Biotest

Almond Iced Coffee


#1

http://images.t-nation.com/forum_images/4/8/484c6_ORIG-DSCN1055.jpg

[center]Hey Starbucks, Eat My Shorts [/center]
Did you know that Starbucks has a coffee drink that contains over 800 calories and 109 grams of carbohydrates? That’s 200 more worthless calories than a Big Mac.

Yeah, stick with the Americano or a nice cup of Pikes Place there, chubby.

Truthfully, I like Starbucks. I do some good writing from there. I flirt shamelessly with cute baristas. And I have a theory that a lot of that succulent caffeine somehow becomes airborne, gets absorbed into my system, and fuels my more intensive writing projects.

But I stick to the green tea and Americano. No 800-calorie sugar/fat bombs for this FFB (former fat boy.)

Today, I’m a big fan of almond milk. Making good almond milk involves a lot of overnight soaking, boiling, blanching, and straining. No thanks. Luckily, you can now just buy it by the carton. I like the <a href="http://www.bluediamond.com/index.cfm?navid=33"target=“new”>Blue Diamond brand, which is starting to show up in some regular grocery stores. No trip to the hippie health food store required.

It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk, something most body-conscious people should probably avoid. Almond milk has become a new staple for me in recipes, and sometimes I just have a cold glass all by itself. It’s that good.

Here’s my favorite homemade coffee drink using almond milk. Sorry Starbucks, but this beats the crap outta your “whole-latte-calorie” drinks.

[center]Almond Iced Coffee[/center]
In a shaker bottle, add:

1 or 2 cups of unsweetened almond milk
1 packet artificial sweetener of choice
1 packet or one serving of instant coffee
Handful of ice

Shake it up, pop a straw in it, and enjoy for only 40-80 calories.

Options

  1. Add a scoop of vanilla or chocolate <a href="http://www.tmuscle.com/productInfo.do?id=525024"target=“new”>Metabolic Drive.

  2. You can get almond milk in plain, vanilla, and even chocolate for just 5 more calories. So, lots of recipe variations there. Not all of it is unsweetened though, so read the label.

The only thing missing here is a cute barista.


#2

Ha ha, back on the coffee kick huh? So much for the “Coffee and Cosmetic Queers” installment. Welcome back to java land bro: The black blood of the earth welcomes you. =)

Just looked up the ingredients for the Blue Diamond brand of almond milk (I’m officially ashamed of myself; I didn’t even know that this stuff existed up until now!)…looks very good indeed. I’ll have to make a trip on my way home to the local supermarket or Whole Foods and get some tonight. :stuck_out_tongue:

One question though on your Almond Iced Coffee recipe: I’ve noticed that you use sucralose (and other artificial sweetners) a lot instead of stevia, which I’m sure would work well also. Do you not like the taste of stevia extract? If so, try another “higher end” brand, as the cheaper stuff (that’s even showing up on Walmart shelves now) can be a little bitter tasting by comparison.

Thanks again for another very useful nugget of info!


#3

[quote]MikeManos wrote:
Ha ha, back on the coffee kick huh? So much for the “Coffee and Cosmetic Queers” installment. Welcome back to java land bro: The black blood of the earth welcomes you. =)

Just looked up the ingredients for the Blue Diamond brand of almond milk (I’m officially ashamed of myself; I didn’t even know that this stuff existed up until now!)…looks very good indeed. I’ll have to make a trip on my way home to the local supermarket or Whole Foods and get some tonight. :stuck_out_tongue:

One question though on your Almond Iced Coffee recipe: I’ve noticed that you use sucralose (and other artificial sweetners) a lot instead of stevia, which I’m sure would work well also. Do you not like the taste of stevia extract? If so, try another “higher end” brand, as the cheaper stuff (that’s even showing up on Walmart shelves now) can be a little bitter tasting by comparison.

Thanks again for another very useful nugget of info![/quote]

I just order dentist-strength whitener from overseas pharmacies these days. Coffee and white teeth. Yes!

I’m not crazy about stevia. Plenty of studies showing that it’s probably not the healthiest stuff out there. Natural? Yes, but natural doesn’t always make it healthy.

My basic thoughts on modern artificial sweeteners are this: If you consumed 20 gallons of diet soda a day for 20 years, they may affect you negatively. So I don’t do that. (I may have two or three diet sodas per year.)

But what I do is use a variety of artificial sweeteners so I’m never getting too much of one kind. I rotate, in other words, and sure, stevia is part of that rotation. My favorites are fiber-added Splenda and this new kind (forget the name) that contains probiotics, but I rotate in the pink and blue stuff too.

And I always come back to this: Greatly over-consuming artificial sweeteners may not be healthy for you in the long run, but neither is eating tons of “natural” (even organic) sugar and the “pretend healthy” alternatives like agava nectar. The plethora of diseases and conditions associated with sugar are far far worse than what artificial sweeteners [i[might[/i] do to you after years of over-usage.

If being overweight is basically the #1 sign that something is going to take years off your life and/or life out of your years - and it is - then artificial sweeteners help you to prevent that.


#4

Great thought out answer as always…thank you for that!

Perhaps the approach that you use with the artificial sweetners is the right approach for many things, so it seems to me a conservative one. Taken a step further, when you think about it, rotating different types of veggies (as an example)in your everyday diet would probably be likewise advantageous also, as it minimizes the accumulation of certain types of toxins and pesticides associated with one type of produce (think broccoli here).

Of course, going organic greatly minimizes this, but how pure is pure in an largely impure world in the end? (And I would be at fault if I didn’t admit that I use sucralose - though sparringly - myself.)

Along similar lines, I eat 3-5 lbs of fresh/frozen fish (different types) per week during certain times of the year, and have been doing so for over two decades now. So according to recent studies, I should be deathly ill of PCB, mercury and dioxin poisoning. I’m not. And maybe it’s because I eat lots of sardines one week, tuna the next, and cod the following - i.e., I “mix” it up here as well. And also being extremely healthy (I believe) has a tremendous amount to do wtih it also.

I guess my big harp on stevia, after having read these aforementioned studies myself, is this: It’s effectively and safely been used for over 400 years in South American countries, so to me that beats any FDA short term study for safety and toxicity. I could be wrong here, of course, but everything is generally a game of probability and statistics, so I’ll take my chances with everybody else.

And yes, if it keeps America 10-20 lbs leaner by taking artificial sweetners, then that’s ceratinly for a greater (and more relevant) good - namely, living longer. So drink up folks. :slight_smile:

Again, well said, and thanks for the feedback!

  • Mike

#5

A few comments on the article today and comments above:

I LOVE ALMOND MILK! (the no added sugar kind) I like to use almond milk with the cereal “Fiber One” in the morning, along with eating an omelette.

I use a lot of Stevia. No artificial (and I don’t understand why anyone would call Stevia “artificial”) is perfect. Like Chris, I also rotate sweeteners, usually between Splenda and Stevia. I actually like the new packaged form call “Truvia” that is now found in stores.

Like Mike above, I still believe Stevia or Splenda is better than sugar. Sugar definitely has its place, namely post-workout.


#6

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:

I was hired as executive toilet warmer. My job was simple: sit on the toilet until TC or Tim needed to use it. That way their hypertrophied backsides would never have to come into contact with the harsh Colorado chill of an un-sat toilet seat. These days, that’s Nate Green’s job.

[/quote]

I’d kill for that job. I gotta keep Nate’s warm and, well, he doesn’t have indoor plumbing.

Fricking frost bite where there should be no frost.


#7

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk, something most body-conscious people should probably avoid.[/quote]

I feel like an idiot, but this confused me.

Do you mean avoid sugar, calories, and carbs? or are you sarcastically saying to avoid almond milk?


#8

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk, something most body-conscious people should probably avoid.[/quote]

I feel like an idiot, but this confused me.

Do you mean avoid sugar, calories, and carbs? or are you sarcastically saying to avoid almond milk?[/quote]

Avoid or reduce the use of regular milk.


#9

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk, something most body-conscious people should probably avoid.[/quote]

I feel like an idiot, but this confused me.

Do you mean avoid sugar, calories, and carbs? or are you sarcastically saying to avoid almond milk?[/quote]

Yeah, the sentence structure was a little confusing. Needed a colon perhaps.

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk: something most body-conscious people should probably avoid.[/quote]

I liked the post.


#10

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
It’s a great no-sugar, low-calorie, almost no-carb substitute for regular milk, something most body-conscious people should probably avoid.[/quote]

I feel like an idiot, but this confused me.

Do you mean avoid sugar, calories, and carbs? or are you sarcastically saying to avoid almond milk?[/quote]

Most body-conscious people should avoid regular milk.


#11

OK, a little tip for you all;

  1. Freeze any left over coffee in an ice cube tray
  2. Add some 100% cacao powder to make a mocha (basically, chocolate. I like Ghiardelli)

Now, when you want an iced coffee or a mocha, use the coffee cubes to keep from having a watered down drink.

I too like the almond milk. My wife LOVES iced coffee drinks and started using almond milk to make them for her. She is lactose intolerant so this works well. The cacao powder adds the chocolate flavor as well as a nice ‘bitterness’. A dash of nutmeg and cinnamon helps top it all off.


#12

Nice, Arioch!


#13

Tried this in the morning today. Used the same almond milk and instant coffee in the picture and added some vanilla protein to it. It tasted awesome, very “gourmet” tasting, lol i think thats the word i was looking for. Great way to kill two birds with one stone (breakfast + coffee in one bottle.) Took it with some fish oils (seperately of course). Maybe I’ll get some fiber powder to add to it to make it more complete, although the coffee + fiber may be a bad idea. Great post shugs.

Chris I like your dieting style, in that you eat very clean, but far from boring. I was wondering if you have ever experimented with Giardiniera recipes. I am not sure how popular or good giariniera is outside of Chicago, because I know it is mostly a Chicago condiment that is put onto italian beef sandwiches. It does go great with a lot of dishes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giardiniera Around here it typically contains cauliflower, carrots, green olives, peppers (green or red for mild and jalapenos for hot) in a variety of oils. Unfortunate it often uses vegetable or soybean oil. It is something you should look into because it would go great with a low carb diet, if a healthier version was made.


#14

Chris,

what do you think about using honey as a sweetener? not necessarily in coffee though


#15

[quote]BifWebster wrote:
I was wondering if you have ever experimented with Giardiniera recipes. I am not sure how popular or good giariniera is outside of Chicago, because I know it is mostly a Chicago condiment that is put onto italian beef sandwiches. It does go great with a lot of dishes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giardiniera Around here it typically contains cauliflower, carrots, green olives, peppers (green or red for mild and jalapenos for hot) in a variety of oils. Unfortunate it often uses vegetable or soybean oil. It is something you should look into because it would go great with a low carb diet, if a healthier version was made. [/quote]

Never heard of it, but will check into it! Thanks!


#16

[quote]jb2001 wrote:
Chris,

what do you think about using honey as a sweetener? not necessarily in coffee though[/quote]

Well, it’s “natural” but it’s still sugar. I wouldn’t use it if your main goal was fat loss. And most honey is processed crap. However, if you can get some raw unprocessed honey from a small maker, it’s not bad occasionally. I used it in my Half-Calorie Granola recipe (somewhere in the archives here.)


#17

It took a while, but I finally grew to like drinking my coffee black straight-up. But I will have to try out the unsweetened almond milk for other stuff. So thanks for the tip!

By the way, Chris - I hope you weren’t implying there’s something wrong with those Starbucks 800 calorie drinks? According to the well-informed fitness journalists employed by Time magazine, one of those mocha-latte-crappachinos (plus a nice big double chocolate muffin) is just the thing for a post-workout meal!

Well, at least it CAN be a PWO meal, if you’re one of those Neanderthals so stuck in the past as to be actually exercising. Because, as I’m sure you know, all the smart people who frequent Starbucks and read Time now know that exercise is actually pretty useless for weight control! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#18

I used to pile on the Sweet-n-Low but quit, cold turkey, about a year ago, learning to eat and drink with no sweetener of any kind at all. But I’ve been sweetening my morning oatmeal (which already contains a scoop of protein powder and a ton of berries) with raisons so it ain’t exactly low cal.

I’m considering foregoing the raisons and carefully re-integrating various fake sweeteners, instead… Hmmm…

I’d always been a believer that we should all get away from fake sweeteners because we don’t really know what they are, how long they stay in the body, or the long-term (possibly negative) cumulative effects. But even Dr. Oz was on tv the other day saying that he believed the so-called “risks” of all fake sweeteners were non-existent. Even the reporter to whom he was speaking couldn’t believe that his problem with diet sodas wasn’t because of the fake sweeteners.

When it comes to diet, It seems I’m always reconsidering everything.


#19

[quote]BobParr wrote:

By the way, Chris - I hope you weren’t implying there’s something wrong with those Starbucks 800 calorie drinks? According to the well-informed fitness journalists employed by Time magazine, one of those mocha-latte-crappachinos (plus a nice big double chocolate muffin) is just the thing for a post-workout meal!
[/quote]

Yeah, just read this morning about how you should never give up chocolate when dieting too. Just eat a little. Because portion control is SOOOOO effective with today’s 65% overweight/obese population. Sorta like the “just shoot a little heroin” method of beating drug addition. Very successful stuff there.


#20

[quote]SirenSong61 wrote:
I used to pile on the Sweet-n-Low but quit, cold turkey, about a year ago, learning to eat and drink with no sweetener of any kind at all. But I’ve been sweetening my morning oatmeal (which already contains a scoop of protein powder and a ton of berries) with raisons so it ain’t exactly low cal.

I’m considering foregoing the raisons and carefully re-integrating various fake sweeteners, instead… Hmmm…

I’d always been a believer that we should all get away from fake sweeteners because we don’t really know what they are, how long they stay in the body, or the long-term (possibly negative) cumulative effects. But even Dr. Oz was on tv the other day saying that he believed the so-called “risks” of all fake sweeteners were non-existent. Even the reporter to whom he was speaking couldn’t believe that his problem with diet sodas wasn’t because of the fake sweeteners.

When it comes to diet, It seems I’m always reconsidering everything.[/quote]

Interesting note: Dr. Bowden talks about how the body is made to want some sweetness. This may have evolved because we need Vitamin C so we’re “made” to crave sweetness. But obviously that sweetness meant fruit, berries, etc. not sugar, HFCS, etc. Modern society has hijacked a healthy sweet craving.

So here’s something I’ve done in the past when fighting that “need sweets” craving. I get those individually packages Sunsweet (?) prunes and eat ONE after a meal when my mind is saying “Chris, you need a sweet dessert.” Satisfies the sweet need nicely.