Biotest

Sushi Zero


#1

[center]Sushi Zero [/center]
People often asked me, “Chris, why did you learn to cook?” Well, several reasons. Here are three of them:

  1. Because I love to eat and I like to get full.

Carrot sticks and lettuce? No thanks. Visible musculature without portion control? Yes, please.

  1. This is the big one really: I taught myself to cook because I don’t want to put my physique and my health goals into someone else’s hands.

I don’t exactly trust Big Food’s idea of “healthy.” Remember those labels making health claims and receiving the “Smart Choices” seal of approval – products that include Froot Loops, a cereal that’s 41% sugar? I rest my case.

What about Big Government? Four words for ya: high-fructose corn syrup. Thank you, corporate welfare.

How about Big Restaurant? I mean, come on, the commercials say that the winter Olympians just thrive off “all white meat chicken” McNuggets. Hmm, funny how that “white meat” is actually made up of seven different ingredients, isn’t it? And that’s not even counting the breading, which takes another 20 mystery ingredients. That stuff makes Big Granny’s homemade fried chicken look like health food.

But hey, at least there’s no dark meat in there! Whew! Trans-fat? Yes. Evil dark meat? No. Thanks for looking out for me, Ronald McDonald!

So, in short, it’s my body and I want to control what I’m fueling it with. Feeding yourself is, after all, basic self-reliance.

Admittedly, this foundational principle can be painful sometimes. Take sushi for example. I love the stuff. My favorite joint is just outside of Dallas. It’s called Tokyo One, and for around $40 you just walk in, grab a plate and eat all you want.

Now, sushi, in its traditional form at least, isn’t all that bad. Sure, it’s carby with all the rice, but not a bad weekend refeed.

Problem is, it’s hard to stick to traditional boring sushi when you have all those new varieties popping up, many of which are filled with fried bits and even covered with calorie-dense creams. Even the rice itself is often mixed with sugar to increase its stickiness.

So what’s a sushi-lovin’ Texan to do? Well, he’s still going to visit Tokyo One when he’s in the Metroplex, but at home he’s going to make zero-carb sushi rolls. (Okay, okay, there’s a carb or two, but not many. Lighten up will ya, Dr. Atkins?)

Check it out, then check the thread below for more pics.

[center] Sushi Zero [/center]
Ingredients

Cold-smoked salmon (a couple packages)
Dried dill or wasabi powder
Package of fat-free cream cheese, brought to room temp
Toasted sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Choose either the dried dill or the wasabi powder. Both taste great so you can’t go wrong. Other herbs or spices would work too, but these are my favorites. Just don’t use wasabi paste that comes in a tube. Lots of nasty crap in the ones I’ve looked at. Mix your dill or wasabi powder with the cream cheese.

Side rant: Recipe books and magazine always add really weird bits of extra info. Like in my last sentence they would have added “… in a medium-sized bowl.”

Really? In a bowl? I was going to mix it in the bathroom sink.

Oh wait, a medium-sized bowl? So glad you told me what size of bowl to choose. I mean sure, I can handle an 8-inch chef’s knife made using the legendary kasumi method, but I would’ve had no friggin’ idea what size bowl to choose if you, the caring and far-more-intelligent-than-I recipe editor, had not told me!

Ok, I feel better.

  1. Place a sheet of Saran Wrap on your cutting board and lay the salmon on it. Spread on a layer of the cream cheese mixture.

  2. Using the plastic wrap to help, roll salmon into a tight pink tube. Yes, this will in fact make you gay, unless you take REZ-V. True fact.

  3. Stick the roll in the freezer for a couple of hours. Begin thumb twiddling and/or Googling the word “shrimping” with your SafeSearch turned off.

  4. Spread out a layer of toasted sesame seeds on your cutting board. Roll your roll through them.

Note: I found some pre-toasted sesame seeds at Whole Foods. If you can’t find them or just don’t like buying food from smelly hippies, then you can find sesame seeds raw along with the dried herbs and spices at your local grocery store. Just heat up a dry pan and toss them around until they turn brown or you start to smell them. If they turn black and the smoke alarm goes off, then go see the smelly hippies.

  1. Slice up your sexy sushi and enjoy.

  2. Feel good knowing that you are self-reliant and people dig you.


#2

Someone said not to use the phrase “food porn.” Therefore I give you… food porn.


#3

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/9/a/9a7b7_ORIG-aaDSCN1139.jpg

Raw materials.


#4

Ready for the freezer.


#5

The slicing can be tricky, even with a wicked sharp knife. I ruined several of them, as you see here, and tragically had to eat my mistakes.


#6

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/d/a/dab3f_ORIG-DSCN1148.jpg

Wasabi powder. Found at Wal-Mart actually, though I did have to leap several fully-mobile people riding mobility devices that slowly cause them to become immobile.

People are weird.


#7

Shug - what’s up with freezing the roll? I assume you let it defrost a little before you roll it in the sesames, right?


#8

.


#9

Finished product.


#10

[quote]ChronosOceanus wrote:
Shug - what’s up with freezing the roll? I assume you let it defrost a little before you roll it in the sesames, right?[/quote]

Mainly it’s to help with the slicing, which is kinda tricky even after freezing.

It won’t freeze through at around 2 hours, but you will want to let it sit at room temp for a few minutes before serving. The ends may be a bit icy otherwise.


#11

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/3/4/344f0_ORIG-DSCN1143.jpg

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#12

That sounds super and simple I will definitely be giving this a try.


#13

THIS I have to try this weekend…nice post! But I think I’ll live dangerously here: I’m going to add a sliced avocado in the middle of the role, and serve it with some freshly sliced ginger (probably a good idea to skip even the natural soy sauce for this one…smoked salmon is usually quite salty all by itself).

And that’s what I love about these quick & simple recipes most - endless permeations.

  • Mike

#14

[quote]MikeManos wrote:
THIS I have to try this weekend…nice post! But I think I’ll live dangerously here: I’m going to add a sliced avocado in the middle of the role, and serve it with some freshly sliced ginger (probably a good idea to skip even the natural soy sauce for this one…smoked salmon is usually quite salty all by itself).

And that’s what I love about these quick & simple recipes most - endless permeations.

  • Mike[/quote]
    Nice touch with the avacado. There is a low sod. version of soy. Still probably not neccessary but it is an opton

#15

Chris, I’m in Dallas. Do you deliver? (insert everyone’s witty sexual innuendo comments here)


#16

[quote]MikeManos wrote:
THIS I have to try this weekend…nice post! But I think I’ll live dangerously here: I’m going to add a sliced avocado in the middle of the role… [/quote]

Avocado FTW. I’m about to try that too.


#17

No Nori wrapping around the sushi? Are you trying to give me cancer or something? It made Bowden’s 150 healthiest foods!


#18

Try leaving it wrapped tightly in the Saran before cutting it. The sushi pros do that with a lot of rolls, and it seems to hold it together for cutting.

And HELLS YEAH on this article. I will be heading to the fish market soon. SO many fishes to try this with…

I like the Nori and avocado ideas. You could also add:

Julienned cucumber.
You could wrap it in a thin sheet of cucmber if you can manage the knife trick to slice it.
Julienned Daikon radish.
Green onions in the cheese.
Siracha chile sauce in the cheese.

Crap, I could go on forever.


#19

Has anyone tried using cauliflower for a rice sub. Just saw it and it looked good any thoughts?


#20

My experience with sesame seeds from a supermarket (or even restaurant supply shops) is that they are invariably stale - toasted or untoasted.

I’ve found that sesame seeds from Whole Foods (as Chris mentioned) are much fresher. Fresly toasted sesame seeds are far superior, but they must be constantly stirred and closely watched because they can go from totally raw to charred and inedible in an instant!

And if you really want to cut something thin, nothing beats a good sushi knife, although they tend to be expensive.