Biotest

Almond Flour Bread


#21

So Chris, would you be confident that you would not gain bodyfat while eating 3 loaves of this stuff per day in addition to say, 250g of protein from lean meats?

I mean, the macronutrients are there and it’s all stuff our bodies were “designed to eat”.


#22

I think that’s a bit of an extreme view. I interpreted Chris’ post to mean, “don’t fret over a few slices of this bread because it’s still better than eating something like even a couple slices of bread.”


#23

[quote]Stronghold wrote:
So Chris, would you be confident that you would not gain bodyfat while eating 3 loaves of this stuff per day in addition to say, 250g of protein from lean meats?

I mean, the macronutrients are there and it’s all stuff our bodies were “designed to eat”.[/quote]

Umm he’s not saying to eat 3 loafs of this a day, him and his wife use it and it’s gone in 2-3 days.

If your body is burning atleast 4,000 calories a day then you could probably do the above without gaining fat.


#24

[quote]Weevo wrote:

That’s what she said.[/quote]

Zing! I walked right into that one!


#25

So I tried making this bread today & I ran into a little trouble. I followed the recipe exactly & use blanched Honeyville almond flour. However, the bread did not rise at all. It looked like the biscotti pics, actually, definitely not any sandwiches. The batter was very thick and heavy & I had to spoon it into the pan, but I’m really not sure if that’s the issue or not. Maybe trying baking powder instead of baking soda? Maybe another egg? Some coconut oil? Any advice is appreciated!

One other question as well, regarding portioning for females when it comes to almond and flax flour recipes. The cals are very high so I’m just looking for some feedback on how much should actually be in my diet. I’m transitioning off of the v diet and still trying to lower BF %. I figured out that 1/20 of the loaf I made is about equal to 1 serving of the almond flour (very nerdy but I’m really afraid to put any weight on)…

Thanks!!


#26

I was considering making a garlic and cheese version… any suggestions?


#27

[quote]Reid23 wrote:
So I tried making this bread today & I ran into a little trouble. I followed the recipe exactly & use blanched Honeyville almond flour. However, the bread did not rise at all. It looked like the biscotti pics, actually, definitely not any sandwiches. The batter was very thick and heavy & I had to spoon it into the pan, but I’m really not sure if that’s the issue or not. Maybe trying baking powder instead of baking soda? Maybe another egg? Some coconut oil? Any advice is appreciated!

One other question as well, regarding portioning for females when it comes to almond and flax flour recipes. The cals are very high so I’m just looking for some feedback on how much should actually be in my diet. I’m transitioning off of the v diet and still trying to lower BF %. I figured out that 1/20 of the loaf I made is about equal to 1 serving of the almond flour (very nerdy but I’m really afraid to put any weight on)…

Thanks!![/quote]

  1. Sorry, not sure what to tell you. Works perfectly every time for me using the same recipe. Now, this stuff is dense compared to real kill-ya-deas-bread, but it does rise. Oven temps can vary wildly though, no matter what the oven is telling you, so maybe a longer cooking time is needed for your oven, or a higher temp. I HAVE added a little coconut oil (1 tablespoon) with good results though. Not necessary, but it’s worth a shot.

  2. Always choose good foods and counting calories really isn’t necessary. You’ll self-regulate over the day, the week, etc. I know you wanted a “eat X amount of cals” kinda answer, but I want you to think beyond that and not get caught up in counting calories or trying to eat very low cals the rest of your life. Choose goods foods, volumize with vegetables, eat lots of protein, continue to workout with intensity and focus, and you’ll be fine.


#28

[quote]therajraj wrote:
I was considering making a garlic and cheese version… any suggestions?[/quote]

Garlic powder or blend of powder and chopped fresh garlic.

Cheese is trickier. Never tried it. Maybe add shredded cheese to the raw “dough”? (And you might be able to drop an egg.) Maybe consider parm since it doesn’t melt like regular cheese.

Cool thing about most cooking is that if you can screw up and it’ll still be edible. Not perfect maybe, but not wasted.


#29

Chris, I followed the Almond Bread recipe to the letter from the Nuts to you article. The bread came out dry? Was it perhaps because of a hotter over and leaving it in too long?


#30

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:

[quote]therajraj wrote:
I was considering making a garlic and cheese version… any suggestions?[/quote]

Garlic powder or blend of powder and chopped fresh garlic.

Cheese is trickier. Never tried it. Maybe add shredded cheese to the raw “dough”? (And you might be able to drop an egg.) Maybe consider parm since it doesn’t melt like regular cheese.

Cool thing about most cooking is that if you can screw up and it’ll still be edible. Not perfect maybe, but not wasted. [/quote]

Great! i’ll mess around with it


#31

I’m a novice at baking, so I shot this recipe over to my mom. She actually found a local place that sells almond flour, albeit at a very high price ($12/pound). I swung by her place tonight and she’d made a loaf of the bread for us to try. Fantastic.

Perhaps a touch dry compared to most breads you’re used to, but that went out of my mind after the second or third bite. What surprised me the most was how the subtle almond flavor makes it such a potentially versatile recipe. That slightly sweet taste makes it taste like a treat, but it’s not so overpowering that you couldn’t go dipping this in something like avocado.

My mom used a wider pan, so the loaf wasn’t that tall, which took the possibility of PBJ sandwiches away. But it made for perfect dunking in a glass of almond milk. I felt as though I’d come across some forbidden loophole, since I was eating bread and drinking milk without an ounce of guilt because of sugar and carbs. It was like that episode of Seinfeld where they’re all about that non-fat frozen yogurt, except this didn’t turn out to be terrible for you.

Gonna order a five-pounder of the flour online and get cracking on some of these other recipes you’ve posted.


#32

[quote]Peterdbaker wrote:
Chris, I followed the Almond Bread recipe to the letter from the Nuts to you article. The bread came out dry? Was it perhaps because of a hotter over and leaving it in too long?[/quote]

It may be a touch dry, because of the density, compared to regular bread. I always joke that you need to have your water bottle handy. So that may be normal. It’s not that it’s dry, it’s that it seems to suck the moisture out of your mouth.


#33

[quote]BrickCallahan wrote:
I felt as though I’d come across some forbidden loophole, since I was eating bread and drinking milk without an ounce of guilt because of sugar and carbs.[/quote]

Ha! I like that!

This morning the wifey and I had chocolate muffins and milk for breakfast – all my healthy, keep-ya-lean variations. We had a laugh about what others would think if they saw us eating choc muffins…


#34

Tried the recipe and it came out great. I was at Meijer (local grocery) and all they had was Bob’s Red mill almond meal. I did not want to wait for the online order, so I used it. No real problems that I could see. I have bought almond meal at Trader Joes for a lot less, but did not have any trouble with the BRM brand. Bread is dead and almond meal is the real deal. Thanks again for a great recipe.


#35

^^^^ I didn’t even use purchased almond flour, I just took a bag of sliced almonds i purchased from the grocery store and ran them through the food processor.


#36

Chris,have you ever listed kitchen ware and stuff that you deem essential??


#37

Chris - not sure where to post but wanted to reach out with a question. I recently purchased the V-Diet (haven’t received it yet) but just found out that I will need to have shoulder surgery to repair a partially torn biceps tendon.

The question is…should I shelve the V-Diet until I can effectively do the workouts or can I still see the benefits without the resistance training. I am about 224 lbs, 6’2" and ~11-12% bf. Thanks.
Adam


#38

[quote]duodie wrote:
Chris,have you ever listed kitchen ware and stuff that you deem essential?? [/quote]

I don’t think so. But that would make a good blog entry.


#39

[quote]adamtowle wrote:
Chris - not sure where to post but wanted to reach out with a question. I recently purchased the V-Diet (haven’t received it yet) but just found out that I will need to have shoulder surgery to repair a partially torn biceps tendon.

The question is…should I shelve the V-Diet until I can effectively do the workouts or can I still see the benefits without the resistance training. I am about 224 lbs, 6’2" and ~11-12% bf. Thanks.
Adam
[/quote]

You’d get much better results in fat loss and muscle gain/retention if you could train properly during the diet. While you would lose fat with the diet alone, I want you to get the best results possible, not just “okay” results. But it’s up to you. I advise waiting. You can still eat a clean diet while recovering (think HSMs) then hit the V-Diet hard when you’re back to 100%.


#40

[quote]Wolfman155 wrote:
Tried the recipe and it came out great. I was at Meijer (local grocery) and all they had was Bob’s Red mill almond meal. I did not want to wait for the online order, so I used it. No real problems that I could see. I have bought almond meal at Trader Joes for a lot less, but did not have any trouble with the BRM brand. Bread is dead and almond meal is the real deal. Thanks again for a great recipe. [/quote]

Not sure why, but one cookbook author who uses almond meal a lot advises against Bob’s. Says it just doesn’t work for many of her recipes.

I order online now exclusively, getting 5 to 10 pounds at a time. Much cheaper in bulk.