Biotest

Christian Thibaudeau Log 2


#1081

[quote]Evander wrote:
Sigil bro, I’m not CT but I’ve been reading the threads you’ve started or commented in lately, so I know about the issue you’re having.

Wouldn’t it be best to just drop the ring work for now (at least for a while)? Based on what you’ve written, at the moment it clearly isn’t giving you anything in terms of physique development. Besides you seem to have a really strong mental fixation on doing ring work. After all, it’s just one tool in the toolbox.[/quote]

Voice of reason


#1082

[quote]Jake Graves wrote:
CT,
Wondering what your thoughts are on training a muscle three times a week, strengthening different parts each session, for example:
Front squat:
Session 1: main strength and paused squatting
Session 2: top half squat and jump squats
Session 3: zercher training and holds for core and upper back,
Going up to training maxes for the day and using appropriate rep styles for each exercise.

Do you think this may be too much workload?

Thanks,
Jake[/quote]

I often do things like that when focusing on one lift/movement pattern.

However I can’t answer your question. You ask if this is too much workload but you do not provide any info about that workload. Workload is the AMOUNT of work you are doing. You aren’t telling me exactly how many reps per set, sets per exercise, exercise per session and intensity level. All the things that define a workload so I can’t give you an answer


#1083

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Jake Graves wrote:
CT,
Wondering what your thoughts are on training a muscle three times a week, strengthening different parts each session, for example:
Front squat:
Session 1: main strength and paused squatting
Session 2: top half squat and jump squats
Session 3: zercher training and holds for core and upper back,
Going up to training maxes for the day and using appropriate rep styles for each exercise.

Do you think this may be too much workload?

Thanks,
Jake[/quote]

I often do things like that when focusing on one lift/movement pattern.

However I can’t answer your question. You ask if this is too much workload but you do not provide any info about that workload. Workload is the AMOUNT of work you are doing. You aren’t telling me exactly how many reps per set, sets per exercise, exercise per session and intensity level. All the things that define a workload so I can’t give you an answer[/quote]

Sorry my bad!

It was more questioning the idea at the start, i was wondering if this seems more appropriate for strength gains than using three sessions doing the full front squat but using a daily undulating training style .
For me the training types I get in with most are double progression and working up to a rep maximum, i.e 3RM, 5RM, 6RM and then doing a few maximum rep sets after.
So it would be like:
Session 1 - main squat, 3RM plus 5x5 double progression, paused squat, 3 x 5RM with 2rest pause sets
Session 2 - top half, 3RM plus 3 x max reps, jump squats, 10x3
Session 3 - zercher, 3RM plus 3 x max reps, front squat hold, 3/4 x 12 secs

However a problem I always fall back to is adding more and more auxiliary work to such as lunges and leg presses and extensions which I need to pick more carefully, but the above set-up is what I mainly like to use.


#1084

Why bands instead of chains for the end-3rd overhead assistance?


#1085

[quote]LoRez wrote:
Why bands instead of chains for the end-3rd overhead assistance?[/quote]

Have you tried to set up chains properly for a standing overhead movement? :slight_smile:


#1086

Thib, as per previous replies, you can tell I’ve dealing with some problems that I feel no lifter should have. Well…slowly I’m starting to admit to myself that there’s something very wrong and I’m doing anything to help it. I foam roll, stretch, and do mobility and band drills daily now because of the situation I’m in: I can no longer squat, hack squat, lunge, or do anything except leg press or partial leg extension for fear my knees will snap in half as they crack on every rep for the exercises I can’t do. It does make wonder if my mobility and warm-up drills are hurting my goals, but I don’t think that’s possible. My wrists are very messed up now to the point I can no longer supinate without some effort and exercises like bench press will make me stop a set because my wrists can no longer support the weight or it becomes an exercise within itself to hold them. Normally, I would heed the advice to wear wrists wraps…but the weights are nothing!

I used to be able to incline 75’s, and now I’m struggling to get past 55 lb for 15 reps. I also think you may have some expertise for this topic because you also work with athletes who I’m sure suffer injuries due to overuse of patterns or damage out in the field and it is your job to keep them performing optimally during practice and games no matter the situation. I meant that in the nicest possible way, it’s not something you are forced to do, but athletes seek you out for this reason among many. At this point, I now know everything is deteriorating. My elbows crack on every rep when it comes to triceps exercises and the only ones that affect it the least are kickbacks, and cable exercises with partial motion. Taking time off is something I have tried already and it was only a temporary fix. Listening to my friends when they said there’s no way I can be injured with such light weight and refusing to give up, I kept pushing.

This was definitely a part of why I am where I am now but I was too blind and too stubborn to be wiser. Being smarter now, I realize I do not have the solution and neither do my friends. I don’t know whether or not I should pull back, push harder, or stay where I’m at now because it’s the best it’s going to be for now. My first goal is to get stronger wrists that can take any weight I throw at them within reason. Most people have recommended wrist exercises but it’s usually to strengthen forearms, not wrists. Truthfully, I haven’t heard of anyone prescribe work for stronger wrists. It also doesn’t help I have 6.5 inch wrists at a height of 5’11.

I probably have more to say, but in the end, I’m just down in the dumps and hope I can find a solution instead of going backwards or even stagnant. Tbh, I’m not even sure if I’m stating the problem correctly as I wouldn’t be surprised if someone thought I was saying I’m just broken from a first look at my post. Open to any advice you have, Thib. I wish I could be like the rest and work on strength or hypertrophy goals, but I guess I’m just looking to rebuild my foundation.


#1087

Hi Coach!

I have been reading through your black book and stumbled upon some info that is confusing me, and would like to ask to learn more if I may. So in chapter 3-4 you state fiber dominance and the rep/set range for fiber dominance. Than in chapter 5 you state the blocks, and how one should plan those. My first question: If I understand it correctly, If I plan a strenght block for someone who is fast-twitch dominant, than the hypertrophy work to maintain should be done in that optimal range (e.g. 3-5x5 @80%)?

If one plans to follow the layout in the book (1. 3x5 @85%, 2. 3x5 85%, 3x3 90%, etc), how many times could a lift be trained a week? And if it is possible to do more than once, should one reduce the work for the second workout (eg. 3x3-5 @80%)?

The more confusing for me is the planning of a hypertrophy block. How would like take fiber dominance into account there?

The book states: 1. 3x8, 2. 3x8, 3x6, etc. Staying at the fast-twitch dominant topic, would it need to be modified to reach optimal result for someone who is fast twitch dominant (e.g. 4x6, instead of 3x8)?

Also, in a hypertrophy block what is the necessary strenght work to maintain the strenght level (Ramp to 3 RM once a week, ramp to the TM once a week from the previous block, 3x3 90%)?

My last question is regarding hypertrophy in general. Should one always aim for maximum amount of reps that can be completed, if the set and weight is fixed, or the reps should remain and more sets to be added? In english my question would be, if I take a load of 60%, and according to my fiber dominance I should be able to do 2x12 with it, but I am able to do 15, should I do 15, or add a 3 set? Or does it even necessary, and 2x12 will suffice?

How do you take fiber dominance into account when planning a program in general?

Could you please shed some light in these? I am eager to learn more. Thank you for your time in advance, and sorry for the long post :slight_smile:


#1088

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Evander wrote:
Sigil bro, I’m not CT but I’ve been reading the threads you’ve started or commented in lately, so I know about the issue you’re having.

Wouldn’t it be best to just drop the ring work for now (at least for a while)? Based on what you’ve written, at the moment it clearly isn’t giving you anything in terms of physique development. Besides you seem to have a really strong mental fixation on doing ring work. After all, it’s just one tool in the toolbox.[/quote]

Voice of reason[/quote]

Yes that makes sense. The difference now is not emphasizing rings but rather using them for posture, activation and pump. I’m fixated on them because they feel amazing and gets my body activated in a way that’s entirely different than starting with empty barbell for instance.

CT if I could ask here, any advice on how best to set up the lying/chinese barbell row in a commercial gym? Looks like an aamazing exercise and really want to try it out. But do I take a regular bench and set them on top of plates or maybe those step-up platforms?

Thanks.


#1089

[quote]-Sigil- wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Evander wrote:
Sigil bro, I’m not CT but I’ve been reading the threads you’ve started or commented in lately, so I know about the issue you’re having.

Wouldn’t it be best to just drop the ring work for now (at least for a while)? Based on what you’ve written, at the moment it clearly isn’t giving you anything in terms of physique development. Besides you seem to have a really strong mental fixation on doing ring work. After all, it’s just one tool in the toolbox.[/quote]

Voice of reason[/quote]

Yes that makes sense. The difference now is not emphasizing rings but rather using them for posture, activation and pump. I’m fixated on them because they feel amazing and gets my body activated in a way that’s entirely different than starting with empty barbell for instance.

CT if I could ask here, any advice on how best to set up the lying/chinese barbell row in a commercial gym? Looks like an aamazing exercise and really want to try it out. But do I take a regular bench and set them on top of plates or maybe those step-up platforms?

Thanks. [/quote]

Like that but with a barbell… but you need a non-adjustable bench, the adjustable ones have “metal stuff” underneath the bench.


#1090

Is there a big difference between a “Chinese” row and T-bar row besides the angle?
Thanks


#1091

[quote]fnf wrote:
Is there a big difference between a “Chinese” row and T-bar row besides the angle?
Thanks[/quote]

What do you mean “besides the angle”? Back training is ALL about the angle and strength curve. It’s BY FAR the most important thing when it comes to properly stimulate the back. So “only” having a different angle can make all the difference in the world. I never in my life felt a t-bar row properly (either machine or bar in the corner version) but the Chinese row feels great.

That having been said, that’s me. I know some guys who swear by the t-bar row (corner row).


#1092

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]fnf wrote:
Is there a big difference between a “Chinese” row and T-bar row besides the angle?
Thanks[/quote]

What do you mean “besides the angle”? Back training is ALL about the angle and strength curve. It’s BY FAR the most important thing when it comes to properly stimulate the back. So “only” having a different angle can make all the difference in the world. I never in my life felt a t-bar row properly (either machine or bar in the corner version) but the Chinese row feels great.

That having been said, that’s me. I know some guys who swear by the t-bar row (corner row).[/quote]

I know that back training is about angle and strength curve. I learned that from you over the years :slight_smile:

I also don’t feel the T-bar row. Funny thing is the best exercise I feel is the barbell row. Cable rows don’t give that same soreness as when I do a barbell row. Even when I squeeze the back for 2 seconds as you have stated about training the back muscles.

I’ve been using the Chinese row with a barbell and it has allowed me to not worry about my lower back as when I used to do a barbell row standing.


#1093

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
FROM THIB’S DESK (changing the Daily Thib tip title to avoid putting pressure on myself :slight_smile: )

I’m a big fan of the military press, well any form of overhead pressing really. To me overhead pressing is even more important than the bench press and is a better indicator of overall and upper body strength.

The two tendencies I see is lifters having a sticking point at the very beginning of the lift and those with a sticking point in the last 3rd of the movement.

To solve the first issue (weak starting position) my favorite lifts are the standing strict log press (by far the best exercise to use) and the high incline bench press with a pause from the chest.

[/quote]

quand vous dites log press , c’est pour avoir les mains en position neutre (donc avoir une barre le permettant comme une swiss press bar ou barre football ) ou c’est avoir spécifiquement une log press barre ??merci coach


#1094

Hello CT,

I got (again…)some questions about Growth- Factor training:)

1.) are some bodyparts better for growthfactor training then others? E.g shoulders and arms are maybe better for this trainingsytle than legs and chest ?

2.) can you combine growth Factor training into one day? I mean: you only have 1 day time in the morning and want to do shoulders and leg grwoth factor! Do you can do some shoulders than wait 10-15 minututes and start the other bodypart ?

Personal question:
Do you have gained some weight from your a.m. training with Nick?
3.)Is the rep scheme 5-4-3-2-1 with holds (5secs-4-3-2-1) good for a leg grwoth factor training?

4.)Whats your thoughts about adding 5-4-3-2-1 with holds after your double progression 4 sets 6-8 reps in squats? Maybe 1-2 sets

Thanks in advance CT :slight_smile:
P.s is your book progressing?


#1095

Hello CT

I read in an older post that your OVT program is one of the few programs of yours that you would no longer recommend.

What is the reason for this? :slight_smile:


#1096

[quote]Akidara wrote:
Hello CT,

I got (again…)some questions about Growth- Factor training:)

1.) are some bodyparts better for growthfactor training then others? E.g shoulders and arms are maybe better for this trainingsytle than legs and chest ? [/quote]

YES! I find delts, back and biceps to respond the best.

Legs are doable but take too much out of you and I find that it’s not a good investment.

I find that the chest can be “okay” but not as effective as delts and back.

[quote]Akidara wrote:
2.) can you combine growth Factor training into one day? I mean: you only have 1 day time in the morning and want to do shoulders and leg grwoth factor! Do you can do some shoulders than wait 10-15 minututes and start the other bodypart ? [/quote]

I don’t like it. I find that it is suboptimal to do two muscle groups in the same workout when doing maximum pump work. Maybe it’s just me but psychologically both body parts suffer when I try to do max pump for 2: (1) you subconsciously leave something in the tank when working the first muscle (2) you are tired when you come to the second muscle… and also physiologically you will lose the pump for the 1st muscle when working the 2nd and the pump for the second will not be as good.

IT’S NOT AS BAD IF DOING 2 “CONNECTED” MUSCLE GROUPS. For example doing biceps/triceps growth factor can work, in which case I alternate between sets of both.

[quote]Akidara wrote:
Personal question:
Do you have gained some weight from your a.m. training with Nick? [/quote]

No, I wake up at 4:15am, drive 30 minutes to the gym and train really hard to get no gains. What kind of question is that? I wouldn’t do it if it didn’t bring me something. My main goal is not bodybuilding, but if I’m not gonna either get stronger, bigger or leaner from doing something I wont do it.

[quote]Akidara wrote:
4.)Whats your thoughts about adding 5-4-3-2-1 with holds after your double progression 4 sets 6-8 reps in squats? Maybe 1-2 sets
[/quote]

I used the 5-4-3-2-1 w/ holds as part of my layer system, so after 4-6 heavy sets. Yeah it works. But I wouldn’t do it for more than 3 weeks.


#1097

[quote]michael h. wrote:
Hello CT

I read in an older post that your OVT program is one of the few programs of yours that you would no longer recommend.

What is the reason for this? :)[/quote]

That was written 15 years ago. Back then I was just a young kid who trained hard. I had a lot of knowledge on performance training already from training as an Olympic lifter and training athletes. But I had little experience in hypertrophy training.

OVT is something that I did when I got injured in Olympic lifting and decided to build a beach body. At that time I was used to training 4-6 hours a day, Olympic lifting. I could handle humongous training volumes. Didn’t know much about bodybuilding so I simply invented a routine with crazy volume.

It worked in that I got leaner and more muscular. But I didn’t realise how excessive the volume was. Keep in mind that OVT was actually fairly mild in volume and loading for me compared to my Olympic lifting workouts. So I handled it properly. I took me a while to realise that the normal gym rat wasn’t used to that combination of load and volume and would quickly crash on it.

That’s the gist of it. But the whole thing isn’t logical, as I mentioned I didn’t have much experience training for size and am excessive by nature.


#1098

[quote]SWAT06 wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
FROM THIB’S DESK (changing the Daily Thib tip title to avoid putting pressure on myself :slight_smile: )

I’m a big fan of the military press, well any form of overhead pressing really. To me overhead pressing is even more important than the bench press and is a better indicator of overall and upper body strength.

The two tendencies I see is lifters having a sticking point at the very beginning of the lift and those with a sticking point in the last 3rd of the movement.

To solve the first issue (weak starting position) my favorite lifts are the standing strict log press (by far the best exercise to use) and the high incline bench press with a pause from the chest.

[/quote]

quand vous dites log press , c’est pour avoir les mains en position neutre (donc avoir une barre le permettant comme une swiss press bar ou barre football ) ou c’est avoir spÃ??Ã?©cifiquement une log press barre ??merci coach
[/quote]

Pour l’amelioration du depart au military press c’est plus la distance du corps du a la largeur du log, que la position des mains. La swiss/football permet une distance plus grande qu’une barre normale mais pas autant que le log. De plus le log est repose sur la poitrine, ce qui augmente l’amplitude du press and depart.

En fait dans un monde ideal le log aurait une barre longitudinale et non 2 poignee paralleles donc la prise neuter n’est non seulement pas l’element cle, mais est le seul element du log press qui pourrait etre ameliorer.


#1099

Okay, At first I thought it was because of the heavy iso-exercises in the superset.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.


#1100

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]SWAT06 wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
FROM THIB’S DESK (changing the Daily Thib tip title to avoid putting pressure on myself :slight_smile: )

I’m a big fan of the military press, well any form of overhead pressing really. To me overhead pressing is even more important than the bench press and is a better indicator of overall and upper body strength.

The two tendencies I see is lifters having a sticking point at the very beginning of the lift and those with a sticking point in the last 3rd of the movement.

To solve the first issue (weak starting position) my favorite lifts are the standing strict log press (by far the best exercise to use) and the high incline bench press with a pause from the chest.

[/quote]

quand vous dites log press , c’est pour avoir les mains en position neutre (donc avoir une barre le permettant comme une swiss press bar ou barre football ) ou c’est avoir spÃ???Ã??Ã?©cifiquement une log press barre ??merci coach
[/quote]

Pour l’amelioration du depart au military press c’est plus la distance du corps du a la largeur du log, que la position des mains. La swiss/football permet une distance plus grande qu’une barre normale mais pas autant que le log. De plus le log est repose sur la poitrine, ce qui augmente l’amplitude du press and depart.

En fait dans un monde ideal le log aurait une barre longitudinale et non 2 poignee paralleles donc la prise neuter n’est non seulement pas l’element cle, mais est le seul element du log press qui pourrait etre ameliorer.[/quote]

merci coach