Biotest

Macadamia Nut Biscotti


#1

[center]The Almond Flour Cure [/center]
I knew it was true long before I wanted to admit it.

It wasn’t that it was hard to believe – it made absolute sense in fact – I just didn’t want to believe it because I wasn’t ready to change.

The truth that’s so hard to swallow? Most grains suck. And humans just weren’t meant to eat them.

I first read this in the 90’s in the book Protein Power. It was just a casual mention, a little chapter at the end of the book that basically explained how we’re not evolved to eat grains and grain products.

Now, like you, I’ve known for a while that white flour is bad news. So breads were first limited then avoided entirely. But I tried desperately to believe that whole-grain products were okay (long story short: they aren’t). Finally, I accepted the truth and tucked away all my now-worthless recipes that use whole-grain flours and bread-y ingredients.

Bye-bye panko. See ya later, whole-wheat tortillas.

Then I discovered a little miracle known as almond flour. Also called almond meal, this is simply finely ground almonds, either blanched (skins removed, white) or unblanched (skins on, dark).

Guess what I can eat now and still stay lean?

How about cookies?

Toss in pancakes, breads and muffins.

While there are some other good non-grain flours on the market (coconut and chia seed, for example) almond flour seems to be the most versatile and best tasting. And this stuff is great for post-<a href="http://velocity.tmuscle.com/free_online_program/sports_body_training_diet_velocity/velocity_diet_30#velocity-diet-3-0"target=“new”>V-Diet recipes. Let me give you an example.

Here’s my latest recipe utilizing almond flour: Macadamia Nut Biscotti.

[center]Macadamia Nut Biscotti[/center]

Biscotti are those crunchy, breadstick-looking cookies you see in Starbucks and fancy coffee houses. They’re twice-baked, meaning that they’re on the hard side and meant to be dipped in coffee or milky drinks.

For my version, I ditch the real flour, use omega-3 eggs, remove the sugar, and add even more crunch with healthy, almost-no-omega-6 macadamia nuts. Here’s what you’ll need:

The Stuff

3 cups almond meal (blanched is best here)
1 cup macadamia nuts
1 cup Splenda
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup water plus 2 tablespoons
1 teaspoon lemon zest or dried lemon peel (optional)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 eggs, omega-3 enriched

Putting It All Together

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

  2. Whisk together all the dry ingredients, including the nuts.

  3. In another bowl, whisk together all the wet ingredients.

  4. Combine wet and dry ingredients and stir until a dough forms.

  5. Make a giant dough ball, then break it into two halves. Form each half into an 8 inch roll and flatten them until each is about an inch thick.

  6. Place on baking/cookie pan lined with parchment paper. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove and let them cool for 10 minutes (a wire cooling rack helps here.) Now slice each loaf diagonally and place slices cut-side down on cookie sheet.

  1. Bake again for 12 to 15 minutes, then flip them over on the other side and bake a final 8 to 10 minutes. They’ll harden a bit more as they cool.

Enjoy with coffee, hot tea, or my favorite, a big glass of unsweetened vanilla almond milk.

Never thought I’d be able to enjoy foods like this again. Thanks, almond flour!

Give this a shot and post your variation ideas & pics below!


#2

By the way, you can get almond flour at most health food stores, but you’ll pay a lot for it. Better to go online and get it in bulk.

Here’s a pic of the 1 pound vs. the 5 pound bulk bag. Small bag is unblanched, big bag is blanched.

Next recipe: almond flour bread.


#3

Very cool. Here’s a link for almond meal pancakes as well.
http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/breakfast1/r/lowcarbpancakes.htm


#4

Weevo:

Yep, I’ve tried that too! Though I’ll have to try their sparkling water recommendation. Thanks!

Here’s the almond flour pancake I made my daughter earlier this week.


#5

when you make this recipe, do you have a total calorie count for the whole batch?

Figuring also that you could drop in some vanilla essence/pod, unsweetened cocoa etc to make some different versions.

Maybe orange peel and cocoa powder. drool


#6

[quote]indyhaan wrote:
when you make this recipe, do you have a total calorie count for the whole batch?

Figuring also that you could drop in some vanilla essence/pod, unsweetened cocoa etc to make some different versions.

Maybe orange peel and cocoa powder. drool[/quote]

I don’t count calories these days. Once you’re at your goal body comp (or right around there), then choosing only healthy, physique-supportive foods does the trick all by itself. Plus it just gets instinctive after a while.

Now, I am big on keeping a food log if you’re a beginner or on a specific diet, but for just all-around, healthy maintenance eating it’s not needed if only good foods are chose anyway. It’s just hard to overeat most healthy foods (except for nuts.)

Also, people tend to make so many adjustments with recipes that I don’t bother with calorie counts.

Orange peel and unsweetened cocoa would ROCK. No doubt.


#7

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Weevo:

Yep, I’ve tried that too! Though I’ll have to try their sparkling water recommendation. Thanks!

Here’s the almond flour pancake I made my daughter earlier this week. [/quote]

Sparkling Water in pancakes = win.

I was a cook at a grill once and we did breakfast and lunch. I had the coke guys hook up a water line to the CO2 and I made my pancakes with it. Good stuff :slight_smile:


#8

Agreed, I’m sure I could work it out if necessary but thought that I’d ask!

The calorie counting is to help out my fiancée, though with healthy versions of cookies, cakes etc. it is entirely possible to eat too many calories becuase the substitutions tend to be mostly fats (all be it healthy ones).

Personally I like self management and healthy food choices - its the only thing that makes sense long term.


#9

BTW, you do get some breakage as you’re cutting. Sadly, these errors must be immediately consumed by the chef before anyone else sees your shame.


#10

Can you guys receomend a website that sells the almond flour for a reasonable price?


#11

When you were talking about the “almost-no-omega 6 macadamia nuts”, I read just recently (like in the last month) that the American Dietetic Association is recommending omega 6 over omega 3 now for overall cardiovascular health. Curious if you have heard about this?


#12

The American Dietetic Association couldn’t find its ass with both hands. As a general rule I take whatever conventional wisdom says to do and then do the opposite.


#13

[quote]aBADsamaritan wrote:
Can you guys receomend a website that sells the almond flour for a reasonable price?[/quote]

Here’s where I got mine, on the recommendation of a woman who wrote an almond-flour cookbook. But there are a lot of places out there.

http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/blanchedalmondflour5lb.aspx

Edit: Not to self, clean the bottom of your mixture.


#14

[quote]TJ781 wrote:
When you were talking about the “almost-no-omega 6 macadamia nuts”, I read just recently (like in the last month) that the American Dietetic Association is recommending omega 6 over omega 3 now for overall cardiovascular health. Curious if you have heard about this?[/quote]

Haven’t looked into this yet, but Weevo has a pretty good general point.


#15

Thanks for another great recipe idea.

Also, good call on adding baking powder (Clabber Girl rocks!) to this coconut bread recipe:

1/2 teaspoon made it rise just enough to give it a softer texture. Thanks!


#16

The name of the article was:
The Debate about n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Recommendations for Cardiovascular Health
Penny Kris-Etherton, Jennifer Fleming, William S. Harris

It was an interesting read, i couldn’t find it for free on google otherwise i would have posted a link, I have a paper version of it. Gets into some of the science of why omega 3 was originally thought to be better than omega 6 and some possible errors in the reasoning. Either way its an interesting and provocative read to sift through.


#17

Can I make a pizza crust out of this? I don’t see why I couldn’t but I figured I ask if any one else has done it or at least tried it.


#18

[quote]RageInspired wrote:
Can I make a pizza crust out of this? I don’t see why I couldn’t but I figured I ask if any one else has done it or at least tried it.[/quote]

Holy crap, that might just work! Cut out the nuts, sweetener, zest, and vanilla and that might give you a crunchy pizza crust. Keep us posted!

May have to adjust the water too. Start with less than called for; see how the dough ball looks before adding more.


#19

A few have evolved to eat grains though, i have seen guys ripped put away two large bowls of coco pops.
… i am disapoint them.


#20

[quote]Kungfushish wrote:
A few have evolved to eat grains though, i have seen guys ripped put away two large bowls of coco pops.
… i am disapoint them.[/quote]

Me too, but that doesn’t mean it’s having positive effects on their bodies, or that they can get away with it for long. The negative effects accumulate. I’ve seen people without cancer and heart disease smoke too.