Biotest

Slow-Cooker Stuffed Apples


#1

[center]Slow-Cooker Stuffed Apples [/center]
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It’s like gooey apple pie filling, minus the love handles.

Software

A few apples

Chopped pecans

Chopped dates*

Splenda

Imitation butter flavoring

Ground cinnamon

Ground nutmeg

  • If you can’t find dates in the fresh fruit section, get some pre-chopped in a box over with the dried fruits. They’ll probably be covered with sugar, so just put them in a strainer and rinse.

Hardware

Peeler (or sharp knife and box of Band-Aids)

Apple corer

Slow cooker (Crock Pot)

The Steps

  1. Core out each apple, making sure to get all the seeds. Now peel off the top half of the skin.

  2. In a bowl, mix together the pecans, dates, cinnamon, nutmeg, and Splenda. How much? Depends on how many apples you’re making. But don’t sweat it; you can’t screw this up. Just use as much of each as you want and adjust to taste the next time you make the recipe.

  3. Take your imitation butter flavoring and put a few drops into each apple. I use an eye dropper I bought just for this purpose. Using this potent butter-tasting flavoring instead of real butter knocks a couple hundred calories off this tasty dessert. (Or use some omega-3 Smart Balance if you’d like.)

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  1. Now stuff the cored apples with the mixture of dates, pecans, and flavorings.

  2. Place in a slow cooker and add enough water to cover the bottom third or so of the apples. Cook on high for 2-3 hours or low for 4-6 hours. I tend to stick to the longer cooking times because I like mine super soft and gooey.

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Variation

Like that? Try this: Use pears instead of apples and low-sugar orange juice instead of water in your slow cooker. Stuff with dried cranberries and almonds and flavor it up with ground ginger and a smidge of clove.


#2

Good stuff. Cook’s Illustrated did a (unhealthy, obviously) version of this, and I’m glad you came up with an alternative variation.

For what it’s worth, they said that they preferred the Granny Smith varietal, since it’s got a slightly tart flavor to contrast with the sweeter filling, and its firmer flesh lead to fewer “blowouts”, in which the filling overwhelmed the apple. It’s probably the tartest of the large apples; most of the big boys (Fuji, Gala, Pink Lady) are sweeter, and sometimes have a mealy texture when cooked. Smaller pie varietals are tarter, but good luck stuffing one of those, unless you have surgeon’s hands.

Also, I’d suspect that dried figs might be a good substitute for the dates, and those are rarely sugared. More chopping will be needed, though.


#3

Good ideas and tips.

I’ve never had a blowout in the slow cooker. Oven cooking though… yeah, exploded an eggplant yesterday. It was epic.


#4

Do you core the apple all the way through? Wouldn’t the stuffings fall through the bottom?


#5

I’m suddenly imagining an almond flour crust which I will use with this recipe to make an old-fashioned apple cobbler, minus the love handles.


#6

you can make an almond flour pie crust and pie cover :slight_smile:


#7

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
you can make an almond flour pie crust and pie cover :)[/quote]

Have you had success with something like that? I recently made a chicken pot pie with an almond flour crust, but I only made a cover. I was concerned that an actual crust would turn out soggy. Please share if you know something I don’t!


#8

[quote]firespinner93 wrote:

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
you can make an almond flour pie crust and pie cover :)[/quote]

Have you had success with something like that? I recently made a chicken pot pie with an almond flour crust, but I only made a cover. I was concerned that an actual crust would turn out soggy. Please share if you know something I don’t![/quote]

I have only used the almond flour crust for the bottom of muffins and cheesecakes, never thought it would work as the cover. Apparently we were/are both in the dark.


#9

[quote]Icarus wrote:

[quote]firespinner93 wrote:

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
you can make an almond flour pie crust and pie cover :)[/quote]

Have you had success with something like that? I recently made a chicken pot pie with an almond flour crust, but I only made a cover. I was concerned that an actual crust would turn out soggy. Please share if you know something I don’t![/quote]

I have only used the almond flour crust for the bottom of muffins and cheesecakes, never thought it would work as the cover. Apparently we were/are both in the dark.
[/quote]

Take the pizza crust recipe (almond flour or coconut) and when it’s time to flip the crust, flip it onto the pie. Make sure the crust is slightly bigger than the pie pan and bake until the top side is brown.