Biotest

How to Salt your Meat!


#1

Take this with a grain of salt if you want, but I think you will be surprised with the results.

When cooking meat I have found it best ( as well as others ) then you should salt 1 of 2 ways. Though there is a 3rd I will touch on that I don’t use for the main salting, just a final touch.

  1. Salt your meat at least 40 in advance of cooking( if not the day/night before ).
    There is a scientific reasoning behind it, basically any later than 3 minutes prior to cooking up until the 40 minute marker is a waste, the salt has liquified but not really been absorbed.

  2. Salt your meat immediately before cooking ( up to 3 minutes before ).
    The salt does not penetrate the meat, but it creates a good crust on the outside, that is super tasty.

  3. Salt after the meat is done cooking.
    Some chefs swear it’s the only way.

If it’s something I’m cooking in a pan to get a good sear for the maillard reaction then I use a combination of all 3. Salt an hour before, right before, then finish at the end. First 2 salts are kosher, 3rd salting is a finisher of sea salt. Gives you a solidly seasoned meat, a good crust, and some flavor explosions ( note the sea salt finisher should be a finisher, just a tiny amount goes a long way on this )

If you’re grilling it or broiling it go with 1 and 3 or just number 2. no need to do all 3 for grilling or broiling as you wont get the maillard reaction ( unless you got an industrial broiler ).

Works for pork, beef, poultry, lamb, wild game.

NOTE: I don’t know if this works on fish. If I cook fish it’s usually a good quality tuna steak that I just sear on both sides and then eat it. Now and then I do oven baked talapia but I do salt-less seasoning then salt at the end


#2

Good stuff.

Watching a pro chef cook, I’m always amazing at how much salt they use. Properly salted food doesn’t necessarily taste salty though; the salt mere pulls out the natural flavor from the food. Nice.


#3

When I grill steak I like to roll it in kosher salt,immediately grill it, and then brush much of the salt off after it is done. Very tasty! My favorite is Tri-tip steak, but it works for any cut of meat. The key is to brush most of it off after grilling, otherwise it can be too salty.


#4

[quote]hockeydawg wrote:
When I grill steak I like to roll it in kosher salt,immediately grill it, and then brush much of the salt off after it is done. Very tasty! My favorite is Tri-tip steak, but it works for any cut of meat. The key is to brush most of it off after grilling, otherwise it can be too salty. [/quote]

I’ve done that once or twice before. Though I’ve really come to find the steps above to be flawless every time.


#5

Use realsalt: realsalt.com

It’s the best ever.


#6

Why even use salt? As someone who RARELY adds salt to anything, I have found so many other seasonings to add to meat. A variety of peppers for one. Any bit of salt and to me it tastes too salty. While I still eat quite a bit of processed foods, I get my intake of sodium. But for me, the best thing to add to a steak is mushrooms and onions.


#7

[quote]limburg wrote:
Why even use salt? As someone who RARELY adds salt to anything, I have found so many other seasonings to add to meat. A variety of peppers for one. Any bit of salt and to me it tastes too salty. While I still eat quite a bit of processed foods, I get my intake of sodium. But for me, the best thing to add to a steak is mushrooms and onions.[/quote]

Proper use of salt isn’t about making food salty. It’s about bringing out the natural flavors of the food itself. Salt does this.