Biotest

After V-Diet


#1

I train 5 days a week for general fitness - not body building (although for the past month I have been doing all your V Diet workouts). The V Diet has allowed me to lose 20-30 lbs of fat, leaving me about 10-15 lbs of residual fat around my belly and love handle area. (thank you!)

What do you recommend after transition if I am not interested in massive muscle gains - just leanness and some muscle definition? I want to lose that leftover fat while maintaining muscle size.

Nutritionally, my trainer recommends a 33/33/33 split between carbs/protein/fat with little to no bread/pasta etc. and only fruits and veggies for carbs. Does that sound right to you? Do you recommend any supplements for me?
Thanks for everything


#2

Congrats on your V-Diet success!

Several things here:

  1. I cringe a little when I hear someone say anything that sounds like “I don’t want to get too big.” First, it’s very hard for most people to get too muscular even if they’re trying. It’s not like you’re going to wake up some day and go, “Oh crap! I’m too big! Oopsie!” We wish it was that easy.

Most of the time, the best way to look retain leanness is to build muscle and let that muscle give you a roaring metabolism. This is much better than living your life lean but always on a restrictive low-carb diet. And since you do not have to get fat to muscle (old myth), then your goal when lifting weights should always be to build muscle. This relates to mindset and attitude as well as program selection and training. The guy or gal who’s thinking “I don’t want to build muscle” isn’t going to train in a way that even allows him or her to maintain muscle.

This is all an aside, I know, and not a direct answer to you question, but it’s important. It’s easy to fall into the “perpetual dieter” mindset, always trying to diet off or cardio off that last few pounds of fat. But this often backfires as metabolism is slowed down, cortisol is increased, and the end results is “skinny” or “skinny-fat” with a quick regain of body fat wen normal eating is resumed.

I could be way off here in regards to your personal needs, but it’s something to keep in mind.

  1. Direct answer: Some of our most successful Indigo-3G users are V-Diet vets. So if you haven’t yet, look into <a href="http://www.t-nation.com/store/products/indigo-3g"target=“new”>Indigo-3G. In a nutshell, this is a nutrient repartitioning agent that directs what you eat toward muscle instead of fat storage. Most Indigo-3G users can double or triple their clean carb intake, lose fat, and build muscle at the same time. “Curing” dysfunctional fat cells and nutrient uptake mechanisms is especially important for those who have had always had an issues getting or staying lean, or those who gain mostly fat on a mass diet instead of mostly muscle.

If you choose Indigo-3G, there are workouts provided, or you can use Reactive Pump or any Thibaudeau plan here on the site. The important thing is to choose a muscle-building workout plan and not a cardio-focused plan. My suggested “conditioning not cardio” workouts can be found here: <a href="http://tnation.t-nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_blog_hammer_velocity_shugart/running_makes_you_fat"target=“new”>Running Makes You Fat

  1. I’ve never used ratios of macronutrients in my life. Meals should not be math problems. It’s all about food selection and maybe overall calories when you’re ready to fine-tune. The same 33/33/33 split can make you lean or make you fat and unhealthy depending on food selection. Your trainer is correct in having your ditch the breads/pastas/wheat foods. Fruits are fine, but can slow fat loss if overdone. See our “The Evils of Fructose” article in the archives for details.

So, in short, the best thing for a V-Dieter is Indigo-3G, a muscle-building weight training plan, a little conditioning work if needed, and good food selection. It’s not a diet, but rather a lifestyle plan that will give you the results you want for the long term.


#3

Thanks for the reply and I think I gave the wrong impression - I am not averse to building muscle and do not fear getting “too big”.
I just wondered if the same supplements and diet choices (and amounts of food) would be the same for a body builder who DOES want hugeness and someone like me whose goal is not size, but health and a great looking physique - visible abs, good muscle definition all around.

I train with kettlebells and there is definitely muscle building happening - just no muscle isolation size-building exercises.
So I get from your reply that Indigo 3 is the way to go. Will it still be effective if I stick to the general fitness Kbell training and not the muscle isolation exercise plan?


#4

[quote]nmonaco wrote:

So I get from your reply that Indigo 3 is the way to go. Will it still be effective if I stick to the general fitness Kbell training and not the muscle isolation exercise plan?[/quote]

Indigo-3G even works for non-trainers even as far helping with the underlying issues goes. (Of coursed they don’t pack on pounds of muscle not training.) So, Indigo should be great for you and your goals.