.

A2 Dumbbell hang clean for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

A3 One-arm dumbbell row for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat A1-A3 three more times

B1 Close-grip bench press for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B2 Standing barbell curl for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds

B3 Front squat for 4 reps
Rest 30 seconds and repeat B1-B3 three more times

Two sets of plank hold for 90 seconds

Friday

A1 Power clean for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds

A2 Clap push-up for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds

A3 Chin-up for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds and repeat A1-A3 three more times

B1 Standing dumbbell side raise for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds

B2 Bent over barbell row for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds

B3 Reverse crunch on slant board for 6 reps
Rest 40 seconds

B4 Reverse lunge with hammer curl for 6 reps on each side
Rest 60 seconds and repeat B1-B4 three more times

Phase I Progression

Each week you’ll make the workout harder by adding a circuit, resting less, or adding a repetition. Here’s how to progress in the advanced program:

Monday: Add one circuit to each workout. So by week 4 you’ll perform 10 circuits of A1-A3. Increase the side plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Wednesday: Add one repetition to each set. So by week 4 you’ll perform 7 reps for each exercise. Increase the plank hold by 10 seconds with each workout.

Friday: Decrease each rest period by 5 seconds. So by week 4 you’ll rest 25 seconds between each exercise.

PHASE II: Transition, 2 Weeks

As you transition off the V-Diet, you’ll use the training program below.

Loading: Use the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets.

Tempo: Perform the lifting and lowering phases as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form.

Monday

8 sets of chin-up for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

8 sets of power clean for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

8 sets of push press for 3 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

2 sets of side plank hold for 90s
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Note that unlike the previous phase, these are straight sets. You’ll perform all 8 sets of chins for example before moving to the power cleans.

Wednesday

4 sets of forward lunge with hammer curl for 7 reps with each leg
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of dip for 7 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of bent over row for 7 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of front squat for 6 reps

3 sets of good morning for 6 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

2 sets of plank hold for 120 seconds
Rest 45 seconds between each set

Friday

4 sets of dumbbell Romanian deadlift for 10 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of neutral-grip dumbbell shoulder press for 10 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

4 sets of wide-grip pull-up for 8 reps
Rest 60 seconds between each set

4 sets of feet-elevated push-up for 12 reps
Rest 45 seconds between each set

3 sets of back squat for 10 reps
Rest 60 seconds between each set

2 sets of reverse crunch on slant board for 12 reps
Rest 30 seconds between each set

[center] The NEPA Walk [/center]

It’s as simple as this: Go for a walk every day.

The idea here is to drain off a few calories to speed the fat loss process without impairing recovery and without taking any energy away from the weight training workouts. A good walk will actually speed up the recovery process and has been called the simplest form of GPP or General Physical Preparedness.

The key here is to make the decision to walk everyday, rain or shine, busy or not.

Guidelines

  1. The average person walks between 3 and 3.5 MPH. (Men walk about .5 miles per hour faster than women.) For your NEPA walk, shoot for around 4 MPH. If you’re walking outside and not on a treadmill that shows you the speed, simply aim to walk faster than your normal pace. This isn’t “speed walking,” just walking faster than normal.

  2. You can choose to walk for a certain distance or for a certain amount of time. Depending on your fitness level and the time you have, you can shoot for 30 to 60 minutes of fast walking or two to four miles. At 4 MPH, you can walk one mile in 15 minutes.

  3. You may walk outside or inside on a treadmill. Walking on a treadmill actually burns a few less calories than walking outside, but this isn’t a big deal. Simply incline the treadmill slightly and the calorie-burning will be increased as the posterior chain muscles are called into play.

  4. While you can take your walk any time of the day – morning, at lunch, or in the evening – many experts believe that walking in the morning before you eat leads to faster fat loss. While I’d never suggest performing strenuous cardio in this fasted state (which could lead to muscle loss), a brisk walk is fine. Still, it’s no big deal: get your walk in whenever you can, just never miss a day!

Warning: You will not “make the diet faster” by going for long runs, doing sprints, or taking hour-long aerobics classes. You will impede recovery, have less energy, and possibly cause your body to catabolize (eat up) lean muscle tissue, which will in turn wreck your metabolism.

Remember, the diet itself does most of the fat burning here and the weight training builds and/or helps you retain the metabolism-boosting muscle. Traditional cardio and aerobics just aren’t necessary while on the V-Diet, and may even be counterproductive.

Daily NEPA Boosts: Seek Movement

Along with your daily NEPA walk, I want you to “seek movement.” In other words, try to increase your natural NEPA. How?

  • Park farther away from stores or your place of work than you have to. Get a little extra walking in.

  • Take the stairs. If you have to take an escalator, walk it, don’t just ride it.

  • Carry your luggage; don’t roll it.

Sounds simple, but these small daily actions can lead to additional fat loss, long term weight loss maintenance, and improved health. Make them a lifetime habit and your lifetime will be long and lean!

Questions?


#2

I would ditch these workouts for the book and come up with something more realistic, even if slightly less effective…

Waterbury has you trying to monopolize at least three different stations at the gym at the same time. Most of us go to public gyms, and at peak times, this will be IMPOSSIBLE and some of the people that buy your book will not have the expertise to design their own plan (and really, they shouldn’t have to).

Hence, they’ll have to keep on with a brutal diet not knowing if their exercise plan is even effective at preventing catabolism and promoting fat loss. If they have to buy another book or study to overcome the flaws of the lifting program in your book - well, it’ll be just another diet book that fat people pick up to try ‘someday’.

Why someone hasn’t smacked Waterbury over the head and said ‘design a program for people who go to crowded gyms’ is beyond me. The guy is a great trainer has amazing ideas - they just aren’t workable in a crowded gym.

I did day one of the intermediate program last night - you know what happened?

It was impossible to do correctly. First, the pull up bars are either in the cable area (which was crowded beyond all reason at 9PM at night) or UPSTAIRS. Hence, it was impossible to do the pullups (with dip-belt), unload my belt, and RUN down to the deadlift bar in only 30 seconds. My buddy, who had to do the beginner’s program, was even worse off than I. The pull-up bar upstairs is rarely USED, let alone crowded. The pull-down pulleys - everyone uses them! Somebody was ALWAYS commandeering his station, changing his bars, etc. So he was waiting…or changing…or…

And hence, at 9PM on a Wednesday, we couldn’t do Waterbury’s program correctly. Imagine how much worse it would be at 6PM! For some people, this is all the time you’ve got.

For the first time EVER, my workout became a source of real stress in my life - not because of the workout, but because of the totally reasonable expectation that I would fail due to factors completely out of my control.


#3

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/5/5/55848-Iraq.jpg

All I can tell you, Wirewound, is that lots of V-Dieters manage to do the workouts. Do the best you can. Display adaptability:

http://www.t-nation.com/tmagnum/readTopic.do?id=912565

Here’s a pic sent to me by a T-Nation reader who’s doing just that in Iraq when it comes to his training. After seeing this, I personally don’t gripe about my gym anymore.


#4

Yeah…

If I try ‘being adaptive’, I end up just not going. I’m not making excuses, I’m saying that I know myself. My feeling is that things should be just as difficult as they need to be, but no more. Efficiency leads to a clear mind.

It’s the same reason I don’t work out at home - too many distractions. The only distractions at the gym are hot girls in lycra.

You’re right, though - not everyone is like me.


#5

After seeing that pic I am inspired! I also feel kind of wierd now, using my Oly set and power rack — like driving by starving kids while I’m in my limo.

Thanks for making the workouts a seperate sticky.


#6

[quote]wirewound wrote:
Yeah…

If I try ‘being adaptive’, I end up just not going. I’m not making excuses, I’m saying that I know myself. My feeling is that things should be just as difficult as they need to be, but no more. Efficiency leads to a clear mind.

It’s the same reason I don’t work out at home - too many distractions. The only distractions at the gym are hot girls in lycra.

You’re right, though - not everyone is like me. [/quote]

wirewound, you raise an excellent point. And while the quality of ideas presented by T-Nation authors speak for themselves, I get a sense sometimes they need to get a better grasp of what most readers deal with.

Exactly. Any program that is designed with the expectation that a reader will be able to tie up (multiple!) stations in a public gym is not thought through with consideration.

One author in a book I bought, and who’s ideas I respect, actually suggested that one way of ‘getting around’ the logistics of his program is to “consider the benefits of a home gym”. Oh-kaay… so first I buy the book and dvd, now I gotta buy a house and furnish it with a gym. Why these limitations?


#7

Just find another workout that suits your situation. The V-Diet was been successful for a LONG time without and real “prescribed” workout. A lot of people kept asking what workout to do with the diet and CW was good enough to design one that he felt best complimented the diet. The main thing is that you get some resistance training in. Find one that suits your needs and where you train and roll with it.


#8

I am curious why were supposed to perform the exercises as “fast as we can”? I am assuming the short tut with the V-Diet will help sustain muscle compared to longer tut. Is this correct?


#9

I’ve been making it work at a 24-hour fatness during peak hours. Although, I have been doing the advanced version, which is mostly free weight based, so I don’t use a bunch of machines. I also felt free to substitute similar exercises for convenience. For example, in the CG bench / BB curl / Front squat triset, I didn’t want to have to change weights/move the bar in the power rack, drag a bench in, etc, so I replaced the CG bench with DB floor press. Not exactly the same, but close enough.


#10

[quote]jasonshadow wrote:
I am curious why were supposed to perform the exercises as “fast as we can”? I am assuming the short tut with the V-diet will help sustain muscle compared to longer tut. Is this correct?[/quote]

That’s a basic Waterbury principle actually. Here’s a full article with details:


#11

The idea behind the “official” workouts seems to be to go heavy to preserve muscle while at the same time going in circuit fashion to increase calorie burning.

I wonder if doing heavy barbell complexes (see articles by Alwyn Cosgrove) would be a good choice for those who are forced to workout in commercial gyms during peak hours. The great thing with complexes is you use only one barbell with the same weight. Just do them in the squat rack since no one ever uses the squat rack except for the occassional curler.

Yeah, I know we’re supposed to follow the plan as written for best results and we should make every effort to adapt and overcome. This is just an idea I’m throwing out for discussion.

BTW - A home gym is more realistic than you think, provided you’re willing to do minimalist workouts. Start by buying an cheap Olympic weight set at a sporting good store. They’ll run you around $100-$150.

Yes, they weights will probably be off and the bar will probably be crap, but that’s not what we’re worried about. Unless you live in an extraordinarily tiny apartment, I bet most of you could find room for an Olympic bar.

What can you do with just a bar and some plates? Deadlift, Romanian deadlift, barbell hack squat, clean and press, row, skull crushers while lying on the floor, standing barbell curl, and any of the complexes in Cosgrove’s articles. What else do you need?


#12

One more thing. I recall reading once that Chad said his 10x3 for Fat Loss plan would work with the V-Diet. He wrote this a while ago so I’m not sure if he still recommends this or not. That plan uses straight sets with short rest intervals. It’s fairly demanding, but you only do two sessions per week.


#13

I work out in a commercial gym (at peak hours more often than I’d like) and it wasn’t terribly difficult to complete the advanced program listed above. The key is organizing everything prior to each circuit so you can just hit one thing after another. I had to clean the bar from the floor on front and overhead squats in order to not have someone jump in the squat rack and steal my bar when I’m off doing the other lifts in the circuit.


#14

just walk around with an angry face between exercises and if someone jumps in tell them you’re doing circuits. who gives a rats ass what other people think or are doing. if you’re sweating like a beast (you should be) most people will just gripe about you taking up stations on their 15 min rest in between sets of 15lb db curls. OCCASIONALLY you’ll find someone doing something mildly difficult and actually putting some intensity into it. now i’m not saying i go balls to the wall every workout, but I put a lot of fucking effort into it.

you’re on the V-Diet, fucking go as hard as you can and grab the station while it’s empty and throw a towel on the seat or something. the V-Diet has definitely taught me something about working out with intensity, by that i mean that it’s possible to workout with high intensity on low cals and carbs. i say screw everyone else. the gym time is your time.

now about the deads to pullups issue. i don’t have an answer. but you could just work up to a max on deads and then go between dips and pullups. look, ANY heavy, intense weight training is going to preserve muscle which is the ultimate goal. this is calle the V-DIET after all not the v-training program. as had been said before there is no ULTIMATE PROGRAM so as long as you’re lifting heavy shit you’re good. look at Shugart’s original workouts.


#15

Another thing to remember is that most of the circuits don’t last very long, so you won’t be taking up the equipment for too long (even if it FEELS like forever). 4 circuits of 3 movements, 30 secs. rest, takes about 12-15 minutes. Then you move on.


#16

[quote]Scotacus wrote:
wirewound wrote:
Yeah…

If I try ‘being adaptive’, I end up just not going. I’m not making excuses, I’m saying that I know myself. My feeling is that things should be just as difficult as they need to be, but no more. Efficiency leads to a clear mind.

It’s the same reason I don’t work out at home - too many distractions. The only distractions at the gym are hot girls in lycra.

You’re right, though - not everyone is like me.

wirewound, you raise an excellent point. And while the quality of ideas presented by T-Nation authors speak for themselves, I get a sense sometimes they need to get a better grasp of what most readers deal with.

My feeling is that things should be just as difficult as they need to be, but no more.

Exactly. Any program that is designed with the expectation that a reader will be able to tie up (multiple!) stations in a public gym is not thought through with consideration.

One author in a book I bought, and who’s ideas I respect, actually suggested that one way of ‘getting around’ the logistics of his program is to “consider the benefits of a home gym”. Oh-kaay… so first I buy the book and dvd, now I gotta buy a house and furnish it with a gym. Why these limitations?[/quote]

If you look at the advanced program, the first day can be done entirely at a squat rack, the next day, entirely at a bench, and the last day with the exception of the slant board crunches can be done entirely at a squat rack. All you need to do is bring some dumbbells with you.

All over the different forums you read about people who ask “what about doing the V-Diet with celery between shakes, or a piece of salmon with the second shake.” The bottom line is that the velocity diet is about stepping out of management of our physique plan ( because if our management decisions worked, we would not need anymore help!), so when we finish we will have a new design for living not just on paper, but the strength to actually implement it in our lives.

If the soldier in Iraq complete his workout without any “right” equipment, and more stress in his life than any of us here at home, I think that we can all find a way at 6pm in a large commercial gym.


#17

I have a question about the official workouts… I think I’m the intermediate level but I definitely cannot do the workout as written yet because of the pullup/chinup portion. I would imagine that other women would be in my situation as well- I’ve lifted for a while but never really worked on pullups- combine that with my excess fat and it’s definitely a weak point. I can now officially do a real pullup (2 even) but I’m certainly not going to be able to do sets of 3 in a circuit, nor will I be able to sets of 8 chin ups. I’m just not there yet as much as I would like to be.

I do think that I fall into the intermediate category though because of my experience (I’ve lifted for years on and off through my collegiate athletic career), so I didn’t want to just use the beginner level because I can’t do the chins/pullups as listed.

I see a couple options and was hoping someone could give me feedback on which to go with.

  1. do the chins/pullups as listed but just go to failure each time (I think this would be pretty tough and probably is not the intent)
  2. replace with pulldowns
  3. use an assisted machine
  4. do the beginner level
  5. use a different Waterbury workout

so what do you guys think? any suggestions?

(oh and i editted this post in case anyone was confused- i wasn’t sure at first if these workouts could be used for men and women, but i see now that the beginner level is indeed what tropicalshoes used during her clinic)


#18

it’s really not that complicated. don’t worry so much about little shit like going to failure. as long as it’s intense, full body, with little rest and you’re maintaining the load you’ll be fine. maybe take the last set to balls the wall failure. AS HEAVY AS POSSIBLE weights will tell your body to keep the muscle even on low calories especially with Surge + HRX + BCAA’s. btw Surge is like candy! i love that stuff.

oh and most of my post only applies to people who have some knowledge of lifting weights. if you’re a complete newbie then you probably should get a little weight training under your belt before attempting the V-Diet. just my 2.


#19

[quote]kakattack wrote:
I have a question about the official workouts… I think I’m the intermediate level but I definitely cannot do the workout as written yet because of the pullup/chinup portion. I would imagine that other women would be in my situation as well- I’ve lifted for a while but never really worked on pullups- combine that with my excess fat and it’s definitely a weak point. \

[/quote]

Hey girl. I started the intermediate workout Tuesday. I used the assisted machine for my pullups and dips. I don’t see anything wrong with that as long as you are 'Using the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets; like the workout says.

It’s a load off my mind to see that other people are having trouble keeping their spot while they do their circuits. And Cpcloud said it perfectly:
“just walk around with an angry face between exercises and if someone jumps in tell them you’re doing circuits. who gives a rats ass what other people think or are doing. if you’re sweating like a beast (you should be) most people will just gripe about you taking up stations on their 15 min rest in between sets of 15lb db curls.”

Tuesday I snuck in and took a barbell from a couple of 12yr olds who were screwing around, carried it over to the assisted machine. Did my pullups hopped down did my DL, then hopped back up and did the dips. But I digress…Yes do the intermediate. You say you have lifting experience and this workout is for you! Good luck!


#20

[quote]Kurlie26 wrote:

Hey girl. I started the intermediate workout Tuesday. I used the assisted machine for my pullups and dips. I don’t see anything wrong with that as long as you are 'Using the heaviest load you can manage with perfect form for all sets; like the workout says.
[/quote]

thanks kurlie! it’s good to get some feedback from the ladies. i was thinking of just doing the assisteds… but i’m a pretty firm believer in doing the motion if you can (maybe this is wrong though???).

In my experience with dips at least, I’ve gotten a lot better a lot faster doing real dips with a poor range of motions (I started just holding myself up- then progressed to doing 1/4 way, then halfway, then 3/4 until i could do real dips) than I ever have using the assisted machine. I hate how much it takes away from the exercise- I feel it in totally different ways.

I’m not sure how the assisteds helped me with pullups though- I thought I was a further away from doing them than I was. About 6 weeks into my last workout routine, which was back heavy and did include assisted pullups for the first time (i was kind of prepping to use Leigh’s pullup program), I decided to try to do a pullup and all of a sudden I could! I dont know if i just needed a few weeks of assisteds to get used to the motion or if it was the increased back work or the decreased fat (I’m sure it was a function of all of these!). But anyways, the point is I wasn’t able to monitor how assiteds helped me in this case like I was with dips, especially since this is the first time in my life I’ve even ever thought pullups were an option for me!

So I guess my very long point is that overall I’m not a big fan of assisted pulls/chins/dips and would prefer not to resort to that if possible. But maybe my bias is totally off base- I’m hoping someone can tell me!! I just feel like you progress so much better when trying to do the real thing.

Of course, the v-diet is a very different/specialized situation- so I’m just not sure what makes the most sense! assisteds? failure? substitution?

Anyone else have a take on this?

Thanks again Kurlie- can’t wait to keep seeing your progress. Get those shakes down :slight_smile: