Biotest

Indigo-3G Dosing


#1

I would like to try Indigo-3G. However, while I don’t question the benefits of I3G, I have to admit that $64.95 for 15 servings is a bit too expensive considering my budget. Now, I was wondering if less that one serving per day would still yield a benefit? For example, 3 capsules per day rather than 6 would obviously yield 30 servings (so about a month) which would be within my reach. Also, I saw another product online in which one serving contains a mere 30 mg C3G compared to the 600 mg in I3G. Thus, while I’m sure I3G is superior, it just made me wonder if less than 600 mg per day would do as well if on a budget?

Thanks,
Soren


Indigo-3G - 4 or 6 Capsules?
Dosing 'Options'
Dosage of Cyanidin 3-Glucoside
#2

30 mg dosing will not have been chosen for efficacy.

There are many, many instances in nutritional supplementation where products list ingredients at doses even 100 or 1000 times lower than what’s known to work, apparently for the purpose of making the casual buyer think he’s getting one or more great things while not having to spend the money to actually provide them in any meaningful way. “Label value” only.

There appears partial benefit to Indigo-3G at lower dosing but the product’s purpose is to be a game-changer and that isn’t accomplished at dosings that are reduced much below recommendation, or at least isn’t a reliable outcome.

Some health benefit long term at say 1 capsule per day? Most probably, but not in line with what people are finding with the product when dosed as recommendation.

By no means are we overestimating what should be used for best effect.


#3

Hi Bill,

Thank you for your reply. I didn’t mean to suggest that you (Biotest?) are overestimating the necessary amount. I’m sorry if it came across that way. I was just wondering to what extend the benefits exist at say half the recommended dosage. However, as I understand, you would always recommend the full dosage.


#4

Oh no, no need to apologize whatsoever and I didn’t think you were sounding that way. I was only trying to be complete.

Yes, I’d always recommend at least the 4 capsule minimum of the label range.

It’s a good question as to what the benefit would be at 2 capsules; all I can say for sure is we immediately found it clearly much better to go past this, having started at about that level in initial work.


#5

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Oh no, no need to apologize whatsoever and I didn’t think you were sounding that way. I was only trying to be complete.

Yes, I’d always recommend at least the 4 capsule minimum of the label range.

It’s a good question as to what the benefit would be at 2 capsules; all I can say for sure is we immediately found it clearly much better to go past this, having started at about that level in initial work.[/quote]

just curious but…how do you reconcile the static suggested dosage with the wide variance in the body weight of individual users?

For example, how is a 6 cap dosage ok for both a 150 lb user yet still enough for a 225lb user?


#6

I also myself from time to time think on that point; there could be something to such adjustments at least in theory.

However in practice, for example few pharmaceuticals are medically dosed according to weight or LBM of the individual: there’s simply a dose for human beings. It works. (There are some drugs which are, but most are not.)

Another example would be performance enhancing drugs such as anabolic steroids. In practice, dosing is not according to weight. It’s certainly according to gender and to past experience, but weight adjustment is rarely or ever done, and results are consistent across weight categories. It doesn’t seem important to dosing.

Why is this? Well, to some extent it may be from rates of metabolism and elimination of drugs or nutraceuticals not generally being a function of bodyweight. Another aspect is that even in cases where it’s shown that adjustment should be made for size, it’s not in direct proportion to weight, but instead generally in proportion to surface area of the organism, which is a smaller adjustment.

I’d expect that adjustment could well be applied to extreme differences: for example a 90 lb woman really is considerably smaller than what we have extensive experience base for, and some reduction (not proportional though!) in dose could make sense.

But range such as male lifters in general, there does not seem any need for bodyweight adjustment, or at least not upwards. There has not been any need for dosing in excess of 6 capsules, and this has included some very large individuals.


#7

hmmm, good points (with respect to other meds or supps that don’t scale to bodyweight).

As always, appreciate your response.


#8

You’re very welcome!