Biotest

Interesting: Bulimia/Food Disorders and Wheat


#1

Greetings Chris,
not sure where else I can post this but thought your interest would be piqued with these posts on food disorders and wheat. Note people’s experiences:

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2011/11/bulimia-cured/comment-page-1/#comments

cheers.


#2

Interesting, thanks!

The psychological effects of wheat are very interesting. People often make the mistake of assuming you have to be a celiac to experience the negative effects of wheat. Not so.


#3

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Interesting, thanks!

The psychological effects of wheat are very interesting. People often make the mistake of assuming you have to be a celiac to experience the negative effects of wheat. Not so.

[/quote]

Oh hell no. I am not celiac but I can definitely “tell” when I have eaten gluten, even when someone sneaks into something I eat and either doesn’t know or they just don’t tell me.


#4

Just to continue this, given what I’ve read in WheatBelly about the nature of wheat now - essentially it’s goatgrass, with the gliadin protein in it acting as an opiate ie appetite stimulant, and - given what you’ve written about saturated fat, supported again by WB book - the USDA, Michelle Obama and the entire US public school system should ready themselves for wholesale lawsuits based on nutritionally poisoning their students.

http://www.fns.usda.gov/cga/PressReleases/2012/0023.htm

As you and Icarus said, Chris, the effects of wheat are not just felt by celiac sufferers.

Incidentally, the rise in depression is caused by wheat.

Can’t recall if you read the book but please do.
Chris, you should know that one reason I was so ready to hear and understand WB’s content was because of the preparatory reading I’ve done here on Tnation, quite a bit of it on your blog/forum.

I’ve gone off wheat and my own health is slowly mending. I cannot recommend the book enough, partly because it is engagingly but straightforwardly written, with so much supplementary material on the blog.
A useful pairing is Tom Naughton’s documentary Fathead, which I think I also first heard about on Tnation.

Geez, guys, if I hadn’t come to Tnation i’d probably be a cripple. ;)And to think the only way I got here was because of a weird link on Google to a really weird discussion on Tnation which had nothing to do with nutrition, bodybuilding or muscle!

That’s my way of saying thank you, cos i know you hate these girly emotional lavender cakes and tear-filled wildflower bouquets.:wink:


#5

Very cool, nuffsaid!

Did you catch this?

http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/oreilly/index.html#/v/1752265303001/factor-tip-dont-eat-wheat/?playlist_id=1740294866001


#6

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
Incidentally, the rise in depression is caused by wheat.[/quote]

That’s a bit of a bold statement; exacerbate it yes (in my case), but I’m skeptical as to actually causing it.

I suffered depression (and probably always will to an extent), but have definitely noticed a significant reduction in mood swings since eliminating wheat. I know now from experience / trial-and-error that if I eat a standard serving of anything wheat-based, exactly 2 days afterwards I will hit a ‘dark day’. This is also the same for beer but not wine or vodka, so I don’t think it’s gluten related. Either way I can’t drink where I am so now so that’s a moot point :slight_smile:


#7

The book Wheat Belly does get into the wheat/depression/mood link I think. Very interesting stuff.


#8

[quote]Grumpig Hunt wrote:

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
Incidentally, the rise in depression is caused by wheat.[/quote]

That’s a bit of a bold statement; exacerbate it yes (in my case), but I’m skeptical as to actually causing it.

I suffered depression (and probably always will to an extent), but have definitely noticed a significant reduction in mood swings since eliminating wheat. I know now from experience / trial-and-error that if I eat a standard serving of anything wheat-based, exactly 2 days afterwards I will hit a ‘dark day’. This is also the same for beer but not wine or vodka, so I don’t think it’s gluten related. Either way I can’t drink where I am so now so that’s a moot point :)[/quote]

I made that statement based on my reading of the book and thinking about the large distribtuion of same among Americans and Australians, the two countries with which I am most familiar regarding this type of high yield, semi dwarf wheat. And in both these countries, depression has risen considerably. I suppose too I am thinking mainly of young people.

Feel free to agree or disagree but be advised I will only take seriously assent or dissent regarding this statement based on whether you’ve read the book or not and therefore understand the context.

Wheat is not the sole cause of depression in this world. But the RISE in depression I am pretty confident is wheat-caused.

I am a little sensitive on this subject too, because i have been (verbally) attacked and insulted - “diet-obsessed women looking for magical cures” - by someone who has NOT read the book, has no clue what i mean when I spoke of Wheat Belly and reckons all you need is a “balanced” diet, excercise, lots of sleep etc etc. he also thought I was telling him to go on it, when I was not.
Which is all great if you actually have the respiratory capability to do all those things (apart from sleep!), and having read so much on Tnation, the last nutritionally sound thing anyone would talk about is this notion of the “balanced diet”.

At any rate, it is an excellent book and fits right into much of the nutrition talk here.
It will be interesting to see what happens once the wheat awareness really grows.
According to a couple of reviewers who didn’t like the book, there might be a couple of alleged scientific irregularities in Dr D’s quotes of certain studies. So, he can fix them if so.

Too many people have now been helped by this book to ignore it - the testimonies - generally involving blood test results!! - are compelling and in some cases, truly astounding, in terms of potential operations avoided by simply giving up this one element ingested daily.

Frankly, I’m astounded too - a walk in the supermarket and reading the ingredients as usual on not just the stuff i ususuall buy, but extra jars of soup, canned things, sauces, that I picked up to read, sweets, crackers…: not just one part sugar, but three, four types of sugar listings! Cornstarch, listed also as corn, HFCS, -ose this and -ase that. Amazing.

Since (Dr Davis says) much of the wheat distortion was achieved in the name of getting a higher yield, presumably to fulfil food demand around the world, what will happen once people switch to flax seed meal, almond meal, coconut flour etc??
Will these in turn be hybridised/distorted to get a higher yield, thus making them unfit for most humans’ consumption?
That’s the issue I find important.


#9

Grumpig Hunt: “if I eat a standard serving of anything wheat-based, exactly 2 days afterwards I will hit a ‘dark day’. This is also the same for beer but not wine or vodka, so I don’t think it’s gluten related”

That’s interesting. I too definitely have my mood aletered but don’t know the time lag. Haven’t gone into that kind of detail. The bloating is kind of depressing though!! :wink:

Beer comes from grains, but wine is from grapes and vodka from potatoes. I don’t think the latter two have gluten, do they? I’d assume they raise your blood sugar though, no?


#10

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
The book Wheat Belly does get into the wheat/depression/mood link I think. Very interesting stuff. [/quote]

Dr D writes a lot about the neurological effects of wheat. In the book but a lot on his blog too.
Check out the links on the left hand side of the page: www.wheatbellyblog.com


#11

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Very cool, nuffsaid!

Did you catch this?

http://www.foxnews.com/on-air/oreilly/index.html#/v/1752265303001/factor-tip-dont-eat-wheat/?playlist_id=1740294866001[/quote]

Yep! The Bill O’Reilly clip made it to the WB blog!! Very interesting!
I think the best thing about trying this out is that you can feel an effect of some sort within the first day or two of going without wheat. Not many things yield results that fast!!


#12

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
I made that statement based on my reading of the book and thinking about the large distribtuion of same among Americans and Australians, the two countries with which I am most familiar regarding this type of high yield, semi dwarf wheat. And in both these countries, depression has risen considerably. I suppose too I am thinking mainly of young people.

Feel free to agree or disagree but be advised I will only take seriously assent or dissent regarding this statement based on whether you’ve read the book or not and therefore understand the context.

Wheat is not the sole cause of depression in this world. But the RISE in depression I am pretty confident is wheat-caused.
[/quote]

Calm down, tiger :wink: I’m currently only about halfway through the book. Again, I don’t think the rise in depression can solely be attributed to wheat (though I agree it’s likely to be a contributing factor), my point being: don’t forget there have been massive increases in stress at all society’s levels in the last 50+ years, more-so in developed countries - people these days are working more hours in stressful situations to earn money to pay off their huge debts.

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
Beer comes from grains, but wine is from grapes and vodka from potatoes. I don’t think the latter two have gluten, do they? I’d assume they raise your blood sugar though, no?[/quote]

I’m not following a gluten-free diet at the moment, eliminating wheat was the first experimental step I have taken to those ends. My point here was that beer (barley-based ones without all the additives) contain gluten traces of hordein rather than the gliadin found in wheat - so I’m not sure if it’s the wheat gluten that effects me. Of course to really test this, I would have to eliminate gluten too. All in due time, but I do enjoy my morning oatmeal :slight_smile:


#13

[quote]Grumpig Hunt wrote:

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
I made that statement based on my reading of the book and thinking about the large distribtuion of same among Americans and Australians, the two countries with which I am most familiar regarding this type of high yield, semi dwarf wheat. And in both these countries, depression has risen considerably. I suppose too I am thinking mainly of young people.

Feel free to agree or disagree but be advised I will only take seriously assent or dissent regarding this statement based on whether you’ve read the book or not and therefore understand the context.

Wheat is not the sole cause of depression in this world. But the RISE in depression I am pretty confident is wheat-caused.
[/quote]

Calm down, tiger :wink: I’m currently only about halfway through the book. Again, I don’t think the rise in depression can solely be attributed to wheat (though I agree it’s likely to be a contributing factor), my point being: don’t forget there have been massive increases in stress at all society’s levels in the last 50+ years, more-so in developed countries - people these days are working more hours in stressful situations to earn money to pay off their huge debts.

[quote]'nuffsaid wrote:
Beer comes from grains, but wine is from grapes and vodka from potatoes. I don’t think the latter two have gluten, do they? I’d assume they raise your blood sugar though, no?[/quote]

I’m not following a gluten-free diet at the moment, eliminating wheat was the first experimental step I have taken to those ends. My point here was that beer (barley-based ones without all the additives) contain gluten traces of hordein rather than the gliadin found in wheat - so I’m not sure if it’s the wheat gluten that effects me. Of course to really test this, I would have to eliminate gluten too. All in due time, but I do enjoy my morning oatmeal :slight_smile:
[/quote]

RRRRRRoar!! Should I expect to be called 'champ" next time? :wink:

Now I did not say the sole cause of depression is wheat - how could it be?
So I think we’re sort of agreeing with each other. Neverhtheless it is significant (not in the statistical sense) that there is so much depression about.

As to your beer gluten matter, i wouldn’t have aclue about that. Dr Davis does make the point -a t length, in both his book and his blog - that grains in general are not terrific for humans to ingest.
he’s not the only one - one of his blog readers cited a Dr Jay Wortman who makes the same point.
Other doctors do too, but if you Google Dr Jay Wortman and read his blog (which is on my list)
he may discuss it to your satisfaction.
Just another source, though i haven’t read his stuff yet.

Much of what Dr Davis centres on the point that these various substances wihtin grains make your blood sugar rise to alarming levels (my word, not his), whereas the wheat protein gliadin acts as an appetitie stimulant and inlammation cause, affecting people ona n immunological level.
I think he goes more into that in one of his interviews. It may be on the blog too but I haven’t got to that yet if so.

have a look there www.wheatbellyblog.com

cheers