Biotest

Rutabaga Mashed 'Potatoes'


#1

[center]It’s a Rutabaga, Dammit [/center]

“What is this, a coconut?” the checker at the grocery store asked.

“It’s a rutabaga,” I said.

“A what?”

“A rutabaga.”

She sighed, pulled out a notebook and began to search for a picture of the mysterious root vegetable and the corresponding checkout code.

[i]Flip.

Flip.

Flip.[/i]

“Ah, here it is,” she said finally. “No wait, that’s a potato.”

[i]Flip.

Flip.

Flip[/i].

A line began to form behind me.

“Are you sure it’s not a coconut? Jicama maybe?” she said.

“Listen, the code for rutabaga is 4747. It’s 76 cents. Trust me on this.”

She looked up at me skeptically. “Um, you know the code?” she said, as if this were privileged information only revealed to Wal-Mart employees after a Skull and Bones-style secret initiation held in the dark of night.

“Yeah,” I replied, “this happens a lot.”

And it’s true. No one, especially the checkers at my usual grocery store, seems to know what the heck rutabagas are. And that’s too bad. Because if you make them part of your V-Life eating plan, they’ll help you stay lean and be very happy at meal time.

Rutabagas, sometimes called Swedish turnips, earn a few paragraphs in Dr. Jonny Bowden’s fantastic book, The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth. Although the taste and texture will remind you of a sweet potato, it’s more of a big fat turnip, part of the cabbage family actually, and thus has some cool anti-cancer properties. Rutabagas are low in calories so they’re great for volumizing a meal. Carbs are pretty low too and fiber is high. Nice.

Here are two quickie ways to cook 'em up:

Mashed “Potatoes”

Strip off the waxy skin with a potato peeler and cut into one-inch cubes. Pop them into the steamer basket and steam until they soften. Move to a bowl, add some omega-3 enriched butter, salt and pepper, and run a hand mixer or potato masher through them until you get a mashed-potato consistency. One of my favorite side dishes!

Roasted Rutabaga

Peel off the skin and cut into cubes. Spray with olive oil, add salt and pepper, and place them onto a flat pan. Pop 'em in the oven for 20 minutes or so at 400 degrees until they’re soft in the center and a little crisp on the outside. (Flip halfway through cooking.)

If you have a french fry cutter, you can also make rutabaga steak fries. Same thing as above really, just in a more familiar shape.

Rutabaga makes a great addition to <a href="http://velocity.tmuscle.com/free_online_program/sports_body_training_diet_velocity/velocity_diet_30#velocity-diet-3-0"target=“new”>V-Diet HSMs too. Give it a shot and let me know what you think!

And remember, the code is 4747. You’ll need it.


#2

That looks really good. I’ve never actually had a Rutabaga before.


#3

I am going to try em for sure. I have not had one either. Thanks for the tips.


#4

My wife has challenged me to make a rutabaga pizza crust (like my cauliflower crust) and a rutabaga pastaless lasagna. That may be pushing it, but I’m going to give it a shot!


#5

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/e/6/e6b87_ORIG-chayote_palya.jpg

Thanks for this, since I usually stay away from things like potatoes I really like finding foods that have a similar texture. You should try CHAYOTE (vegetable pear) if you haven’t. When boiled it tastes just like potatoes. They can be found at most markets.

132 Grams
Calories 25 Calories from Fat 2
Total Fat 0.2g
Total Carbohydrates 6.0g
Dietary Fiber 2.2g
Sugars 2.2g


#6

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
Thanks for this, since I usually stay away from things like potatoes I really like finding foods that have a similar texture. You should try CHAYOTE (vegetable pear) if you haven’t. When boiled it tastes just like potatoes. They can be found at most markets.

132 Grams
Calories 25 Calories from Fat 2
Total Fat 0.2g
Total Carbohydrates 6.0g
Dietary Fiber 2.2g
Sugars 2.2g [/quote]

Interesting. I’ll check that out!

Thanks.


#7

Excellent stuff. Here is a quick snap of my dinner this evening: lean turkey burger with a side of rutafries!


#8

[quote]BrickCallahan wrote:
Excellent stuff. Here is a quick snap of my dinner this evening: lean turkey burger with a side of rutafries![/quote]

Looks great!


#9

Hey Chris, this is kind of off topic but the comment about a pizza crust reminded me. How did your almond flour pizza crust turn out taste-wise? I ask because I’ve made almond flour bread using the sweet flax bread recipe and it tasted like awesome corn bread. Just wondered how you thought it worked for pizza.


#10

[quote]Weevo wrote:
Hey Chris, this is kind of off topic but the comment about a pizza crust reminded me. How did your almond flour pizza crust turn out taste-wise? I ask because I’ve made almond flour bread using the sweet flax bread recipe and it tasted like awesome corn bread. Just wondered how you thought it worked for pizza.[/quote]

You nailed it. Very much a cornbread taste. I basically used the biscotti recipe, took out the sweet ingredients and replaced then with savory (oregano etc.)


#11

Did it work well for pizza? I’m contemplating HSM options here.

Also, I listened to an old episode of Fitcast on iTunes where you were interviewed and you mentioned a book on the V-Diet. Any word on that?


#12

[quote]Weevo wrote:
Did it work well for pizza? I’m contemplating HSM options here.

Also, I listened to an old episode of Fitcast on iTunes where you were interviewed and you mentioned a book on the V-Diet. Any word on that?[/quote]

I prefer the cauliflower crust.

The V-Diet book became this site, basically.


#13

Last night’s rutabaga “chips”. Served with dipping sauces and baked salmon.


#14

You think that’s bad?

My wife went in looking for raisins one day and couldn’t find them, she asked a clerk and he (maybe 16 yrs old) took her to the raisinettes.

My boss’ GF bought some broccoli from the same place and the cashier didn’t know what it was. Unreal


#15

I can forgive the Rutabaga. How do you not know what raisins are or broccoli.

Shame, shame, shame.


#16

I have to admit, I have never actually seen a Rutabaga before. But broccoli, that’s like the most famous vegetable of all time because everyone loves to hate it.


#17

I love to eat Broccoli, as long as it has been cooked- sorry I can’t do the raw broccoli, it’s just not very good.


#18

Just tried the “mashed potatoes” and really like it - even better than the cauliflower version.

Thanks for the new food addition, Chris!


#19

[quote]Tech9 wrote:
Just tried the “mashed potatoes” and really like it - even better than the cauliflower version.

Thanks for the new food addition, Chris![/quote]

Very cool!

Here’s lunch today: it’s the “Flourless Pizza, Finally” recipe, only with half cauliflower, half rutabaga for the crust. Rocked.

Next, all rutabaga.


#20

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
I love to eat Broccoli, as long as it has been cooked- sorry I can’t do the raw broccoli, it’s just not very good.[/quote]

I agree with you there. Simply steaming it and adding salt/pepper (or lemon pepper, FTW) makes a remarkable difference compared to raw.