Biotest

Coping Tips for V-Dieters

I am starting this topic in the hope of gathering here tips for all, and from all, about how do you cope with obstacles and challenges when they appear: Thinking about throwing in the towel, feeling that the program is too stressful to handle in this moment because of work or family issues, the urges of devouring the whole fridge content, feeling depressed-anxious, or any other real or perceived obstacle that threatens our goals.

As I am the one proposing the topic, here is my behaviour tip (from conductual strategies). If you have a recurring feeling (fear of failure, food urges, etc), wear a tiny red lace in your wrist (it can be a chain, a ring, etc…) to remind you the internal dialogue that you have chosen to fight back (rationalize) those damaging defeating feelings.

Thanks for hearing!!!

Tell yourself you are full and very satisfied after every shake, in between shakes, and all the time.

Lots of tips here: http://www.t-nation.com/programs/vdiet30/vDietProgram010.jsp

And here’s one more I think I’ve had published elsewhere, but it certainly fits here. Sort a little mini-article/rant:

[center]Be the OutCast[/center]

I received an email the other day from a V-Dieter that went something like this:

“Chris, I have to attend a dinner at a restaurant for my company, but it doesn’t fall during my solid meal day. What can eat that won’t blow my V-Diet?”

My answer shocked her:

“You can drink your usual shake before you go and eat nothing, or you take your shake with you to the restaurant.”

She was practically livid. What would people think!? What would they say? How would she explain herself?

The problem here is her mindset. Why is she afraid of being different? Why does she have such a desire to fit in, even when “fitting in” means doing something counter to her goals? What, is she going to get fired for not eating a plate of pasta and breadsticks at the Olive Garden? What’s the worry?

As a social species, we all have the desire to fit in, to belong to a group. But in terms of fitness and health, to “fit in” today would mean being overweight and a slave to toxic foods and unhealthy habits.

I prefer to be the outcast, don’t you? Yes, you are going to stand out during and after the V-Diet. You are going to do something most people won’t even attempt to do.

The correct mindset is this:

“I am going to so something completely radical in order to make a fast, radical change in my body and my life. Some people will think I’m crazy. That’s okay. I don’t want to be like them anyway. I want to stand out. I want to achieve what they can’t achieve. I’m different. I am not average. Average is fat and unhealthy. I am above average. My dedication will make people uncomfortable. They may try to sabotage me. That’s okay too. This is fun. This is an adventure. It makes me interesting and different. After I’m done, those average people will ask me how they can be ‘crazy’ too, and I will help them.”

For 28 days you’re going to be different. Embrace it. I give you permission to stand out. You’re different. Stronger. Better. Be the outcast.

Thanks a lot Chris!

Thanks a lot Chris!

One thing that keeps me going after even a few days is just knowing that if I quit, then I completely suffered those days for NOTHING! Talk about a complete and utter waste. And the further you go, the worse it will be if you quit. More wasted days when you could be closing in on the finish line. Why suffer, endure, and sacrifice so much and NOT reap the full benefit.

I guarantee if you stop at 2 weeks, you would be right back where you started in another 2 weeks. NOT WORTH QUITTING!

"FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION"
Gene Krantz

[quote]scorpion69 wrote:
One thing that keeps me going after even a few days is just knowing that if I quit, then I completely suffered those days for NOTHING! Talk about a complete and utter waste. And the further you go, the worse it will be if you quit. More wasted days when you could be closing in on the finish line. Why suffer, endure, and sacrifice so much and NOT reap the full benefit.[/quote]

My thoughts EXACTLY! Well said :slight_smile:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
Lots of tips here: http://www.T-Nation.com/programs/vdiet30/vDietProgram010.jsp

And here’s one more I think I’ve had published elsewhere, but it certainly fits here. Sort a little mini-article/rant:

[center]Be the OutCast[/center]

I received an email the other day from a V-Dieter that went something like this:

“Chris, I have to attend a dinner at a restaurant for my company, but it doesn’t fall during my solid meal day. What can eat that won’t blow my V-Diet?”

My answer shocked her:

“You can drink your usual shake before you go and eat nothing, or you take your shake with you to the restaurant.”

She was practically livid. What would people think!? What would they say? How would she explain herself?

The problem here is her mindset. Why is she afraid of being different? Why does she have such a desire to fit in, even when “fitting in” means doing something counter to her goals? What, is she going to get fired for not eating a plate of pasta and breadsticks at the Olive Garden? What’s the worry?

As a social species, we all have the desire to fit in, to belong to a group. But in terms of fitness and health, to “fit in” today would mean being overweight and a slave to toxic foods and unhealthy habits.

I prefer to be the outcast, don’t you? Yes, you are going to stand out during and after the V-Diet. You are going to do something most people won’t even attempt to do.

The correct mindset is this:

“I am going to so something completely radical in order to make a fast, radical change in my body and my life. Some people will think I’m crazy. That’s okay. I don’t want to be like them anyway. I want to stand out. I want to achieve what they can’t achieve. I’m different. I am not average. Average is fat and unhealthy. I am above average. My dedication will make people uncomfortable. They may try to sabotage me. That’s okay too. This is fun. This is an adventure. It makes me interesting and different. After I’m done, those average people will ask me how they can be ‘crazy’ too, and I will help them.”

For 28 days you’re going to be different. Embrace it. I give you permission to stand out. You’re different. Stronger. Better. Be the outcast.

[/quote]

The majority would rather die than embarrass themselves.

Chris and Scorpion said it best, but here are some additional thoughts based on my experiences. Any time you are trying to break an old habit or instill a new one, you’re going to be constantly faced with temptations and disruptions: travel for business, going out with friends, unpleasant relatives coming to visit, someone close to you has problems and needs help, etc.

If you want to get really good at handling these challenges in stride, and not being a slave to your habits, there is no better strategy than PRACTICE! Think of the V-Diet as a really fantastic opportunity to get experience with habit-modification. Sticking to this diet will enable you to develop your skills of self-control that will help you in many other areas of your life. Self-control is like a muscle that can be developed with training.

Think of it this way – all of the Muslims in the world right now are fasting every day for a month, with no food at all during the day. Especially for those in the west, they are constantly faced with temptations to cheat. And thousands of people are trying to stop smoking on any given day. In that sense, you have a lot of company who are also trying to modify difficult social habits like you, right at this moment.

Honestly, I think this is one major reason that Judaism, Hinduism, and Islam have restrictions on eating. As long as humans have been around, mealtimes have been the quintessential combination of habit and social intimacy. Dietary restrictions teach followers of these religions to impose self-control on both their habits and their social interactions.

For people like us, who probably don’t have these religious dietary restrictions, we lose a valuable character-building practice. Every time a Hindu eats vegetarian with a group of westerners, or a Muslim holds to Ramadan during a business lunch, it reinforces something positive for them. I wish we were taught that kind of self-control from an early age! With this in mind, for about 10 years now, I have gone on one or two 40-day “habit modification fasts” every year. I normally pick something that has become a really solid habit, and “break” it. If I’ve been walking to the cafe with my co-workers to drink herbal tea every day, I switch to water. If I’ve been eating lots of red meat, I switch entirely to chicken and fish for a month.

It doesn’t have to be a bad habit; just a powerful habit, and one that involves social activity. I highly recommend doing this once a year, since you learn a lot. You start to realize that your coping strategies are a lot more numerous than you used to think, and you get more confident at deploying them. With each small step you take, it’s more fun. Sometimes you can complete a fast without anyone even noticing you were on it, and this can be a really rewarding challenge.

So that’s my bottom line: losing some bodyfat is a good reason to try the V-Diet, but an even better reason is because its a perfect exercise to develop your skills of habit modification under social pressure. It has the three most essential characteristics:

  1. It involves habits that are hard to break
  2. It involves social pressure
  3. It’s straightforward to measure whether you are doing it right or not. You are either following the rules or not; no ambiguity or wiggle room (same as a rule like “don’t eat pork”, or “don’t eat meat”).
    What could be more perfect than that?

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
She was practically livid. What would people think!? What would they say? How would she explain herself?
[/quote]

I had practically the same discussion with my husband (my hero) last night. I told him how stressed out I was about a pending girls day with my best friend to celebrate her birthday and he suggested that I could still stay with the V-Diet by taking my shakes with me. I looked at him like he was crazy. What?! NOT indulge with her? I’d be a bad friend!!!

He didn’t argue, but he gave me that look and I knew he was right (though it took me a while to admit it to myself). I was just looking for him to give me an excuse to cheat and he wouldn’t. He helped me realize that there really are no excuses - if I get off the diet, I don’t get the results. No matter how “good” my reason for cheating, the result is still the same. The layers of bullshit that I’m digging through with myself are just amazing. I’m not sure what’s going to be the bigger makeover; my ass or my attitude.

I’m not sure what’s going to be the bigger makeover; my ass or my attitude.

That’s fantastic! I’ll have to remember this one when I want to make another snarky comment to ‘well meaning people.’

[quote]msmit002 wrote:
I’m not sure what’s going to be the bigger makeover; my ass or my attitude.

That’s fantastic! I’ll have to remember this one when I want to make another snarky comment to ‘well meaning people.’[/quote]

Well, so far, my ass is smaller but not entirely in thanks to my attitude, which is continuously trying to convince me to quit and stuff something crunchy and salty into my mouth. “Just a little taste of that warm french bread” it whispers to me. “Just a little bite of that yummy homemade chicken gumbo … Just one of those tasty chicken wings” It’s like one of those toxic people Chris writes about has camped out in my head and keeps telling me this is all stupid and impossible. I’d really like to shut the SOB up! It’s the worst in the middle of the afternoon when I’ve hit that low point. I’m mentally tired with work and need something to reboot with. It’s become obvious I used snacking in the past to take a mental break with and without that, I’m a little lost. And a tad cranky. Maybe more than a tad. I’ve got 20 minutes before my next shake. I’m good for nothing until I get it.

Try some spicy cinnamon gum. If it’s too bad, get up and go for a walk. That helped me.

[quote]msmit002 wrote:
Try some spicy cinnamon gum. If it’s too bad, get up and go for a walk. That helped me.[/quote]

:slight_smile: Orbit Mist Mango Surf. I don’t know why, but it helps. Today was better, I think b/c it was not a work-out day.

I think I’m also just determined to stick to this miserable stinking diet whether or not I lose another pound b/c I just can’t stand the idea of giving in. I mean, what if I were a starving kid in Africa? Am I really so pathetic that I can’t get through a measly 28 days of … eating? No way am I quitting.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Disclaimer: Individual results may vary.