Biotest

Almost-Instant Jambalaya


#1

[center] Almost-Instant Jambalaya [/center]
Need some fast protein?

Sick of chicken breasts?

How about a nice anti-cancer, anti-heart-disease boost while you’re at it?

Well then, I’m your pusher, baby.

Here’s a quick recipe for ya: my fast-food, physique-conscious take on New Orleans jambalaya:

Ingredients

Package of pre-cooked turkey or chicken sausage (Andouille is best)
Package of pre-cooked frozen shrimp (medium to large)
Package of frozen pre-chopped onions (found with frozen veggies)
Handful or two of dried parsley flakes
Tablespoon or two of pre-chopped jarred garlic
1 15oz can of tomatoes (stewed, diced, etc.) More if you want.
1 tsp dried thyme
1 to 1.5 cups of water
Rice (optional)
Coconut oil cooking spray

Directions

  1. If you’re using rice, boil a large pot and get your rice going according to package directions. I use a dedicated steamer for mine. Perfect rice every time.

  2. Thaw your shrimp under cold running water and remove tails if needed. (Using hot water would cook the already-cooked shrimp more, making them tough.)

  3. Heat a large pot or cast iron dutch oven, add coconut oil.

  4. Cut sausage into 1 inch pieces.

  5. In the pot, add chopped onions and cook until translucent, then add the garlic and parsley. Stir and cook a minute or two.

  6. Add tomatoes, thyme, salt, and water. Bring to boil.

  7. Add sausage, bring down to simmer, then add shrimp. Cook only until shrimp is hot (a few minutes).

  8. Serve over rice.

Notes

Of course, you can buy fresh ingredients and chop everything yourself, but my goals with this recipe were speed, high protein, and low carb (since I usually skip the rice.) You can also buy uncooked shrimp, fresh garlic cloves and all that, but again I’m going for fast and convenient here.

This comes together in just 15 to 20 minutes and you’ll have enough leftover for several meals.

Oh, by the way, the heath benefits I mentioned come from the garlic and onions. Some info on that here if you’re interested: <a href="http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/8_more_power_foods"target=“new”>8 More Power Foods.

Enjoy this one and, as always, feel free to play around with it and post your variations and pics below!


#2

Sexy action pic.


#3

I buy frozen, tail-on shrimp. About 5 or 6 bucks a bag. Very handy and fast.


#4

maybe use Rotel tomatoes, give it some extra heat from the peppers.

what about tossing this over some spaghetti squash, lower carb option, tends to go well with any sauce.


#5

And done! Most people who eat this assume it takes hours to make.

Enjoy!


#6

[quote]lawsonsamuels wrote:
maybe use Rotel tomatoes, give it some extra heat from the peppers.

what about tossing this over some spaghetti squash, lower carb option, tends to go well with any sauce. [/quote]

You know, I’ve only recently discovered spaghetti squash (thank you, darling Danielle), and that’s a great idea!


#7

During my first VDiet, one of my HSM’s was a Quinoa Jambalaya. The gist of it was:

Quinoa
Can of Crushed Tomatoes
Can of Diced Tomatoes
Whole Chicken Thighs
Chorizo (can be ditched for turkey sausage, but fuck if it isn’t tasty…)
Shrimp

Used a mix of white and red Quinoa, and it came out delicious…


#8

doing spaghetti squash tonight with grilled shrimp and some chayote squash sauteed with zucchini, onion and mushrooms.


#9

Chris, how much salt should be added? I assume 1-2 teaspoons, or to taste?


#10

[quote]ghost87 wrote:
Chris, how much salt should be added? I assume 1-2 teaspoons, or to taste? [/quote]

To taste.

I prefer RealSalt which is unprocessed so it contains all the trace minerals. But Kosher will work.


#11

Chris, on the salt: I remember something to the effect (and I’m paraphrasing Charles Poliquin here) that real unprocessed salt is never white, and may appear a light golden brownish in color. I’ve seen this stuff around too, but have never actually used it.

Having tried Kirkland’s sea salt (in the grinder) and Kosher salt myself, have you ever had experience using the “colored” stuff, raw or in cooking? Just curious as to the flavor and texture here.

Another point worth mentioning on the salt is that courseness makes a big difference sometimes - not necessarily in nutrient value but in actual cooking and flavor. While I use salt sparingly, if I’m grilling a prime cut of beef I like to use very course salt, as it caramelizes and tastes much better when exposed to an intensely hot flame.

(BTW, this is another reason why it’s so hard to duplicate steak form a top notch steakhouse…their heat is much hotter when cooking, and that gives the outside of the steak it’s flavor. The other reason is that their beef is usually a “select” cut and aged, which I don’t have the guts to try and replicate at home in fear of food poisoning, he he).

But I will have to try this jambalaya recipe, it looks super. That’s again for sharing!

  • Mike

#12

[quote]MikeManos wrote:
Chris, on the salt: I remember something to the effect (and I’m paraphrasing Charles Poliquin here) that real unprocessed salt is never white, and may appear a light golden brownish in color. I’ve seen this stuff around too, but have never actually used it. Having tried Kirkland’s sea salt (in the grinder) and Kosher salt myself, have you ever had experience using the “colored” stuff, raw or in cooking? Just curious as to the flavor and texture here.

  • Mike[/quote]

Yes, I use the colored stuff almost exclusively. The same as kosher as far as I can tell. I use the pink RealSalt brand mostly.


#13

Do you notice a difference in taste between pink salt and the other Real Salt products?


#14

Education time…subject near and dear to my heart.

This is not really Jambalaya, more like a Californian healthed-up version of the dish.

Being orginally from southern Louisiana, I am getting to the point where I feel the the use of the word “Jambalaya” in non-Louisianna restaruants is pretty mis-leading. Jambalaya is an easy but time consuming dish to make. What Chris has made here Louisianians call “white-Jambalaya”. It is an insult that refers at the same time to color of the rice and the color of the yankee’s skin that made it.

Chris, man, your a Texan…I know there is no love lost between Louisianians and Texans, but you should know better.


#15

[quote]therajraj wrote:
Do you notice a difference in taste between pink salt and the other Real Salt products?[/quote]

No. But I don’t use it as table salt much, but as cooking salt. Salting food when cooking is about bringing out the flavor of the food, not making it “salty.” Still, I’ve tasted it plain (just licked some off my palm) and it’s great stuff, even as a table salt.


#16

[quote]BigJawnMize wrote:
Education time…subject near and dear to my heart.

This is not really Jambalaya, more like a Californian healthed-up version of the dish.

Being orginally from southern Louisiana, I am getting to the point where I feel the the use of the word “Jambalaya” in non-Louisianna restaruants is pretty mis-leading. Jambalaya is an easy but time consuming dish to make. What Chris has made here Louisianians call “white-Jambalaya”. It is an insult that refers at the same time to color of the rice and the color of the yankee’s skin that made it.

Chris, man, your a Texan…I know there is no love lost between Louisianians and Texans, but you should know better. [/quote]

You’re right. It’s not “real” Jambalaya. I actually had a line in there about “pissing off Louisianians” but I cut it.

Then again, “real” jambalaya makes ya “real” fat. :wink:


#17

Dude, you gotta add some HEAT to that! I’d throw in some diced hot chiles for sure. Of course, I grow my own, and have about 1,000 dried from this summer’s crop, so I put them in EVERYTHING.


#18

[quote]HG Thrower wrote:
Dude, you gotta add some HEAT to that! I’d throw in some diced hot chiles for sure. Of course, I grow my own, and have about 1,000 dried from this summer’s crop, so I put them in EVERYTHING.[/quote]

Nice. Good tip!

I usually keep my powdered cayenne within arm’s reach too.


#19

did this with trader joe’s seafood sausage and the asian-style vegetable mix (onions, green beans, mushrooms, broccoli)… phenomenal. absolutely winderful recipe Chris. i never post but your recipes have been absolutely amazing to my life, thank you :slight_smile: will be trying it with the hot turkey sausage as well…


#20

[quote]hazeleyedKT wrote:
did this with trader joe’s seafood sausage and the asian-style vegetable mix (onions, green beans, mushrooms, broccoli)… phenomenal. absolutely winderful recipe Chris. i never post but your recipes have been absolutely amazing to my life, thank you :slight_smile: will be trying it with the hot turkey sausage as well… [/quote]

Awesome! Wish I had a Trader Joe’s nearby!