Biotest

Diet Soda on the V-Diet


#1

What do you think? I’m finishing up week two and I use my hot rox for a jump start but sometimes I feel I’d like to have a little more caffine. Are diet soda’s terrible? I haven’t had any yet but was just wondering. Also what could drink when you have your HSM? I know what to eat but the drink other than water puzzles me. Thanks.


#2

[quote]dheatwole wrote:
What do you think? I’m finishing up week two and I use my hot rox for a jump start but sometimes I feel I’d like to have a little more caffine. Are diet soda’s terrible? I haven’t had any yet but was just wondering. Also what could drink when you have your HSM? I know what to eat but the drink other than water puzzles me. Thanks.[/quote]

  1. From the FAQ: “The fat burner recommended, HOT-ROX Extreme, has some stimulatory properties, so if you’re sensitive to stimulants you may want to go easy on the caffeine-containing beverages.” So, you can have one if you you want.

  2. Unsweetened tea.


#3

Noted, thanks again.


#4

I know this is “Ask Chris” but I want to throw in something good ol’ Jonny Bowden said. (Long story short he thinks Diet Sodas are no good for you.) I’ll copy and paste the mini blog entry as the site is being ballistic:

"The link between soda drinking and obesity is now well established. But what about the diet kind? Two years ago, a study at the University of Texas Health Science Center found that there was a 41% increase in the risk for being overweight for every single can of diet soda a person consumed daily.

But how can something with no calories increase the risk for obesity and heart disease?

There are several possible ways.

One theory is that the sweet taste works in the brain to create a conditioned response, and the body responds as it usually does to normal sugarâ??with insulin, the fat storing hormone. Those circuits in the brain are pretty primitiveâ??as far as your brain is concerned, sweet means sugar. It’s entirely possible that physiologically, you would respond to aspartame in the same way as you would to table sugar. It’s only a theory, but it makes sense.

Second, sweetness creates its own cravings. Just as a taste of rum creates an unstoppable craving in an alcoholic, it’s entirely possible that the taste of sweetâ??even if it’s fakeâ??creates the same cascade of cravings in a carb addict that regular sugar does, leading to overeating and binging and all the rest of the reasons people put on weight.

Third, many people think that by drinking diet beverages they’re “saving” calories and they subconsciously allow themselves to eat more, figuring it’s not doing as much harm because overall their meal has less calories since they’re drinking a diet drink. The diet drink gives them subconscious “permission” to eat more. This isn’t conscious, but it’s totally real.

Then there’s the heart disease connection. Aspartame is primarily made from three ingredientsâ??aspartic acid, phenylalanine and methanol. Methanolâ??an alcoholâ??breaks down in the body to formaldehyde, a poison if there ever was one. Exposing children to formaldehyde levels as low as .75 mg daily for several months has been shown to cause gradual toxicity. Plus, diet soda is frequently stored in hot warehouses, causing even more breakdown that went undetected in the original studies that looked at “ideal” conditions.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t need a double blind randomized controlled study to prove to me that water puts out fire. Soda is bad news, whether regular or diet. Period.

With diet sodaâ??as with sugarâ??less is more and none is better.

If you’re going to use sweetener, I suggest you try Xylitol. It actually tastes like sugar, can be used for cooking and baking, has some health benefits (like preventing bacterial adhesion which is why it’s so good in chewing gums) and as a sugar alcohol, has a very low glycemic load.

Meanwhile, forget about the diet Cokes. They don’t help you lose weight and they may be contributing to a host of other problems you don’t want or need."


#5

I’ve found that when I drop the diet pop containing aspartame my digestive signaling seems to work better. That is, when my stomach is empty, my intestines seem to get the proper signals to digest, and when the duodenum is empty it signals my stomach to produce acid and be honest-to-god hungry. There are some extensive hormonal control loops between the intestines, stomach, liver and pancreas to coordinate activities. I think the artificial sweeteners disrupt the signalling, hence they tend to cause improper digestion and obesity.

I have absolutely no evidence of this though other than my personal experience.

I get diet pop with stevia in it from the health food store and that seems fine, but it’s a little over a buck a can. (Zevia is the brand.)


#6

Guess my digestive signaling is fine, and I also am able to calculate my caloric intake without massively overcompensating for a zero-calorie beverage. So basically I eat the same, whether I had a diet soda or a water, and it makes no difference in my personal experience.

Xylitol, though, now there’s a truly powerful chemical. I can’t vouch for the health benefits but the laxative effects are profoundly noticeable.

Oh, and if diet soda indeeds does something to insulin then couldn’t we just include it in the PWO protocols? Vanilla Coke Zero protein shake could be killer.


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