Biotest

Flatbread Frenzy


#1

[center]Low-Carb Flatbread & Pizza Crust [/center]
[center] [/center]
I love it when one recipe will make two things. It’s like killing two birds with one stone… and then getting to eat those birds.

This recipe makes a great pizza crust and a great flatbread or cracker substitute. Check it out:

The Stuff

2 cups almond flour

2 omega-3 enriched eggs

1 cup of low-fat shredded cheese of choice (mozzarella and parm blend is great for pizza; cheddar is good for flatbread. Up to you.)

Dried herbs of choice (basil, oregano, garlic, etc.)

1/8 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

How to Make the Stuff

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

  2. Mix everything together, then make a big “dough ball” out of it.

  3. Smash onto a pizza pan sprayed with olive oil, or place on a parchment paper-lined pan for easy clean-up. Smash thinner for flatbread; leave thicker for pizza crust.

  4. Bake for around 15 minutes, longer if you prefer it crispier, even longer if you want it black and charred, but I don’t recommend that.

[center] [/center]
4. If making into pizza, add toppings and put it back in the oven until everything melts together (5 to 10 minutes). If making flatbread, use a pizza cutter to cut into whatever shapes you want.

Here’s my favorite way to use it:

[center]Mexican Pizza [/center]
[center] [/center]

  1. Make crust as described above, only use cumin, dried cilantro, or whatever Mexican spices you prefer.

  2. Instead of pizza sauce, use canned enchilada sauce. Look for the kind that doesn’t use flour. Use as much as you want.

  3. Top with lean ground beef or turkey that you’ve pre-browned in a pan.

  4. Top with Rotel Mexican blend (canned diced tomatoes), sliced canned chilies, and your favorite low-fat shredded Mexican cheese blend.

  5. Return to oven for a few minutes to melt everything together.

NOTE: Like this? Checkout our new recipe section <a href="http://velocity.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_bodybuilding_velocity_recipe?pageNo=1&s=forumsNavTop"target=“new”>HERE and add your own!


#2

Same recipes, but made a tuna melt with it. This was awesome!


#3

Should go great with Hellfire Guac too: http://velocity.t-nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_bodybuilding_velocity_recipe/velocity_life_hellfire_guac


#4

Got to say I am very excited to try this out. I am making my groc. list now and getting ready to drive 25 miles to buy the things to make this stuff. Thanks a bunch Chris.


#5

Chris, that looks amazing!

you’re going to make me go broke buying 50lbs of almond flour a week to make all of these awesome recipe ideas. but for that, i am thankful.


#6

Looks like flatbread, salsa, and guac is my next snack of choice for the next Cowboys game. And maybe a pizza, too!


#7

Wonderful Chris, wonderful.


#8

[quote]BARDUKE wrote:
Chris, that looks amazing!

you’re going to make me go broke buying 50lbs of almond flour a week to make all of these awesome recipe ideas. but for that, i am thankful.[/quote]

The place where I get my bulk almond flour (http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/blanchedalmondflour5lb.aspx) has a deal where you get it for $24 per five pound bag… if you buy 60 or more bags.

I thought, “Ha! Who’d buy 300 pounds of almond flour at once?”

Then I thought, “Hmmm…”


#9

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:

[quote]BARDUKE wrote:
Chris, that looks amazing!

you’re going to make me go broke buying 50lbs of almond flour a week to make all of these awesome recipe ideas. but for that, i am thankful.[/quote]

The place where I get my bulk almond flour (http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/blanchedalmondflour5lb.aspx) has a deal where you get it for $24 per five pound bag… if you buy 60 or more bags.

I thought, “Ha! Who’d buy 300 pounds of almond flour at once?”

Then I thought, “Hmmm…” [/quote]

Does 300 lb fit inside a 55 gallon garbage can with lid?


#10

Is there a benefit to buying blanched versus regular?


#11

Isn’t this like way more calorie dense than the cauliflower pizza?
More like a V-Bulk meal, is it? The dough without topping must have like 1500 kcal…
Don’t even try to convince me that you just had one slice…


#12

Chris, this looks amazing. I’ve been looking for a nice health food store to buy my own almond flour so I can make this stuff.

Ever tried making your own almond flour, though? I’ve been looking for a solid food processor that doesn’t burn a hole in my pocket so I can just blend some blanched almonds into flour. I honestly thought there was more too almond found than just ground almond ground.


#13

^^ Absolutely it’s calorie dense. Luckily we’ve all been blessed with the ability to exercise self-control regarding how much we make and how much we eat. Plus, not all calories are created equal.


#14

[quote]u r bunk wrote:
Is there a benefit to buying blanched versus regular?[/quote]

Blanched works better than skins-on in just about all recipes. I’ve found this to be my experience, and I’ve also read that in an almond flour cookbook.

Unblanched is probably fine in uncooked recipes, such as my “Sticky Balls” recipe: http://velocity.t-nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_bodybuilding_velocity_recipe/recipe_sticky_balls


#15

[quote]Weevo wrote:
Luckily we’ve all been blessed with the ability to exercise self-control regarding how much we make and how much we eat. [/quote]

There is no such thing as selfcontrol regarding pizza. At least not in my world :slight_smile:


#16

[quote]WebEyE wrote:
Isn’t this like way more calorie dense than the cauliflower pizza?
More like a V-Bulk meal, is it? The dough without topping must have like 1500 kcal…
Don’t even try to convince me that you just had one slice…[/quote]

Yes, this will contain more cals than a vegetable crust.

Not a bulk meal at all in my opinion though. All very clean. Cals may be on the higher side, but I can eat as much of this as I want and never gain an ounce of fat. Why? Because it’s about a whole lot more than “calories in, calories out.” With no insulin reactions, no nasty cravings triggering mechanisms, etc. you can enjoy healthy foods like this all the time. As studies have shown, a person can gain or lose body fat on the same amount of calories. The difference is the source of those calories.

And yep, I eat a little more than half of this in a sitting.

Most people will find that they’ll get full (and stay full) with this much easier than with a carby crust. Good foods help self-regulate calorie intake. Even if you eat the whole darn thing you’ll find that you won’t be hungry again in two hours as with a regular flour-crust pizza.


#17

[quote]Perpalicious wrote:
Chris, this looks amazing. I’ve been looking for a nice health food store to buy my own almond flour so I can make this stuff.

Ever tried making your own almond flour, though? I’ve been looking for a solid food processor that doesn’t burn a hole in my pocket so I can just blend some blanched almonds into flour. I honestly thought there was more too almond found than just ground almond ground. [/quote]

Making it yourself is a mess, and a pain, and doesn’t save much money in the long run, especially if you have to go buy a food processor to do it. Just get it in bulk online.


#18

I use a coffee grinder to make my almond flour an flax flour. It has a capacity of one half cup and it takes around 7 second to get really fine flour. This saves 2 $ per kilo (even on the bulk price) and you can get the grinder for 10 - 15 $.


#19

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Cals may be on the higher side, but I can eat as much of this as I want and never gain an ounce of fat. Why? Because it’s about a whole lot more than “calories in, calories out.” With no insulin reactions, no nasty cravings triggering mechanisms, etc. you can enjoy healthy foods like this all the time.
[/quote]

Thx. Chris. Agree with all of your points, but since I re-started my food log again, it feels quite weired to write down high-cal meals.


#20

[quote]WebEyE wrote:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Cals may be on the higher side, but I can eat as much of this as I want and never gain an ounce of fat. Why? Because it’s about a whole lot more than “calories in, calories out.” With no insulin reactions, no nasty cravings triggering mechanisms, etc. you can enjoy healthy foods like this all the time.
[/quote]

Thx. Chris. Agree with all of your points, but since I re-started my food log again, it feels quite weired to write down high-cal meals.[/quote]

I think food logs are great tools to use… for a time. Helps you to really grasp calories, macronutrient ratios, meal timing, serving sizes etc. I just don’t want people to have to keep a food log forever. Much easier to just choose healthy, volumized, low or no-grain stuff, and just eat instinctively. Takes a while to get the hang of it, especially if old habits and food addictions linger.

If you think about it (or if you’re old like me) counting calories became the vogue thing to do amongst the masses right about the time that the low-fat, high carb trend began. Why? I think it’s because it’s very easy to overeat carby foods. You just don’t get full or stay full very easily. But with higher fat, higher protein, lower carb foods you do, and it’s easier to self-regulate. Just some thoughts!