Biotest

Questions About Velocity Diet (First Timer)


#1

Saw a tweet about the V-Diet ebook and just downloaded it. Will have to read later as work and stuff, ya know.

Anyway, I do have some questions about the diet. Frankly, if it isn’t feasible for me or doesn’t deliver “promised” results, it’s not worth doing, ya know?

First: can anyone point to confirmation of the claims that the V-Diet helps reduce cravings for crap food? My biggest problems are that I’m not a good cook and my logistics around meal prep suck, and even more worrisome, I feel like I’m “addicted” to fast food like burger king, mcdonald’s, taco cabana, etc. If the V-Diet can help kill those addictions, HELL YES I’m going to do it. But if not, why expend the effort and spend the money?

Second: I fully expect there to be some form of cravings in my body while it essentially “detoxes” through this diet. How can I plan for and deal with those cravings when they come up? Note that I’m quite sure it isn’t psychological as I’ve been dealing with a psychologist on that piece and think I’ve got a handle on it finally; in my case I really think it’s some kind of chemical mix in my blood and brain.

Finally: Is it safe to continue the v-diet for more than 4 weeks at a time? I say this because right now I’m at about 250, having started at about 290 a few months ago (most of my “loss” has been through supplements and weight training). Once I’ve got rid of the cravings for bad food, I need to keep going to lose more body fat. I’d like to be able to use the V-Diet semi long term, maybe swapping out the shakes for HSM’s gradually over the course of months to follow, and jacking up healthy calorie intake as needed.

I’ve grown up overweight my whole life (I’m male, 6’0", 32, from Texas). I’m starting to finally understand that my weight problem is not only psychological, but chemical and physiological too. If the V-Diet can help get rid of cravings through a form of “detox” and actually show me some good progress, I think it’ll be the swift kick in the pants I need for a long-term transformation. But any worthwhile transformation, I fully believe, happens INSIDE first. That’s why I’m hoping the cravings go away; once that’s done, the rest should be relatively simple.

Thanks for any information you can provide, it’s appreciated.


#2

I just finished up 4 weeks and am doing 2 more. I was able to lose 13 pounds (210-197). Hopefully I can help.

[quote]superduperdude wrote:
Saw a tweet about the V-Diet ebook and just downloaded it. Will have to read later as work and stuff, ya know.

Anyway, I do have some questions about the diet. Frankly, if it isn’t feasible for me or doesn’t deliver “promised” results, it’s not worth doing, ya know? [/quote]

The results aren’t promised. They’re earned. The diet isn’t a walk in the park, but I do believe it’s worth it. It’s very easy to follow.

[quote]
First: can anyone point to confirmation of the claims that the V-Diet helps reduce cravings for crap food? My biggest problems are that I’m not a good cook and my logistics around meal prep suck, and even more worrisome, I feel like I’m “addicted” to fast food like burger king, mcdonald’s, taco cabana, etc. If the V-Diet can help kill those addictions, HELL YES I’m going to do it. But if not, why expend the effort and spend the money? [/quote]

I didn’t notice a complete reduction in cravings. I still craved certain things, but I also think that’s an individual thing. Your results may very.

[quote]
Second: I fully expect there to be some form of cravings in my body while it essentially “detoxes” through this diet. How can I plan for and deal with those cravings when they come up? Note that I’m quite sure it isn’t psychological as I’ve been dealing with a psychologist on that piece and think I’ve got a handle on it finally; in my case I really think it’s some kind of chemical mix in my blood and brain. [/quote]

Follow the diet to the letter. My suggestion would be to pick 4-5 Healthy Solid Meals (HSM) within the 400-700 calorie range and simply rotate them for the 4 weeks. That way you won’t have to think about anything, you’ll just do it.

Results can be just as addicting as drugs, imo. When you start to notice changes in the mirror, scale, etc… a lot of people find that sensation more satisfying than Burger King.

[quote]
Finally: Is it safe to continue the v-diet for more than 4 weeks at a time? I say this because right now I’m at about 250, having started at about 290 a few months ago (most of my “loss” has been through supplements and weight training). Once I’ve got rid of the cravings for bad food, I need to keep going to lose more body fat. I’d like to be able to use the V-Diet semi long term, maybe swapping out the shakes for HSM’s gradually over the course of months to follow, and jacking up healthy calorie intake as needed. [/quote]
I don’t see why not. I’m working on week 5 now. You’re getting plenty of protein and fat and the carbs hits during training are great.

[quote]
I’ve grown up overweight my whole life (I’m male, 6’0", 32, from Texas). I’m starting to finally understand that my weight problem is not only psychological, but chemical and physiological too. If the V-Diet can help get rid of cravings through a form of “detox” and actually show me some good progress, I think it’ll be the swift kick in the pants I need for a long-term transformation. But any worthwhile transformation, I fully believe, happens INSIDE first. That’s why I’m hoping the cravings go away; once that’s done, the rest should be relatively simple.

Thanks for any information you can provide, it’s appreciated.[/quote]

290 to 250 is damn good progress so far. You seem to be on the right track. Why not just give it a try? What’s the worst that could happen?


#3

Why not just give it a try? What’s the worst that could happen?

Well said. Order placed. Let’s do this.


#4

Good answers above.

Let me add that based on all my research, the loss or reduction in cravings is primarily “cured” through abstinence (from the problematic foods) and time.

The V-Diet is 28 days long, and most physical/brain-based addictions to foods, ingredients or combinations thereof begin to fade and disappear in less than 28 days. As little as 3-4 days with some things. Psychologically it could be longer and that includes general bad dietary habits. But 28 days tends to cover most issues for most people, and with the new V-Diet it can be extended to last longer than 28 days if needed.

The book “The End of Overeating” is really eye-opening when it comes to food addictions. Highly recommended.

Now, let me add this. There is and always will be a point during the abstinence/time period where you just have to get tough. You simply have to grit your teeth and fight and let time do its thing.

For some people this is pretty easy, for others it’s much harder. But I firmly believe that human beings are capable of not putting crap in their mouths until they reach a point where they simply no longer want to put crap in their mouths.

There are tons of techniques and tricks people use to get over their addictions and food issues, but nothing can replace just sacking up and grinding through it until you are “healed.” This is why I write about getting angry with yourself in the ebook. Anger is the spark that creates the fire of change.


#5

My own 2 cents on the craving issue:
I’m on day 22 of my first time through the V-Diet, and I havent felt a craving since day 9. Well, that’s not exactly true. I still crave things, but I find myself craving chicken and sweet potatoes. Stuff like that.
Before the V-Diet, my biggest issue with clean eating was candy. I had a hard time staying away from it. Now I don’t even care. Candy can back to hell where it came from.