Biotest

Built for Bad and Micro PA


#1

CT,
I recently utilized your ‘Built for Bad’ program and saw great results.
What changes, if any, would you suggest to this program to optimize the use of Micro PA?


#2

[quote]DWL wrote:
CT,
I recently utilized your ‘Built for Bad’ program and saw great results.
What changes, if any, would you suggest to this program to optimize the use of Micro PA? [/quote]

Micro-PA will “work” with any type of lifting program. However eccentric actions seem to have the greatest impact on mTor. However you do not need a maximal eccentric (which would require using a load of 100-120% of your max lifting strength); 60-70% of your maximum done super slowly (imagine trying to feel the muscle fibers stretching under load inch by inch) is enough to get the maximal mTor activation.

So what I would recommend is starting the Built for Bad strength circuit with two sets where you use use 60 and 70% for 5 reps on each exercise, with the eccentric phase being performed slowly (4-6 seconds) and the lifting (concentric) phase done normally.

Then you would start the heavier circuits without the sets of 1 and 2 reps. I would also end by doing one circuit of higher reps (6-8).

So the whole thing would look like:

Circuit 1: 60% for 5 reps with slow eccentric
Circuit 2 70% for 5 reps with slow eccentric
Circuit 3: 80% for 5 normal reps
Circuit 4: 82-85% for 4 normal reps
Circuit 5: 87-90% for 3 normal reps
Circuit 6: 70% for 6-8 normal reps


#3

Would you still recommend the SGHP for the sets that are focused on the eccentric phase?


#4

Can we use both scheme ( original and modified version) to periodize the program. Ex: 3 weeks of the original version with 2 excentric warmup circuit and 3 weeks of the modified version with 2 excentric warmup circuit or vice versa?
I guess for HighPull we should keep it explosive?


#5

[quote]PllG wrote:
Can we use both scheme ( original and modified version) to periodize the program. Ex: 3 weeks of the original version with 2 excentric warmup circuit and 3 weeks of the modified version with 2 excentric warmup circuit or vice versa?
I guess for HighPull we should keep it explosive?[/quote]

Yes, the high pull is kept explosive.

When using Micro-PA sets of super low reps will not make the most of the product’s benefits. So the original set-up wouldn’t be as effective.


#6

Another question, a circuit of your 4 mains lifts (deadlift, Bench press, chin up, military press) done with a scheme like: 4-6 reps ~85%, 5-7 reps ~75%, 6-8 reps 65% amd 2 warm up excentric round. Is it fine or you think it’s not a good idea. I won’t changed the Built for Bad circuit, I’m just thinking outloud about ways to manage mTOR activation with circuit program style.


#7

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
When using Micro-PA sets of super low reps will not make the most of the product’s benefits. So the original set-up wouldn’t be as effective.[/quote]

Hmmm. So would you recommend those of us doing

  1. Ramp to 1RM 2) Density: Max singles for time 3) Carries
    to switch to
  2. Eccentric focus sets 2) Ramp to 3RM 3) Density: Max triples for time 4) Carries
    When using microPA? My nervous system seems to really like this setup.

#8

[quote]BiP wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
When using Micro-PA sets of super low reps will not make the most of the product’s benefits. So the original set-up wouldn’t be as effective.[/quote]

Hmmm. So would you recommend those of us doing

  1. Ramp to 1RM 2) Density: Max singles for time 3) Carries
    to switch to
  2. Eccentric focus sets 2) Ramp to 3RM 3) Density: Max triples for time 4) Carries
    When using microPA? My nervous system seems to really like this setup.[/quote]

Yes for 1 and 2… for 3 I would do the triples, but using a fairly slow eccentric tempo (not as slow as 1, 3-4 seconds)


#9

Slow tempo density sets - sounds painful :wink:

Thank you!


#10

[quote]BiP wrote:
Slow tempo density sets - sounds painful :wink:

Thank you![/quote]

EEEEEEEE YYYYEEEEEESSSS


#11

CT, I too am on the heavy singles program with amazing results.
With this newer style suited for maximizing MicroPA, Is there any particular adjustments you would make regard the load of weight used during the density layer.

If this is clearer.
The orginaly density for example: 30 singles at 80% 1RM

I was thinking perhaps: 30 reps using 80% of the day’s 3 rep max. Maybe 3 reps every minute on the minute for 9-10 minutes.
The load used would probably be about 72% of a theoretical 1RM. Using around 90% of a 3RM may be closer to the load prescribed in the original article.

Also was wondering of in addition to BiP’s idea:

  1. Eccentric focus sets
  2. Ramp to 3RM
  3. Density: Max triples for time (21-30 reps of 90% of 3RM)
    **4) 30 dips / 30 pull ups in as little time (to be done daily??) **
  4. Carries 3-5 sets (1min duration, 1 min rest period)

#12

[quote]AbsoluteBoxer wrote:
CT, I too am on the heavy singles program with amazing results.
With this newer style suited for maximizing MicroPA, Is there any particular adjustments you would make regard the load of weight used during the density layer.

If this is clearer.
The orginaly density for example: 30 singles at 80% 1RM

I was thinking perhaps: 30 reps using 80% of the day’s 3 rep max. Maybe 3 reps every minute on the minute for 9-10 minutes.
The load used would probably be about 72% of a theoretical 1RM. Using around 90% of a 3RM may be closer to the load prescribed in the original article.

Also was wondering of in addition to BiP’s idea:

  1. Eccentric focus sets
  2. Ramp to 3RM
  3. Density: Max triples for time (21-30 reps of 90% of 3RM)
    **4) 30 dips / 30 pull ups in as little time (to be done daily??) **
  4. Carries 3-5 sets (1min duration, 1 min rest period)

[/quote]

Instead of 30 singles, it’s 10 x 3, from my experience, 80% will be fine is you take roughly 20 sec. between sets. But you can start at 70% and work your way up from there.

You can add the dips and pull-ups to, but I found chin-ups to be superior (chin-ups = supination, pull-ups = pronation) since they will hit the biceps more, filling one of the gaps left by only using big lifts.


#13

Did this for the first time today. Squats. Slow eccentric = not fun!

One thing I’ve noticed is that I found it VERY hard to explode on the sets where I used the slow eccentric. I assume that’s due to minimizing the stretch reflex.

Overall the session felt good, although I skipped bodyweight work (ring chins between sets of ramp, ring dips and rows after carries) to better assess the basic version. Will add them back in tomorrow (bench press day).


#14

[quote]BiP wrote:
Did this for the first time today. Squats. Slow eccentric = not fun!

One thing I’ve noticed is that I found it VERY hard to explode on the sets where I used the slow eccentric. I assume that’s due to minimizing the stretch reflex.

Overall the session felt good, although I skipped bodyweight work (ring chins between sets of ramp, ring dips and rows after carries) to better assess the basic version. Will add them back in tomorrow (bench press day).[/quote]

Yes, the slow eccentric negates the stretch reflex which takes away 10-20% of the force production


#15

CT, I’m very interested in using Micro-PA to help preserve LBM during periods of hypo-caloric intake (which I take from some of your posts about getting lean, you are too). I also have always used some form of full-body training when my main goal was fat loss.

Given that I would be using ample peri-workout nutrition (Indigo-3G, Micro-PA, pre-load Plazma; 2 more Plazma during, 3 scoop MAG-10 1 hr. post, large solid meal 2hrs. Later.), do you think I could benefit from incorporating accentuated eccentrics into my training, with either the 6-6-4-4 (perhaps modify to 6-6-4, or 6-4-4) or the 5-4-3 set/rep parameters applied to the Built for Bad strength circuits? Do you think the eccentrics would be too much in a hypo-caloric state (even with full peri nutrition)?

I’ve been using eccentrics in my training for about the last month, with muscle as my main goal. I have to say it’s been very interesting so far. Somehow I’ve managed to neglect eccentric strength in my quest to focus on concentric strength. I think because I’m an older lifter I’ve become–without really realizing it–somewhat obsessed with maintaining (and improving) how much weight I can lift. The result has been a relative decrease in eccentric strength, but more striking is my relatively poor eccentric strength capacity. I now realise that I need to improve my eccentric strength in order to help maintain and increase my overall lifting performance–including the concentric portion.

As far as results: definite increases in strength and visible increases in muscle mass within a month. I’ve recently added Micro-PA to the mix and I’m really excited to see what this combo can do.

CT, should the eccentrics be phased in and out of your training? If so, how long should they be used before returning to “normal” reps; or is this kind of low volume of eccentrics maintainable indefinitely?

Thanks for all your help,

Crowbar


#16

[quote]crowbar46 wrote:
CT, I’m very interested in using Micro-PA to help preserve LBM during periods of hypo-caloric intake (which I take from some of your posts about getting lean, you are too). I also have always used some form of full-body training when my main goal was fat loss.

Given that I would be using ample peri-workout nutrition (Indigo-3G, Micro-PA, pre-load Plazma; 2 more Plazma during, 3 scoop MAG-10 1 hr. post, large solid meal 2hrs. Later.), do you think I could benefit from incorporating accentuated eccentrics into my training, with either the 6-6-4-4 (perhaps modify to 6-6-4, or 6-4-4) or the 5-4-3 set/rep parameters applied to the Built for Bad strength circuits? Do you think the eccentrics would be too much in a hypo-caloric state (even with full peri nutrition)?

I’ve been using eccentrics in my training for about the last month, with muscle as my main goal. I have to say it’s been very interesting so far. Somehow I’ve managed to neglect eccentric strength in my quest to focus on concentric strength. I think because I’m an older lifter I’ve become–without really realizing it–somewhat obsessed with maintaining (and improving) how much weight I can lift. The result has been a relative decrease in eccentric strength, but more striking is my relatively poor eccentric strength capacity. I now realise that I need to improve my eccentric strength in order to help maintain and increase my overall lifting performance–including the concentric portion.

As far as results: definite increases in strength and visible increases in muscle mass within a month. I’ve recently added Micro-PA to the mix and I’m really excited to see what this combo can do.

CT, should the eccentrics be phased in and out of your training? If so, how long should they be used before returning to “normal” reps; or is this kind of low volume of eccentrics maintainable indefinitely?

Thanks for all your help,

Crowbar[/quote]

to make the most out of Micro-PA and mTor activation, accentuated eccentrics (especially accentuating eccentric via slower a eccentric phase) should be kept in your training at all times. BUT it doesn’t have to be done on every exercise. I find that starting the workout with some eccentric emphasis work, then doing the high threshold work, works best. For someone focusing on adding as much muscle as possible, you would conclude the workout with some pump work or density work where the eccentric would also be emphasized.


#17

CT, thanks for the reply. In terms of a hypo-caloric diet with fat loss as a main goal, do you think incorporating accentuated eccentrics (at a low volume) in every workout is too much to recover from? My feeling is that if kept to a low volume and reasonable intensity (60-70%, no using overload negatives), eccentrics could be used with every workout even while eating hypo-caloric.

As far as the Built for Bad circuits while dieting, do you think your: Eccentrics/ 5-4-3/ 6-8 normal rep set-up is optimal under these conditions, or would you tweet it in some way?

Thanks,

Crowbar


#18

[quote]crowbar46 wrote:
CT, thanks for the reply. In terms of a hypo-caloric diet with fat loss as a main goal, do you think incorporating accentuated eccentrics (at a low volume) in every workout is too much to recover from? My feeling is that if kept to a low volume and reasonable intensity (60-70%, no using overload negatives), eccentrics could be used with every workout even while eating hypo-caloric.

As far as the Built for Bad circuits while dieting, do you think your: Eccentrics/ 5-4-3/ 6-8 normal rep set-up is optimal under these conditions, or would you tweet it in some way?

Thanks,

Crowbar[/quote]

  1. Accentuating the eccentric with loads of 60-70% present very little stress, it’s nothing like supramax eccentric. I see no problem in using a moderate amount long term.

  2. I don’t like to discuss a program originally designed to maximize growth in the context of a caloric deficit. No training program designed to maximize growth will be optimal when ingesting a caloric deficit since the amount of work might be too much.

  3. Micro-PA seems to enhance fat loss via an increase in heat production/metabolic rate and I’ve personally noticed a fat loss effect even though I’m not in a caloric deficit


#19

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

  1. Accentuating the eccentric with loads of 60-70% present very little stress, it’s nothing like supramax eccentric. I see no problem in using a moderate amount long term.
    [/quote]

I’ve got a feeling this technique might actually help with recovery.

It’s a bit early for me to say anything and it COULD be due to shifting some of my protein to carbs, but the during the two sessions when I’ve used accentuated eccentrics at the beginning and during density sets I’ve experienced noticeably bigger pumps.

That plus proper nutrition should improve muscular recovery. And I don’t really feel like the negative neural impact of these eccentrics was big, so overall the effect should be positive.

B.


#20

[quote]BiP wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

  1. Accentuating the eccentric with loads of 60-70% present very little stress, it’s nothing like supramax eccentric. I see no problem in using a moderate amount long term.
    [/quote]

I’ve got a feeling this technique might actually help with recovery.

It’s a bit early for me to say anything and it COULD be due to shifting some of my protein to carbs, but the during the two sessions when I’ve used accentuated eccentrics at the beginning and during density sets I’ve experienced noticeably bigger pumps.

That plus proper nutrition should improve muscular recovery. And I don’t really feel like the negative neural impact of these eccentrics was big, so overall the effect should be positive.

B.[/quote]

BIP, I concur, I’ve been using the accentuated eccentrics at the beginning of a workout with many individuals and all have reported a bigger pump and feeling the muscles more during the rest of their training.