Biotest

Fermented Foods


#1

Two questions:

  1. I have seen some jars of kimchi that state the protein content is 15 g. from just four small pieces. How is this possible? Does the fermentation process somehow increase the protein content of the cabbage?

  2. Dill pickle jars state zero calories for a whole pickle. How is a whole cucumber zero calories?

Thanks!


#2
  1. I just checked the jar of kimchi in my fridge. It says 1g per serving. My guess is that you have a foreign-made product. In my experience at the local Asian food store, the labels from oversees food makers can be way off – lost in translation.

  2. It may not be truly 0 calories, but labels can claim such if the serving size is small. Still, pickles are darn close to 0 cal, so no worries.


#3

Thanks, Chris! Regarding the kimchi, that was my guess.

As for the pickles, that’s good to hear! I’m guessing the same would hold true for cucumbers (that they are very low in calories)?


#4

[quote]iamthesamurai wrote:
Thanks, Chris! Regarding the kimchi, that was my guess.

As for the pickles, that’s good to hear! I’m guessing the same would hold true for cucumbers (that they are very low in calories)?[/quote]

Yep.

And try pickled okra. Beats the snot out of traditional pickles.


#5

Awesome! Will do!


#6

Is there any type of Kimchi that is ‘better’? mines mat kimchi but have read that some kimchi is not fermented so im not sure


#7

Most kim chee is made from Napa Cabbage, just the spices used change. Sometimes you find different vegetables like cucumber kim chee, daikon kim chee, or some other vegetable. I personally stick with Won Bok (Napa Cabbage) kim chee and cucumber kim chee. Love the crunch of cucumber kim chee.