Biotest

Beans as Carbs?


#1

Quick question Chris,

When you make Chili do you factor in the carbs in the beans? If I’m counting my carbs (Indigo) should I make an assumption based on portions of Chili I make, or just factor in clean (rice) carbs that I add to the meal?

Thank you.


#2

A lot of the carbs found in beans are fiber derived so you really can’t count them as you would regular carbs. But that just gets confusing, so when counting carbs I count everything, then add or delete total carbs based on results. It just makes things simple compared to counting carbs then subtracting fiber carbs and “non-impactful” carbs etc. It’s another reason I dislike counting macros all the time – not all carbs are the same and it gets confusing. But count them for now just so you’ll know how to adjust later.


#3

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
“non-impactful” carbs etc. [/quote]

Hi Chris,

Sorry for hijacking this thread but would it be possible to go into more detail about what “non-impactful” carbs would consist of?

A simple link would be fine with a couple examples of foods.

Thanks!


#4

That’s basically a generic (and grammatically incorrect) term for fiber-rich carbs that don’t greatly cause a spike in blood sugar/glucose. In a nutshell, fiber-rich foods fall into this category, and back in the low-carb fanaticism days, foods often listed total carbs and net carbs. Fiber isn’t digested in the small intestine and so isn’t broken down into glucose and absorbed into the blood.

But this practice is somewhat questionable, because things like Atkins chocolate bars started not counting sugar alcohols and questionable things like that toward the carb count. So today it’s not really a good method to use. Just know that beans, veggies, etc. may contain carbs but those don’t impact insulin like, say, carbs from pasta. “A carb is not a carb” as the saying goes. It’s all about good food selection in the end.