Biotest

Outback Steakhouse Dressing


#1

[center] I Love/Hate You, Outback Steakhouse[/center]
For we shallow, physique-conscious gym monkeys and obsessive-compulsive health freaks, there’s no better place to eat out at night than a good steakhouse. Back when I was formulating the <a href="http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_program/sports_body_training_diet_velocity/velocity_diet_30?utm_medium=Banner&utm_content=HomePage&utm_campaign=vDiet"target=“new”>Velocity Diet, I had three of my four HSMs (healthy solid meals) at steakhouses.

Why? Because you can easily get a nice big sirloin, a salad, a side of steamed veggies, and a sweet potato there. Good protein, good greens, and a decent starch. Not bad, especially compared to some restaurants where the only “healthy” thing they offer is a glass of water and a pile of questionable lettuce.

Problem is, steakhouses are full of health-destroying, abs-wrecking foods as well, so you have to go in with a plan and be able to resist the baskets of free bread and deep-fried appetizers.

One such creature is the “Bloomin’ Onion,” a near-3000 calorie appetizer that combines over 200 grams of bad fats with about 200 grams of fried-flour carbs. This and its cousin, the “Awesome Blossom” at Chili’s, have been named one of the worst foods in American by Men’s Health magazine.

Now, this is really not that big of a worry. I mean, the solution is pretty simple: don’t freakin’ order it. Thing is, restaurants know that to get repeat business their foods have to taste really good. No shit, right? But to achieve that, they sometimes slip things into your healthier choices that you may not know about.

For example, ever had a side of green beans at a restaurant and think, “Wow, I’d eat a lot more vegetables if they all tasted like this!” Well, that’s because that innocent side of veggies is often covered with a mixture of fat and sugar. And remember, this combo, according to the fantastic book, The End of Overeating by Dr. David Kessler, triggers an addiction-like reaction that short-circuits our satiety mechanisms.

Yep, if you don’t say “steamed” then you’re probably getting a few hundred extra calories from bad sources that you weren’t expecting. Now, I don’t blame restaurants for wanting to make you really enjoy their food, but adding “secret” sugar to veggies and meats is tricky business for those of us who give a rip about how we look and our health.

Salad dressings can be tricky too. I always have to laugh when some misguided dieter chastises me for ordering a big steak while she eats a “healthier” salad that contains more fat, sugar, and overall calories than my sirloin. But we can fix that.

Outback Steakhouse is known for their signature tangy tomato dressing. People go crazy for this stuff, and no wonder: it contains the magic mixture of fat and sugar.

Here’s my lightened up version. Put it side by side with the real version and I bet you can’t tell the difference.

[center]Outback Tangy Tomato Dressing, Healthed-Up[/center]
2/3 cup reduced-sugar or “1-Carb” ketchup
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup Splenda or XyloSweet
1/4 cup white vinegar
2 tablespoons extra-virgin organic olive oil
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1 pinch thyme
1 dash natural sea salt (RealSalt)

Directions:

Combine everything in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, whisking often, then reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Cover until cool, then refrigerate it until chilled. I like to store mine in cleaned-out vinegar bottles.

Low-calorie, almost no sugar, healthy olive oil… now this will make you increase your vegetable consumption! Great on chicken as well.

Sorry, Outback.


Salad Dressing Recipes
Salad Dressing Recipes
#2

The “before” pic.


#3

During…


#4

…and after.


#5

This stuff really makes leftovers come together too.

Here’s leftover spinach salad, leftover beer-can chicken, and leftover Ezekiel bread, using the tangy tomato dressing instead of mayo.


#6

Finally something I can make at home to put on my chicken breasts! Thanks for the idea Chris. Will be making this for sure.

Does it taste hot/spicy along with being tangy?


#7

omgoodness

HSM tomorrow and that looks like a possible contender


#8

[quote]Fuzzyapple wrote:
Finally something I can make at home to put on my chicken breasts! Thanks for the idea Chris. Will be making this for sure.

Does it taste hot/spicy along with being tangy? [/quote]

There’s a bit of heat at the “finish” from the cayenne, but just a nice little kick; I wouldn’t call it “hot.”

This dressing has an almost cult-like following, and that seems to be its appeal - a mix of savory and sweet with a little kick at the end.


#9

What is frustrating to me is that there aren’t any good commercial alternatives for stuff like this, at least that I know of. The last time I looked, I couldn’t find one dressing without soy bean oil. Even the italian dressing “made with olive oil” was the same old soy bean dressing with a splash of olive oil thrown in.

Chris, you ever think about marketing any of this? I would be game to buy some Shugarts Own salad dressing.


#10

As an Aussie I feel that Outback Steakhouse rapes my culture. Of course I have never actually seen one in Australia, they seem to be an American thing.

Also, best late night food ever is a 24 hour truck stop servo. They do big, decent feeds.


#11

[quote]Fezzik wrote:
What is frustrating to me is that there aren’t any good commercial alternatives for stuff like this, at least that I know of. The last time I looked, I couldn’t find one dressing without soy bean oil. Even the italian dressing “made with olive oil” was the same old soy bean dressing with a splash of olive oil thrown in.

Chris, you ever think about marketing any of this? I would be game to buy some Shugarts Own salad dressing.[/quote]

Ha! Not sure if my Biotest contract allows me to start a line of salad dressings on the side!

No, you’re absolutely right: you just can’t buy the really healthy stuff pre-made. Even the “organic” ones are full of organic sugar, organic less-than-good oils, etc. And with the rest of them, they just have to add a lot of chemicals because of mass production issues, shelf life concerns, etc. Then of course, to insure you re-buy, many add HFCS and transfat – the crack cocaine of the food world.

So this is one reason I learned to cook and make my own things like dressings: out of frustration with the store-bought stuff.


#12

[quote]Bunyip wrote:
As an Aussie I feel that Outback Steakhouse rapes my culture. Of course I have never actually seen one in Australia, they seem to be an American thing.
[/quote]

I always figured that Outback was an embarrassment to actual Australians. Don’t worry, we Texans feel the same way every time we see a “Texan” portrayed in a movie.


#13

And don’t forget that Texas Roadhouse was founded in Indiana.


#14

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Fezzik wrote:
What is frustrating to me is that there aren’t any good commercial alternatives for stuff like this, at least that I know of. The last time I looked, I couldn’t find one dressing without soy bean oil. Even the italian dressing “made with olive oil” was the same old soy bean dressing with a splash of olive oil thrown in.

Chris, you ever think about marketing any of this? I would be game to buy some Shugarts Own salad dressing.

Ha! Not sure if my Biotest contract allows me to start a line of salad dressings on the side!

No, you’re absolutely right: you just can’t buy the really healthy stuff pre-made. Even the “organic” ones are full of organic sugar, organic less-than-good oils, etc. And with the rest of them, they just have to add a lot of chemicals because of mass production issues, shelf life concerns, etc. Then of course, to insure you re-buy, many add HFCS and transfat – the crack cocaine of the food world.

So this is one reason I learned to cook and make my own things like dressings: out of frustration with the store-bought stuff.

[/quote]

Perhaps Biotest should consider going into food and condiments?

I have to say, Chris, that as a certified Kitchen Idiot with limited time, I really love reading about all your experiments and it’s-easy-you-can-do-its. One of these days I really am going to give one of your experiments a try. But keep writing this stuff because I need a resource and you’re it.


#15

This is awesome. I don’t think I’ve eaten a salad in the past few years that wasn’t tossed with olive oil/balsamic vinegar and nothing else.


#16

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Fezzik wrote:

Chris, you ever think about marketing any of this? I would be game to buy some Shugarts Own salad dressing.

Ha! Not sure if my Biotest contract allows me to start a line of salad dressings on the side!

[/quote]

As the resident business guy, make and market the dressings as part of Biotest, not on the side. if it makes money, I am sure uncle Dr Tim would be happy to pay a royalty (or not). its all about getting better and healthier, why wouldn’t Biotest want to bottle up some of this and sell it to us?

Remember, the vast majority of the guys on this site don’t cook (I do, and many of the guys that follow your work in the kitchen do, but I still think we are the minority). You should make up a drum of this stuff, have TC write one of his “hype this new Biotest thing” articles (not that its bad to hype your new stuff), and sell it as a Biotest product. If it doesn’t sell, you are only out the cost of a 55 gallon barrel worth of dressing. you don’t even have to bottle it until it gets ordered.

if this works, you owe me a lifetime supply of Alpha Male.


#17

OH, that’s a bottle of dressing in the picture? Thought you had a left a bong sitting on the table there. Made me wonder what type of special Outback you were going to!


#18

Chris,
any chance of you posting that recipe for the beer can chicken? Im always looking for new ways to cook chicken to keep it interesting.


#19

[quote]adrucker wrote:
Chris,
any chance of you posting that recipe for the beer can chicken? Im always looking for new ways to cook chicken to keep it interesting.[/quote]

Here ya go (second page):


#20

[quote]Bunyip wrote:
As an Aussie I feel that Outback Steakhouse rapes my culture. Of course I have never actually seen one in Australia, they seem to be an American thing.

I always figured that Outback was an embarrassment to actual Australians. Don’t worry, we Texans feel the same way every time we see a “Texan” portrayed in a movie.
[/quote]

Be glad you aint from South Carolina.