Biotest

Is Curcumin Anti-Androgenic?


#1

Just wondering if this is something to take into consideration. Mind you I have been taking 4 caps of Biotest Curcumin for some time now.

Curcumin derivatives inhibit testicular 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346654

Growth suppression of hamster flank organs by topical application of catechins, alizarin, curcumin, and myristoleic acid. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11380153

In laymen’s terms, curcumin may inhibit 17beta-HSD3 (the final step in testosterone synthesis) and 5-alpha reductase (an enzyme which converts testosterone into the more potent androgen DHT).


#2

[quote][quote][quote]PB Andy wrote:
Just wondering if this is something to take into consideration. Mind you I have been taking 4 caps of Biotest Curcumin for some time now.

Curcumin derivatives inhibit testicular 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346654

Growth suppression of hamster flank organs by topical application of catechins, alizarin, curcumin, and myristoleic acid. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11380153

In laymen’s terms, curcumin may inhibit 17beta-HSD3 (the final step in testosterone synthesis) and 5-alpha reductase (an enzyme which converts testosterone into the more potent androgen DHT).[/quote]

Also, high intakes of curcumin have been reported to inhibit the conversion of Testosterone to the more active androgen, DHT, but the likelihood of this being true in humans is low given that the research involved extremely high doses.

Regardless, the jury is still out on the exact effect of curcumin on Testosterone in humans.[/quote]

http://examine.com/supplements/Curcumin/#summary11

Curcumin, at 100mg/kg bodyweight in rats, has been shown to preserve testosterone levels when coadministered with a drug (Metronidazole) that causes testosterone reductions and worsens parameters of sperm.[153]

Protective effects on the testes have also been noted with curcumin in regards to alcohol, where curcumin (80mg/kg bodyweight) was able to preserve testicle structure and testosterone levels despite alcohol consumption,[154] most likely though preventing the oxidation of ethanol to acetylaldehyde.[155] Other compounds that damage the testicles and reduce testosterone, but are protected against by curcumin, include excessive chromium levels[156] and cadmium.[157]

When looking at the 17beta-HSD3, the final step in testicular testosterone synthesis, curcumin was found to be a noncompetitive inhibitor with an IC50 of 2.3uM, and brought Luteinizing-Hormone stimulated testosterone levels down to 34% of control at a concentration of 10uM.[37] This effect was not dose-dependent, and concentrations of 1uM were not significantly different from 0.1uM and control cells.[37]

Curcumin may also possess inhibitory actions against 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that converts testosterone into the more potent androgen DHT. The IC50 value is reportedly between 5-10uM.[38]

Given the above two mechanisms (17beta-HSD3 and 5AR inhibition) are anti-androgenic in nature, it would be prudent to observe in vivo effects of curcumin. The only current study on the matter used injections of PEG-curcumin at 0.5mg (giving a Cmax of 7ug/mL to then decline to 1ug/mL) noted a decrease in circulating testosterone levels and function of seminal vesicles, although testicle weight did not decline.[158]

Curcumin appears to have protective effects on testicular functions, but possesses anti-androgenic activity. The concentration required for inhibition is high, but it appears to occur in vivo when it is met; it is uncertain what oral dose is needed for these effects, but it might occur with superloading and increasing bioavailability. Low doses of curcumin may have no adverse effect whatsoever
[/quote]

Needs more science.


#3

[quote]corstijeir wrote:

[quote][quote][quote]PB Andy wrote:
Just wondering if this is something to take into consideration. Mind you I have been taking 4 caps of Biotest Curcumin for some time now.

Curcumin derivatives inhibit testicular 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346654

Growth suppression of hamster flank organs by topical application of catechins, alizarin, curcumin, and myristoleic acid. - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11380153

In laymen’s terms, curcumin may inhibit 17beta-HSD3 (the final step in testosterone synthesis) and 5-alpha reductase (an enzyme which converts testosterone into the more potent androgen DHT).[/quote]

Also, high intakes of curcumin have been reported to inhibit the conversion of Testosterone to the more active androgen, DHT, but the likelihood of this being true in humans is low given that the research involved extremely high doses.

Regardless, the jury is still out on the exact effect of curcumin on Testosterone in humans.[/quote]

http://examine.com/supplements/Curcumin/#summary11

Curcumin, at 100mg/kg bodyweight in rats, has been shown to preserve testosterone levels when coadministered with a drug (Metronidazole) that causes testosterone reductions and worsens parameters of sperm.[153]

Protective effects on the testes have also been noted with curcumin in regards to alcohol, where curcumin (80mg/kg bodyweight) was able to preserve testicle structure and testosterone levels despite alcohol consumption,[154] most likely though preventing the oxidation of ethanol to acetylaldehyde.[155] Other compounds that damage the testicles and reduce testosterone, but are protected against by curcumin, include excessive chromium levels[156] and cadmium.[157]

When looking at the 17beta-HSD3, the final step in testicular testosterone synthesis, curcumin was found to be a noncompetitive inhibitor with an IC50 of 2.3uM, and brought Luteinizing-Hormone stimulated testosterone levels down to 34% of control at a concentration of 10uM.[37] This effect was not dose-dependent, and concentrations of 1uM were not significantly different from 0.1uM and control cells.[37]

Curcumin may also possess inhibitory actions against 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that converts testosterone into the more potent androgen DHT. The IC50 value is reportedly between 5-10uM.[38]

Given the above two mechanisms (17beta-HSD3 and 5AR inhibition) are anti-androgenic in nature, it would be prudent to observe in vivo effects of curcumin. The only current study on the matter used injections of PEG-curcumin at 0.5mg (giving a Cmax of 7ug/mL to then decline to 1ug/mL) noted a decrease in circulating testosterone levels and function of seminal vesicles, although testicle weight did not decline.[158]

Curcumin appears to have protective effects on testicular functions, but possesses anti-androgenic activity. The concentration required for inhibition is high, but it appears to occur in vivo when it is met; it is uncertain what oral dose is needed for these effects, but it might occur with superloading and increasing bioavailability. Low doses of curcumin may have no adverse effect whatsoever
[/quote]

Needs more science.[/quote]
for sure. here is one more study I found.

Reproductive effects of a pegylated curcumin.

“Estrogenic/antiandrogenic and pregnancy-disrupting effects of a water soluble/bioavailable curcumin were demonstrated.”

It is just something I’ve been wondering about since the Curcumin product page says ‘increases test levels in men’, but the only studies that show curcumin has a modulatory effect on testosterone from the excerpt you posted is the one where it preserved testosterone levels when coadministered with metronidazole in rats, and the one where it has a protective effect on testosterone in regards to alcohol consumption in Leydig cells of mice.


#4

The first study actually shows that curcumin increases T (if you look at the graph) up to a certain concentration. In the second study, the scientists suggest curcumin acts on sites other than 5 alpha reductase and do not exhibit systemic (whole body) effects (only when applied directly). They do, however, clearly say curcumin is a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor. The last study uses pegylated curcumin which is very bioactice compared to normal curcumin. I contacted a scientist who did research on non-pegylated curcumin and he told me curcmin increases testosterone by inhibitin oxidation of leydig cells in a dose dependent manner (meaning too high a dose will cause a decrease in testosterone, too low won’t have an effect). I’ve looked at a few other studies and they seem to show the same effects. I have seen that curcumin is a 5 alpha reductase type 2 inhibitor but I wouldn’t classify it as an antiandrogen.