Biotest

Flourless Pizza. Finally


#81

I’ve made this a couple times now and I think my pizza craving is totally satisfied.

Have done turkey pepperoni, canadian bacon, and peppers as well as chicken (thanks for the idea using the pre-roasted chickens), spinach, and bacon.

Used a stone the second time and I think it made the crust a little better.


#82

[quote]Barge wrote:
I’ve made this a couple times now and I think my pizza craving is totally satisfied.

Have done turkey pepperoni, canadian bacon, and peppers as well as chicken (thanks for the idea using the pre-roasted chickens), spinach, and bacon.

Used a stone the second time and I think it made the crust a little better.[/quote]

Very cool.

Working on a crunchy almond flour crust now. Not bad so far!


#83

The big picture.


#84

Chris you said that for crust

“Finally I started making mini-pizzas using low-carb, high-fiber tortillas as crusts. These were pretty good, but you knew you weren’t eating real pizza, and those low-carb tortillas still contained a lot of questionable ingredients.”

do you recommend not using those high fiber tortillas when on a low-carb diet. i personally have been using them as a good source of fiber and pretty good taste for that low net-carbs, but if they are not worth it please let me know. thanks


#85

[quote]zbelair wrote:
Chris you said that for crust

“Finally I started making mini-pizzas using low-carb, high-fiber tortillas as crusts. These were pretty good, but you knew you weren’t eating real pizza, and those low-carb tortillas still contained a lot of questionable ingredients.”

do you recommend not using those high fiber tortillas when on a low-carb diet. i personally have been using them as a good source of fiber and pretty good taste for that low net-carbs, but if they are not worth it please let me know. thanks[/quote]

I used them for a long time. They’re okay macro-wise, though if you read the ingredient list you’ll see some questionable stuff in there. I think they’re a good stepping stone away from regular bread, but ideally I’d suggest moving beyond them.

Think of it as fine-tuning. You can do good on them, but you can also do better.


#86

For lack of a better place to put this . . .

I took the basic mashed cauliflower recipe and mixed in 3 heads of roasted garlic, added 1-1/2 cups of unsweetened almond milk, a couple of tablespoons of pasture butter, a bag of frozen peas, and three cans of tuna and salt to taste. Voila! Cream tuna!

Served over a bed of veggies. It turned out a little thick, so next time I may use a little more almond milk.

I see possibilities for using this cauliflower recipe in healthing-up any recipe that calls for a cream-based sauce.


#87

That sounds interesting. I may have to try it in my attempts to make a healthy broccoli cheese casserole!


#88

Let us know how it turns out!

(P.S. - I guess I should clarify: I blended in the garlic but simply heated the peas and the tuna.)


#89

Not sure if it’s been mentioned but a great way to get your crust crunch is to cook it on a pizza pan for 2/3rds of the cook time, after that, take it out and put the crust straight on the oven racks. Crisps it up nice and right (how I do it with my fat mans pizza I allow myself once a month).


#90

Chris,

Which crust do you prefer more? the cauliflower or the almond flour? From a carb/calories/taste breakdown.


#91

[quote]tomkade wrote:
Chris,

Which crust do you prefer more? the cauliflower or the almond flour? From a carb/calories/taste breakdown.[/quote]

I haven’t broken down the macros actually.

Both are great though.


#92

chris any chance of getting the almond flour crust recipe?


#93

[quote]nateschmidt24 wrote:
chris any chance of getting the almond flour crust recipe?[/quote]

Here’s the gist of it. Go look up the biscotti recipe here in the blog. Wait, I’ll do it…

http://velocity.tmuscle.com/free_online_forum/diet_blog_hammer_velocity_shugart/the_almond_flour_cure

Now, take out the sweetener, nuts, zest and vanilla. Replace with oregano, garlic, etc. That’s pretty much it.

I do prefer the cauliflower crust though.


#94

[quote]Xab wrote:
I was going to suggest a bit of almond flour to firm it up a bit. It’s closer to regular, non-food flour so it should also help keep the pie from sticking to the pan. [/quote]

What about adding a fiber supplement to it, like Metamucil or something along those lines. As long as they aren’t flavored they won’t affect the taste, and the fiber will absorb the moisture. I use it in protein pancakes all the time. Just takes about 1-3 T / batch.

v/r

Gremlin


#95

Just made a crust out of 1 cup almond flour, 1/2 cup milled flax, 1/2 cup parm cheese, 1 tsp baking powder, salt, garlic, and cilantro. Topped with pesto, tomato sauce, mozzarella, and turkey pepperoni. Turned out very well.


#96

Best version I’ve put together:
Preheat oven to 400
Fresh cauliflower, rice it, measure out 1 cup unpacked, microwave for 2 minutes in a wire basket in a bowl (dries out the cauliflower a bit and the wire basket lets water drain down).
Cheese, shredded, 1 cup unpacked
Egg, 1
Almond meal, 1/2 to 1 cup unpacked
Spices (Oregano, Basil, Garlic Powder)

Mix it all up and spread it on a perforated pizza pan. The perforated pan ends up being key since all previous versions always ended up with soggy middle issues, and the pan fixed it.

Bake 15 minutes. Remove, apply toppings, bake another 15. Let cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Chop up, pick up, and enjoy your low-carb pizza.

Dessert variant: Use 1 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes instead of almond meal, throw in some splenda instead of the other spices, and top with pineapple when done baking.


#97

I’ve made this pizza twice now and have a couple tricks that worked out really well for me:

I use fresh cauliflower, break apart 1 head and put it in the food processor raw.
Throw it all in a baking dish and roast until cooked (take out and stir a couple times, took me about 20 min to cook).

Follow the original recipe except use 1 whole egg & 2 egg whites, 1 cup almond flour & 2 packets of splenda (my original crust tasted slightly bitter and this really helped but did not make the crust taste sweet), use same amounts of all other ingredients

  • I riced the cauliflower to remove extra moisture the 1st time but forgot the 2nd time–it didn’t make a difference probably b/c of the almond flour helping to hold it together
    I followed the original cooking temp, etc.

This version tasted perfect to my husband and I and it held together really well.


#98

This has become one of my favorite recipes. Here’s last night’s version, made with frozen and boiled cauliflower, some standard “lightened” pizza toppings and (wait for it…) grilled asparagus! Rocked.


#99

I just can’t seem to get the cauliflower crust sturdy enough. Almond flour crust, on the other hand, works great.


#100

[quote]Weevo wrote:
I just can’t seem to get the cauliflower crust sturdy enough. Almond flour crust, on the other hand, works great.[/quote]

I don’t bother trying to slice it. I just eat it with a fork.

I’ll be experimenting with a new almond flour crust pizza soon though.