Biotest

Simple Salt & Pepper Okra


#1

[center] Simple Salt & Pepper Okra [/center]
The human body experiences a couple of sensations that are classified as “sensual desires.”

One of them, as you may have guessed, involves our naughty parts and sensitive bits.

But the other sensual desires may surprise you: eating and hunger.

That’s right, hunger, cravings, flavors, and the love of food are in fact “sensual,” even lighting up some of the same areas of the brain as nekid-time. No wonder it’s so difficult to resist fattening, gut-busting foods. Food really is “sex in your mouth.”

One of the most powerful effects of <a href="http://www.T-Nation.com/programs/vdiet30/vDietProgram000.jsp"target=“new”>Velocity Diet 3.0 is a reawakening of the taste buds. I believe that most people have been desensitized to the remarkable natural flavors of healthy foods. I believe this is caused by the typical American diet: over-chemicalized, fried, MSG-laden, and overly-sugary.

The main side effect reported by successful V-Dieters is a new love of healthful foods and a new distaste for unhealthy foods. In other words, after a strict V-Diet, the dieter reports loving steamed veggies while at the same time ridding himself or herself of cravings for sugars and trans-fats.

Which of course is awesome. It almost guarantees long-term leanness post-V-Diet as the person is back in control of his eating habits.

So, although it’s counterintuitive, a diet consisting almost entirely of protein shakes turns most people into “foodies” – the best kind of foodies: those who love natural, healthy flavors. The V-Diet simply re-awakens and re-sensitizes the taste buds.

With all that said, here’s one of my favorite recipes, something I crave and love these days, but wouldn’t have even tried before doing the V-Diet.

Simple Salt & Pepper Okra

Ingredients:

Fresh whole okra
Olive oil (I use Mazola Pure in the spray can)
Pink sea salt or kosher salt
Fresh ground pepper

Directions:

Spray a pan with olive oil. Add okra. Do NOT cut it, which is what creates that slimy mouth-feel that gives okra a bad rap. Add salt and pepper. Flip after a couple of minutes. Kill the heat and add a touch more olive oil if you’d like. Eat and have a tonguegasm.

Notes:

  • Fresh ground pepper is crucial. Never use pre-ground pepper. Buy peppercorns and a grinder and grind your own as you need it, or just pick up a McCormick Grinder, sold at every grocery store in the spice section. The difference between pre-ground pepper (tastes like ashes) and fresh-ground pepper (oily and rich) is like night and day.

  • I like to use a cast iron grill press to get a bit of a sear on my okra. Pic below.

  • If you’re dieting you can eat a pile of these to combat hunger. I make these as “TV food” instead eating chips and other garbage. I eat them with my fingers, like snack foods. (Again, cutting okra = sliminess.) And sometimes I’ll have a handful or two before going out on the weekend so I’ll resist any dietary temptations of the singles scene. Make some salt & pepper okra an hour before hitting a restaurant and you’ll be more likely to stick to the grilled salmon and steak and less likely to tackle the dessert cart.

  • FYI, Okra has only about 20 calories per half-cup serving and a couple of grams of fiber.

Try it tonight. Put it in your mouth. Put it in someone else’s mouth.

Get sensual, baby.


#2

Grill press method.


#3

No slime here, just satiating tastiness.


#4

Awesome idea and great advice, Mr Shugart!

I do a very similar thing with fresh - or store bought, if that’s the only option - garden zuchini, except I use an 18-8 stainless steel pan*.

*The reason is that once you start cooking strictly in stainless, the taste is much different (and better, IMO) than teflon coated. I started this habit with my morning eggs, but it works equally well with anything that you like crispy on the outside, and it sears quite beautifully as well. Be forewarned though: It’s a very touchy feely practice cooking in stainless, and will first require some getting accustomed to if you are used to using teflon coated.

But I digress…

I imagine broccoli and various other veggies are great this way also, but I haven’t tried them yet. Another thing that I love to do, in addition to fresh ground sea salt and black pepper, is freshly sliced and diced garlic. Basically, just ginsu this stuff beforehand down to as small as your patience will allow, and cook it until slightly browned (or to your own preference) before adding the vegetables.

And yes, this is not a good idea if you are single and going out later…unless she’s Italian or Greek, that is. :slight_smile:

Happy cooking to all.

  • Mike

#5

Mike: I like stainless pans too. Probably healthier than nonstick coatings in the long run. That would work fine for this preparation.

And while I haven’t tried it yet, it should work well on the outdoor grill too. Works very well on my Lodge cast iron grill pan and leaves nice sear marks if you’re cooking for others and care about presentation.


#6

Excellent summer snack alternative:

Cold Cucumber Sticks:

  • Freeze a cucumber for about 30 mins.
  • Slice it length wise into thick strips/quarters
  • Squeeze a lemon over the segments
  • Sprinkle salt and pepper over the segments
  • Toss them around a bit

Sooo good on hot summer days.


#7

I’ve got a row of okra in the garden that is steady producing despite the heat. Will give this a try tonight.


#8

Okra’s great, but infinitely better with cumin and coriander.


#9

[quote]AlisaV wrote:
Okra’s great, but infinitely better with cumin and coriander. [/quote]

I’ll have to try that. Thanks.


#10

If anybody is hesitant to give up their no-stick teflon, I’ll pass along this tip I learned from an Oriental cooking show on TV. The cook said “Hot pan, cold oil, food no stick.” I use stainless steel pans, and this trick is even better than using teflon pans. The pan needs to be very clean and smooth. (I don’t think this works very well with textured cast iron; machined and seasoned cast iron should be good though.) Get the pan hot first, then put the oil in. I use coconut oil for its high smoke point. Olive oil will burn if the pan is too hot. EVOO takes some experimentation to get the temp right.

Don’t splash it though.


#11

If olive oil burns it turns sour and will ruin whatever you are cooking in it. This is why when I teach my friends how to make pasta sauce, to use a low or never go over medium heat.

Great contributions everyone, I am getting hungry reading all these and my next meal is not for another 45 min damn you all.


#12

The recipe sounds great! I’ll try it the next time I pick up some okra. Thanks for the idea!

I have made a similar one only I mix a little sesame seed oil in with the olive oil and I broil it in the toaster oven instead of using a pan. Gotta love okra!


#13

I’m nearing the end of Transition Week 1 on the V-Diet. Mr. Shugart is right: it does make you like veggies and hate processed sugary junk.

So far, I have been all about the grilled zucchini and green beans. I even love brussels sprouts. I will try this okra recipe too. However, I still cannot eat broccoli. I hated it when I was three and I hate it now. Besides dumping “industrialized cheese product” on it, do you have a good broccoli recipe?


#14

This thread is surprisingly sexy… ummm.


#15

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Mike: I like stainless pans too. Probably healthier than nonstick coatings in the long run. That would work fine for this preparation.

And while I haven’t tried it yet, it should work well on the outdoor grill too. Works very well on my Lodge cast iron grill pan and leaves nice sear marks if you’re cooking for others and care about presentation.
[/quote]

I have a cast iron frying pan and find it much better than a stainless steel. Food sticks less and heat distribution is more even.


#16

I just finished your okra recipe prepared exactly as written. It was awesome. Thanks.


#17

[quote]gamarz wrote:
I just finished your okra recipe prepared exactly as written. It was awesome. Thanks.[/quote]

Good deal. I just had a batch myself. Used lemon pepper and sea salt this time. Seared it in cast iron. Rocked!


#18

Grilled Asparagus
Broiled Okra
Pan Seared Zucchini
Vinegar Cucumbers in Olive Oil
Pickled Cabbage salad
Smoked Kabobs

time for lunch


#19

#20