Biotest

Flourless Pizza. Finally


#21

As I just ate cauliflower for the first time in my life last week, I’m am certainly going to try this. Off the top of my head (the perforated pan looks like it will work great btw) possibly changing the ratio of parmesan to mozzarella? The parmesan is more dry and may soak up some moisture (or turn the mixture to an unformable mess). Or maybe putting the cauliflower in a dehydrator for a while?

Cook it in the morning, place in dehydrator and make it for dinner. And lastly, I’m not sure how pliable the “dough” is, but maybe making pizza pockets might be a great idea for it (so it can be handheld all at once). I’ll try out some variation this weekend.


#22

[quote]HogLover wrote:
I actually looked this up and made it a week or so ago when you hinted at it in one of your LiveSpills. It was funny because I decided to make it for myself at my brothers birthday party. My parents had ordered 4 or 5 regular pizzas (which are like crack to me), but I decided I wasn’t going to deviate from my streak of good eating. So I decided to make this cauliflower crusted pizza.

Like I said, everyone was making comments and giving me a hard time while I was fixing it up but I had the last laugh once the pie was done. Everyone was so intrigued with how good and gourmet it looked when I was finished. Everyone of course wanted to try a bite and they were all pleasantly surprised. My wife who humors me by cooking healthy at home usually turns her nose up at these “Shugart Experiments” that I make at home but even she was blown away by this pizza. Man, especially for those of us who have quite the addiction to pizza… this is a glorious discovery for sure.

Here’s a picture of how mine turned out. Looking forward to the next one. I’ll add some meat to the next one.

The only thing I did different than what you suggested here was that I added some fennel, and basil or parsley to the crust mix prior to baking the crust. [/quote]

That looks awesome! They really do have that high-end rustic look to them you’d get at a brick oven pizza joint.


#23

[quote]TYR wrote:
As I just ate cauliflower for the first time in my life last week, I’m am certainly going to try this. Off the top of my head (the perforated pan looks like it will work great btw) possibly changing the ratio of parmesan to mozzarella? The parmesan is more dry and may soak up some moisture (or turn the mixture to an unformable mess). Or maybe putting the cauliflower in a dehydrator for a while?

Cook it in the morning, place in dehydrator and make it for dinner. And lastly, I’m not sure how pliable the “dough” is, but maybe making pizza pockets might be a great idea for it (so it can be handheld all at once). I’ll try out some variation this weekend.[/quote]

Good ideas. More parm should help.

It’s not very “doughy” though. Doesn’t really stretch. But man, pizza pockets would be great.

Right now you could cook it first, then possibly roll it up for a quasi-cannoli effect. Hmm…


#24

Pizza pockets, holy shit balls— great Idea TYR.


#25

Tried again but I doubled up on the eggs and made a few smaller pizzas (and some breadsticks), turned out perfect. About a tablespoon of lighthouse light ranch on each, a couple of strips of turkey bacon, and a little bit of cheese to hold it all in place. The crust held together a lot better with 2 eggs, although the dough was messy to work with, but the first pizza was so good I had the second on my plate before I finished the first.


#26

[quote]steelechris wrote:
Tried again but I doubled up on the eggs and made a few smaller pizzas (and some breadsticks), turned out perfect. About a tablespoon of lighthouse light ranch on each, a couple of strips of turkey bacon, and a little bit of cheese to hold it all in place. The crust held together a lot better with 2 eggs, although the dough was messy to work with, but the first pizza was so good I had the second on my plate before I finished the first.[/quote]

Maybe 1 whole egg, 1 egg white? Might make it less messy.


#27

Amazing.

Will try ASAP.


#28

More good suggestions here. I’ll be trying this out later this week. I think I’ll go with the grated, not-steamed ideas first.


#29

I actually found a recipe for a flax crust which contained no grains at all and was perfectly inline with your health guidelines. The only issue, of course, is the density of flax, which makes the crust a ton of calories. Furthermore, I found plenty of low-carb crusts. I’ll post the ingredients with the link:

Egg-based crust
Ingredients:

* 6 eggs
* 6 oz cream cheese (3/4 package) at room temperature
* 1 teaspoon garlic powder
* 1�½ teaspoon oregano or other Italian seasoning
* �½ teaspoon salt
* pinches of black and/or cayenne pepper
* 1 cup (or a little more) shredded Italian cheeses, at least half of which is a hard cheese (Parmesan, Assagio)

Flax Meal Crust
Ingredients:

* 1 and 1/2 C flax seed meal
* 2 teaspoons baking powder
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 teaspoon oregano
* Sweetener to equal about 1 Tablespoon of sugar
* 3 Tablespoons of oil
* 3 eggs
* 1/2 C water

Here are the rest:


#30

Very cool, Perpalicious. Thanks!

I like the cauliflower crust idea because it adds vegetable and volumizes, but those look good too. Maybe a blend of them both would be ideal.


#31

I think there should be a way to mix the flax and the cauliflower together because there are breads that combine spinach and bread. I guess I’ll have to experiment. I’ll head out to the grocery store and see what I can come up with.

I have to ask: How do we know if there has been no added sugar to the tomato sauce/paste? If the ingredients say no sugar but the sugar is high is that simply due to the concentration of tomatoes?


#32

If it’s in the ingredients list then it is added, if it’s on the nutrition info but not in the ingredients then it is naturally occuring.

Generally.


#33

[quote]Perpalicious wrote:
I think there should be a way to mix the flax and the cauliflower together because there are breads that combine spinach and bread. I guess I’ll have to experiment. I’ll head out to the grocery store and see what I can come up with.

I have to ask: How do we know if there has been no added sugar to the tomato sauce/paste? If the ingredients say no sugar but the sugar is high is that simply due to the concentration of tomatoes? [/quote]

Yes, corstijeir nailed it.

The tomatoes have some natural sugars, which are no big worry. If the ingredient list shows sugar, it’s been added in addition to the naturally occurring sugars.

What you can do besides checking the ingredient list is scan the labels of many different brands of sauces. Look at the carb and sugar content. It’ll be pretty obvious which is best. I use Classico brand, usually the fire-roasted tomato & garlic variety. About 8 carbs, with 2 of those coming from fiber, and no added sugar in the ingredient list. That’s pretty darn low as far as pasta sauces go.


#34

Chris,

When I first read about this I thought “Alton Brown”. You should get him to do a show on these recipies!


#35

[quote]loneiguana wrote:
Chris,

When I first read about this I thought “Alton Brown”. You should get him to do a show on these recipies![/quote]

Alton lost 50 pounds last year and dedicated a show to it recently. Not exactly my style of dieting, but hey, 50 pounds lost is pretty cool.

But yeah, if he turned that genius food-geek mind to making healthy stuff, the world would be a leaner and tastier place.

FYI, a quote from Alton:

“I’ve struggled with weight all my life, and probably always will. But I was on my most recent book tour I was shocked by the number of overweight families,” he says. “People would come up to me and say, ‘Oh, we love the Food Network.’ Well, no (expletive); did you eat the TV? There’s only four of you and you can’t ride in an elevator together. I’ll probably make fat people angry, but we need, as a culture, to be ashamed. It’s not healthy.”


#36

My g/f made this for me the last time she visited, and it was AWESOME…we used the recipe from T-Wrecks’s link since you hadn’t posted yours yet. The pics looks a little greasy (it was) and we had already torn it in half so I’m sure we’re not going to win any awards for presentation, but damn was it good.

Toppings were turkey pepperoni, bacon (the real stuff), hamburger, onions, green peppers, mushrooms, and mozzarella.

The only problem we had was it sticking to the foil on the pan. I think if we just put it right on the pan, there shouldn’t be as much problem. was just being lazy and didn’t want to wash the pan afterward!

Looking forward to trying your new recipe Chris. Thanks.


#37

VT: Makes me want pizza for breakfast! Nice!

I’m going to learn to make my own BBQ sauce then try a barbeque chicken cauliflower pizza.


#38

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:

FYI, a quote from Alton:

“I’ve struggled with weight all my life, and probably always will. But I was on my most recent book tour I was shocked by the number of overweight families,” he says. “People would come up to me and say, ‘Oh, we love the Food Network.’ Well, no (expletive); did you eat the TV? There’s only four of you and you can’t ride in an elevator together. I’ll probably make fat people angry, but we need, as a culture, to be ashamed. It’s not healthy.”[/quote]

That is probably the best and truest Alton Brown quote I’ve ever heard. Where did you find that one?


#39

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
VT: Makes me want pizza for breakfast! Nice!

I’m going to learn to make my own BBQ sauce then try a barbeque chicken cauliflower pizza. [/quote]

I had the rest of it for breakfast the following morning - I love cold pizza.
I also tried the BBQ chicken yesterday actually, with cheddar, mushrooms, and onions. Though I used the Kraft light - it has like 4g carbs/serving…the concept is a total WIN!


#40

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
VT: Makes me want pizza for breakfast! Nice!

I’m going to learn to make my own BBQ sauce then try a barbeque chicken cauliflower pizza. [/quote]

Chris,

Here’s one to get you started, courtesy George Stella (he lost 265 lbs. without surgery) and Food Network:

[i]No-Cook Low Carb Bourbon Barbecue Sauce:

29 ounces no sugar added tomato sauce

6 ounces no sugar added tomato paste

2 ounces bourbon

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 tablespoons liquid smoke

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1/2 tablespoon hot sauce

3/4 cup sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)

1/4 cup brown sugar substitute, optional (recommended: Sugar Twin brand)

2 tablespoons red onion, finely chopped

1 small clove garlic, minced

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon onion powder

Combine sauce ingredients in a bowl and whisk well to combine. Reserve.[/i]

I’ve used it before and it has a fantastic taste and worked at least as well as any traditional sauce. Shouldn’t be to hard modify it for your tastes.