Biotest

Christian Thibaudeau Update


#1

About a month ago, I received a package from Biotest founder Tim Patterson. It contained something very new, something that’s never been seen before in the supplement world. It was Micro-PA, and Tim explained to me how it worked and how to use it.

I was naturally excited, but I also had a secret: I’d been hit with an avalanche of health issues, including a condition that I thought would keep me from optimally utilizing Micro-PA. I didn’t want to tell him, but I also didn’t want to waste six bottles of this new supplement. In the end, I had to come clean with Tim. Now I’m going to come clean with you.

Starting in 2006 (the last time I competed in bodybuilding) I started to lose blood in my stools. It would happen intermittently for a few days, up to a week or two, then it would stop. My father and brother were prone to it too, so I didn’t make much of it. Then in 2008 I was stung by an exotic bug while on my honeymoon in Aruba. Upon getting back to Canada I started to have pneumonia-like symptoms. I kept training despite all of that.

I eventually started to have a hard time breathing properly and was retaining a lot of water. After a few days I got admitted to the hospital for congestive heart failure. It was due to two things (1) I had an pre-existing heart birth defect, which I knew about already, and (2) I suffered a viral cardiomyopathy: a virus transmitted by the bug that spread to the heart. I got put on blood pressure medication at that point.

Not knowing any better, I did what many normal people did. When I started to feel better I stopped taking the meds. I’m an athlete, I’m in good shape, so I don’t need it.

Fast forward to 2013.

After spending a summer doing a lot of CrossFit training with my wife, I fell in love again with Olympic lifting and decided to train for a comeback. I would do a form of squat, snatch and clean & jerk every day, often twice a day. That’s when I started to have severe bloody stools. I also started to lose weight.

In fact (and this is no joke) I was eating twelve hamburgers on average and a full box of cereal every single day (and that was just my “base”). Despite eating roughly 5000 calories a day I was losing weight at a fairly fast rate. The bloody stools lasted for three months, until one day I started to have chest pain when I trained. Then the chest pain lasted throughout the day. I got admitted to the hospital for a heart attack.

The cause of the heart attack wasn’t the heart itself or anything I did, but the fact that I lost so much blood over a three month period that I didn’t have enough red blood cells to send oxygen to the heart. My red blood cell count was 25% of the normal level.

They ran several tests to find out what the cause of the bleeding was. They probably ran every test possible, short of a gynecologic exam! Colonoscopy, rectoscopy, nuclear imaging, MRI, echography, etc. All turned out negative for anything major. They concluded that it was due to the bleeding hemorrhoids, but because of all the squatting and Olympic lifting I was doing the veins could never get repaired. That was the good news, an easy fix.

The bad news is, while running the various blood and urinary tests they found some potential signs of kidney problems. Because of that they asked for a kidney biopsy. The diagnosis? I was suffering from a condition called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, an irreversible condition that would change a lot of things for me.

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis has many causes. One of the contributing factors is the use of anabolic steroids. I won’t lie, I did use steroids in the past. I do believe it possibly contributed to some extent. I used them for a brief period when I was a 19 years old football player and also when I did bodybuilding competitions in 2005. So there is a possibility that these things caused some damage at that point. I’m glad my usage was brief and that I’d stopped long ago or things could’ve been worse.

So the first thing I had to change was my diet. I have to eat “kidney friendly diet”, which is something that can be devastating to muscle growth. Heck, just having a kidney disease is normally one of the most catabolic medical conditions you can have. It also meant that I couldn’t train as much as I normally did for fear or aggravating my condition.

I honestly saw myself as probably ending up at 175 pounds or so within 6 months. It didn’t help that the cardiologist told me that I “could still train, but that it might be easier to shoot for the marathon runner look” and that my nephrologist told me to expect a drastic change in how my body looked. Needless to say I was less than enthusiast about my prospects! Well, one week after I got the news about my condition I received the package from Tim, and I couldn’t even eat properly to maximize growth. Tim advised me to take Micro-PA anyway and report my findings.

Well, after 4 weeks my physique showed significant improvements. In fact, I’m getting more comments from people at the gym telling me how good I look than at any point in my life. I’m absolutely gaining muscle and my strength is steadily improving despite a condition and diet that I believed would destroy my muscle.

Currently, I’m training four basic strength lifts three times per week (bench, deadlift, chins, military press). I’ve improved in EVERY lift at EVERY workout. Not bad considering that, from a medical perspective, I should be slowly losing everything I’d worked to achieve.

My goals are different now. Because of my condition I have to maintain a lighter bodyweight and keep my blood pressure as low as possible. So I’m shooting for a super-lean body with the muscle shape and hardness of the old-school strongmen. With Micro-PA, it’s working!

Despite all that, despite being unable to do everything ideally to build muscle and strength, I’m able to improve my physique and my performance levels. I changed the way I train and Micro-PA allows me to get the maximal anabolic response I can hope to achieve, and I’m loving the way my body is starting to look. I also feel a lot better, healthier.

I know Micro-PA is helping me build the muscle and strength I’d never be able to achieve without it. I can’t wait to see what it does for everyone else!

Christian Thibaudeau


#2

This is gonna be a fun ride. I’m excited about training again and making a ton of cool changes! I can’t wait to help you guys get the most out of Micro-PA!


#3

Very sorry to hear about your health issues.


#4

[quote]Mr_Magoo wrote:
Very sorry to hear about your health issues.[/quote]

I wont lie, it’s not fun. But honestly it is not affecting me negatively. I’m enjoying training A LOT once again (I was stuck in a rut for a few months) and there is something liberating about being able to see progress again when you thought that you were doomed.

I honestly believe that I can achieve my best shape ever within the next 3-4 months.


#5

CT,

Sorry to hear about your medical condition, but it’s awesome that Micro-PA is working for you. The marathon runner look isn’t for you.

I started Micro-PA yesterday and I am also shooting for a super-lean body with the muscle shape and hardness of the old-school strongmen. I can’t wait to see your new training.


#6

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Mr_Magoo wrote:
Very sorry to hear about your health issues.[/quote]

" there is something liberating about being able to see progress again when you thought that you were doomed."

[/quote]

THIS! THIS! THIS!!


#7

CT,

I’m looking forward to watching you crush this condition like you do everything else!

I will definitely be following your journey as well as giving Micro-PA a try.

Good luck and God bless!


#8

I changed the way I’m training. I basically have 3 types of workouts now:

  1. Basic Strength: I picked 4 basic lifts (deadlift, bench press, chin-ups, military press) and I perform 2 preparation sets and 3 work sets for each.

The two preparation sets are done using 60 and 70% of my maximum on a lift (approximately) and the eccentric portion of the lift is done very slowly (roughly 6 seconds to lower the weight) and lift the weight normally.

Studies have shown that mTor is activated mostly by the eccentric component of a lift BUT that 60-70% of your maximum load is all you need to get the effect. So with those first two sets I turn on mTor, warm-up the joints and get my groove down.

Then the first work set is my heaviest, it’s an all out effort. The weight I picked for the first workout was a tad arbitrary (I picked 85% but any load that you can lift 4-6 times is fine). And with that weight I do as many complete reps as I can.

For the second set I reduce the load by 10% and perform 1 more rep than I achieved in the first set (so it’s not necessarily an all out set). For example if I got 5 reps in the first set, I do 6 reps with 10% less in the second set.

In the third set I reduce the weight by another 10% and perform 1 more rep compared to the 2nd set. So if I got 5 reps in set no.1 and 6 reps in set no.2, then I do 7 reps with 10% less than set number two.

PROGRESSION: Every workout I try to either add more weight or do more reps. IF I CAN REACH 6 REPS IN THE FIRST SET I ADD 5-10LBS IN THE NEXT WORKOUT. If I only get 3-5 reps I stick to the same weight for the next workout.

The basic strength workout is done 3 times a week.

  1. Gymnastic rings/Old-school strongman stunts

This is more of a “practice day” than a pure lifting day. On this day I do practice drills for the front lever on rings as well as practice old-school lifts like the bent press, single handed military press, single handed snatch, single handed deadlift, etc. While I’m trying to add weight over time none of these sessions are maximal. Quality of movement is the most important. And for the lift I imagine that I’m performing in front of an audience and have to make the weights look effortless.

I have one or two of these sessions a week and they normally last 30-40 minutes.

  1. Quick lifts. This is basically practicing the snatch and clean & jerk. Right now I’m focusing on technique and ease of lifting instead of adding weight. Just like with the old-school strongmen lifts I’m trying to make these look effortless.

Right now I have one of those sessions a week (I’m still recovering from hemmorhoids surgery).

BASICALLY, the theme is to keep the workouts short and the volume fairly low. Focus on progression either in weight, reps or ease of performance. So far I’m not dieting super hard (I’m still adjusting to having to eat a low protein/moderate-to-high carbs/moderate fat/super low sodium diet) and I’m getting leaner while improving weekly.


#9

Sorry to hear about your health issues, but it sounds like you have the perfect attitude towards it. I look forward to following your progress. All the best.


#10

Damn, I saw you mention health issues a while ago, but I didn’t realize it was this bad! Really glad you’re doing better know.


#11

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
I changed the way I’m training.[/quote]

Is this to account for your health/diet, to maximize Micro-PA, or simply stuff you’re playing around with now?


#12

[quote]furo wrote:
Sorry to hear about your health issues, but it sounds like you have the perfect attitude towards it. I look forward to following your progress. All the best.[/quote]

Well… to be honest it was almost a relief to learn about my issues. You know, what’s hard is not so much having a diagnosed health problem but having something wrong with you and not knowing the reason.

For a few years (since 2008 in fact) I never felt quite right. As soon as my body weight would go above 220, even if it was muscle, I started to feel bad and all of a sudden when I started to make solid progress I would begin to look smooth and soft for no reason.

Now I know the reason and what to do to prevent all that from happening. Sure I have a Damocles sword hanging over my head, but I know what to do to prevent it from dropping… much better than not knowing where the next blow is gonna be coming from and how to avoid it.

And since I can still progress with my training it’s all good!

I only miss drinking Diet 7Up!!!


#13

[quote]BiP wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
I changed the way I’m training.[/quote]

Is this to account for your health/diet, to maximize microPA, or simply stuff you’re playing around with now?[/quote]

  1. Some changes were made to take advantage of Micro-PA (the slow eccentric sets and slightly higher reps)

  2. Some were to account for my health issues (lowered volume and frequency of HARD lifting)

  3. Some are due to me doing what I love doing (OL, rings, strongman stuff)

But the results got me REALLY enthusiastic… I wrote 45 pages for a new book so far… I’m pretty sure that this is exciting enough for me to finish this book this time around :wink:


#14

[quote]BiP wrote:
Damn, I saw you mention health issues a while ago, but I didn’t realize it was this bad! Really glad you’re doing better know.[/quote]

Well, it sounds worse than it is… in reality it’s one issue that led to several other ones…

The birth defect and hemorhoidal bleeding led to the heart issue and having to take blood pressure meds; the avoidance of taking the blood pressure meds led to kidney problems (high blood pressure is one of the biggest cause of kidney damage).

But I’m in a good place right now.


#15

Such a great attitude to have CT,and thanks for sharing all of this with us.Are you running the strength lifts set up in circuit form or finishing one lift then moving on to the next.


#16

[quote]jppage wrote:
Such a great attitude to have CT,and thanks for sharing all of this with us.Are you running the strength lifts set up in circuit form or finishing one lift then moving on to the next.[/quote]

Doing each lift separatly. Once or twice a week I do 20KB swings between every set that gives me about 300-400 swings in a workout and is really helping me get leaner without feeling like I’m trying to get lean.


#17

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jppage wrote:
Such a great attitude to have CT,and thanks for sharing all of this with us.Are you running the strength lifts set up in circuit form or finishing one lift then moving on to the next.[/quote]

Doing each lift separatly. Once or twice a week I do 20KB swings between every set that gives me about 300-400 swings in a workout and is really helping me get leaner without feeling like I’m trying to get lean.[/quote]

That sounds a bit like Dan John’s 10,000 swing routine, which is what I’m currently trying - I’ll be really interested to follow your new style of training. All the best.


#18

[quote]furo wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jppage wrote:
Such a great attitude to have CT,and thanks for sharing all of this with us.Are you running the strength lifts set up in circuit form or finishing one lift then moving on to the next.[/quote]

Doing each lift separatly. Once or twice a week I do 20KB swings between every set that gives me about 300-400 swings in a workout and is really helping me get leaner without feeling like I’m trying to get lean.[/quote]

That sounds a bit like Dan John’s 10,000 swing routine, which is what I’m currently trying - I’ll be really interested to follow your new style of training. All the best.
[/quote]

That’s where I got the idea.

I’m using the strategy with several clients (mostly because that means that I don’t have to talk to them between sets!) and it’s working really well.


#19

Great progress can come out of crisis situation. Sorry to hear it’s health related, but it’s still an opportunity to make positive change and start on a fresh, new path. Stay strong & keep up the great work!.


#20

[quote]CallMeBruce wrote:
Great progress can come out of crisis situation. Sorry to hear it’s health related, but it’s still an opportunity to make positive change and start on a fresh, new path. Stay strong & keep up the great work!. [/quote]

I totally agree. I’m fairly certain that my limitations will help me design more optimal training methods. When the body cannot recover as easily you cannot compensate a less efficient training by doing more volume so you really have to find the BEST way to train